Federico Fellini’s films are known for their visual style, which features strong images and vivid colors.

Fellini’s use of light and dark contrasts, as well as his attention to detail have made his work highly influential in the world of cinema.

Best Federico Fellini Films

Here are some of the best Federico Fellini films.

1. La dolce vita (1960)                   

La dolce vita is a cinematic masterpiece that captures the essence of post-war Italy. Directed by Federico Fellini, this film takes us on a journey through the decadent lifestyle of the rich and famous in Rome.

Marcello Mastroianni delivers a stunning performance as Marcello Rubini, a journalist who is searching for meaning in his life while navigating the shallow and hedonistic world he finds himself in.

The film is a visual feast, with each scene beautifully crafted and full of symbolism.

From the opening shot of a statue of Christ being airlifted over the city, to the famous scene of Anita Ekberg frolicking in the Trevi Fountain, every moment is a work of art.

But La dolce vita is more than just a pretty picture.

It is a commentary on the emptiness of modern life and the search for something more meaningful.

Throughout the film, we see characters struggling with their own sense of purpose and identity, as they try to find happiness in fleeting pleasures and material possessions.

Fellini’s direction is masterful, as he weaves together multiple storylines and themes into a cohesive and thought-provoking narrative.

The film is a reminder that true happiness and fulfillment cannot be found in external things, but must come from within.

La Dolce Vita
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Anita Ekberg, Anouk Aimée, Magali Noël (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Ennio Flaiano (Writer) - Angelo Rizzoli (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

2. 8½ (1963)

Federico Fellini’s 8½ is a masterpiece of Italian cinema that has stood the test of time.

Marcello Mastroianni stars as Guido Anselmi, a film director struggling with creative block as he tries to make his next movie.

   

The plot may sound simple, but the film is anything but. Fellini weaves a complex web of dreams, memories, and fantasies that blur the line between reality and imagination.

Visually stunning, the film is a feast for the eyes with its stunning black and white cinematography and surreal imagery.

The cast is fantastic, with Mastroianni delivering a nuanced performance as the troubled director.

The supporting cast is equally impressive, with standout performances from Anouk Aimée and Claudia Cardinale.

What sets 8½ apart is its ability to capture the creative process itself. Fellini’s film is a meditation on the art of filmmaking and the struggles that come with it.

The film’s themes of identity, creativity, and the role of the artist in society are explored with depth and nuance.

8 1/2 (English Subtitled)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Marcello Mastroianni, Bruno Agostini, Sandra Milo (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Ennio Flaiano (Writer) - Angelo Rizzoli (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)

3. The Road (1954)

“The Road” is a hauntingly beautiful film that delves deep into the human psyche and explores the themes of survival, hope, and despair.

Directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne, the film tells the story of a man and his young nephew who embark on a perilous journey across a post-apocalyptic wasteland in search of a better life.

The cinematography in this film is simply breathtaking, capturing the stark beauty of the barren landscapes and the endless horizon with stunning precision.

John Wayne delivers one of his most nuanced performances as the rugged yet compassionate man who must navigate the dangers of this new world while protecting his young charge.

What sets this film apart is its unflinching exploration of human nature in the face of adversity.

The characters are forced to confront their own mortality and make difficult choices that test their moral and ethical boundaries.

The film’s exploration of the human condition is both poignant and powerful, leaving a lasting impression on the viewer.

   

4. Nights of Cabiria (1957)           

Nights of Cabiria is a powerful and moving melodrama directed by the legendary Federico Fellini.

The story follows the life of Cabiria, a streetwalker in Rome, who is betrayed and left to drown by her boyfriend Giorgio.

Despite the tragedy, Cabiria is determined to find happiness in a cynical world.

Giulietta Masina gives an unforgettable performance as Cabiria, with her shrugs, walk, and facial expressions reminiscent of Chaplin’s Little Tramp and Lucille Ball.

The film was greatly welcomed around the world during the 1950s and continues to be a shining jewel in the cinematic world.

It is often considered as the best Italian film of the 50s and its mawkish power is immense, executing a huge influence in subsequent decades of direction.

Nights of Cabiria is a soul-satisfying and soul-crushing classic film that contains one of the greatest performances I have ever seen, male or female.

The Nights of Cabiria (1957) ( Le notti di Cabiria ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, Blu-Ray, Reg.B Import - Germany ]
  • The Nights of Cabiria (1957) ( Le notti di Cabiria )
  • The Nights of Cabiria (1957)
  • Le notti di Cabiria
  • Giulietta Masina, François Périer, Ennio Girolami (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - The Nights of Cabiria (1957) ( Le notti di Cabiria ) (Producer)

5. Juliet of the Spirits (1965

Juliet of the Spirits is a visually stunning and surreal film by the legendary director Federico Fellini.

The film follows the journey of Juliet, a middle-aged woman who is struggling to come to terms with her husband’s infidelity and her own unfulfilled desires.

   

As she delves deeper into her subconscious, she encounters a cast of eccentric characters and vivid hallucinations, ultimately leading her towards a path of self-discovery.

The film’s use of Technicolor is breathtaking, with vibrant colors and surreal imagery that transport the viewer into Juliet’s dreamlike world.

The performances are equally impressive, with Giulietta Masina giving a nuanced and powerful portrayal of a woman coming to terms with her own identity.

While the film can be challenging at times with its abstract approach, it is ultimately a rewarding experience for those willing to immerse themselves in its unique vision.

Juliet of the Spirits is a masterpiece of Italian cinema and a must-see for fans of Fellini’s work or anyone looking for a truly unique film experience.

Juliet of the Spirits
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Giulietta Masina, Sandra Milo, Mario Pisu (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Federico Fellini (Writer) - Angelo Rizzoli (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

6. Il Bidone (1955)          

Il Bidone, directed by the legendary Federico Fellini, is a hauntingly beautiful and emotionally resonant film that explores the depths of human greed and desperation.

The film follows a group of con artists who prey on the vulnerable and the unsuspecting, using their charm and cunning to extract money from their victims.

At the heart of the story is Augusto, played brilliantly by the incomparable Broderick Crawford, a seasoned con man who is beginning to question the morality of his actions and the toll they are taking on his soul.

The film is a masterclass in storytelling, with Fellini’s signature visual style and poetic dialogue transporting the viewer to a world of shadows and deceit.

The performances are uniformly excellent, with Crawford in particular delivering a tour-de performance that is both nuanced and emotionally raw.

But what sets Il Bidone apart from other crime dramas is its profound empathy for its characters, even as they engage in despicable acts.

Fellini never judges his characters, instead allowing the audience to see the complexities of their motivations and the harsh realities of their lives.

The result is a film that is both deeply moving and thought-provoking, leaving a lasting impression long after the credits roll.

Il Bidone
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Broderick Crawford, Richard Basehart, Giulietta Masina (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Federico Fellini (Writer) - Silvio Clementelli (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)

7. Boccaccio ’70 (1962) 

Boccaccio ’70 is a delightful anthology film featuring four distinct stories, each helmed by a different director.

The film is a celebration of Italian cinema, showcasing the talents of Federico Fellini, Luchino Visconti, Mario Monicelli, and Vittorio De Sica.

Fellini’s segment, “Le tentazioni del dottor Antonio” (The Temptation of Dr. Antonio), is a satirical take on the advertising industry and its effect on society.

It’s a visually stunning piece that showcases Fellini’s signature style and surreal imagery.

Visconti’s “Il lavoro” (The Job) is a gritty examination of the struggles faced by factory workers in post-war Italy.

It’s a poignant and moving piece that highlights the human cost of industrialization.

Monicelli’s “La riffa” (The Raffle) is a lighthearted and comedic take on the Italian tradition of raffling off women as prizes.

It’s a fun and playful segment that’s sure to leave a smile on your face.

De Sica’s “Renzo e Luciana” (Renzo and Luciana) is a romantic tale of two young lovers trying to navigate the complexities of class and social status.

It’s a beautifully shot piece that perfectly captures the charm and romance of Italy.

Boccaccio 70
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Anita Ekberg, Romy Schneider, Sophia Loren (Actors)
  • Vittorio De Sica (Director) - Federico Fellini (Writer) - Tonino Cervi (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

8. Spirits of the Dead (1968) 

Spirits of the Dead is a chilling and atmospheric anthology of three short films, each based on a work by Edgar Allan Poe.

Directed by three cinematic titans – Federico Fellini, Louis Malle, and Roger Vadim – the film showcases their unique visions and styles, while staying true to the haunting and macabre themes of Poe’s stories.

Fellini’s contribution, “Toby Dammit,” is a surreal and unsettling tale of a drunken actor (Terence Stamp) who is haunted by a demonic child while on his way to receive an award.

Stamp’s manic performance and Fellini’s signature dreamlike visuals make this segment a standout.

Malle’s “William Wilson” is a psychological thriller that explores the duality of man through the story of a wealthy aristocrat (Alain Delon) haunted by his own double.

Delon’s brooding intensity and Malle’s elegant direction create a mesmerizing and haunting viewing experience.

Finally, Vadim’s “Metzengerstein” tells the story of a cruel and hedonistic noblewoman (Jane Fonda) who becomes obsessed with a beautiful black stallion.

Vadim’s lush visuals and Fonda’s commanding presence make this segment a visually stunning and captivating finale.

Spirits of the Dead is a must-watch for fans of Edgar Allan Poe, as well as those who appreciate stylish and atmospheric horror films.

The three segments are beautifully crafted, each with its own unique flavor and vision, and the film as a whole is a haunting and unforgettable experience.

Spirits of the Dead
  • Jane Fonda, Brigitte Bardot, Alain Delon (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Bernardino Zapponi (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

9. Fellini Satyricon (1969)

“Fellini Satyricon” is a mesmerizing and surreal masterpiece from the incomparable Federico Fellini.

The film takes the audience on a journey through the ancient Roman world, following the exploits of two young men as they seek pleasure and adventure amidst the decadence and chaos of their society.

The visuals are stunning, with Fellini’s signature style of colorful and dreamlike imagery transporting viewers to a world that feels both familiar and otherworldly.

The performances are equally impressive, with the actors fully committing to the bizarre and often grotesque characters they portray.

While the film may not be for everyone, those who appreciate experimental cinema and are willing to take the journey will be rewarded with a truly unforgettable experience.

“Fellini Satyricon” is a testament to Fellini’s genius and a must-see for any fan of cinema.

Fellini Satyricon Original Lobby Card Mario Romagnoli Magali Noel 1969 Classic
  • FELLINI SATYRICON Original Lobby Card Martin Potter Max Born Mario Romagnoli Magali Noel Federico...
  • This lobby card is from Great Britain and was printed during the actual year the film was released...
  • We have a huge archive of over 250,000 original lobby cards, mostly from the 1930's to the 1980's....

10. Variety Lights (1950)              

Variety Lights is a charming and entertaining film that showcases the talents of two Italian legends in the making, Federico Fellini and Giulietta Masina.

This early collaboration between the two artists tells the story of a struggling vaudeville troupe and its ambitious leader, played by Masina.

The film is a delightful mix of comedy, drama, and romance, with a sharp eye for the absurdity of show business and the dreams and desires of those who pursue it.

Masina’s performance is a standout, capturing both the vulnerability and the determination of her character, while Fellini’s direction is full of energy and visual flair.

The supporting cast is also excellent, with a number of memorable characters and moments, including a hilarious impersonation of Charlie Chaplin and a touching duet between Masina and her co-star, played by Peppino De Filippo.

Variety Lights (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Peppino De Filippo, Carla Del Poggio, Giulietta Masina (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

11. The White Sheik (1952)         

“The White Sheik” is a delightful and charming Italian comedy directed by the legendary Federico Fellini.

The film follows the misadventures of a newlywed couple, Ivan and Wanda, as they travel to Rome for their honeymoon.

However, their plans are derailed when Wanda becomes obsessed with meeting the star of her favorite fotoromanzi (a type of Italian comic book), the White Sheik.

What follows is a hilarious and surreal journey through the streets of Rome, as Ivan desperately tries to keep his wife from making a fool of herself while also dealing with his own marital issues.

The film is a wonderful showcase of Fellini’s early style, with its vibrant colors, quirky characters, and playful sense of humor.

The cast is excellent, with Alberto Sordi giving a standout performance as the hapless Ivan, and Leopoldo Trieste as the hilariously flamboyant White Sheik.

The film also features some memorable supporting performances, including Brunella Bovo as the naive and star-struck Wanda, and Giulietta Masina (Fellini’s wife and muse) in a small but memorable role as a fortune teller.

The White Sheik (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Alberto Sordi, Giulietta Masina, Brunella Bovo (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Ennio Flaiano (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

12. I Vitelloni (1953)                      

I Vitelloni is a classic Italian film directed by Federico Fellini that follows the lives of a group of young men in a small seaside town.

The film is a coming-of-age story that explores themes of friendship, family, and the struggles of growing up.

The characters are all well-developed and relatable, each with their own unique quirks and flaws.

The performances by the cast are exceptional, particularly Franco Interlenghi as the troubled and aimless Moraldo.

Fellini’s direction is masterful, capturing the essence of small-town life in post-war Italy with stunning cinematography and cleverly placed symbolism.

The film’s pacing is slow but deliberate, allowing the audience to fully immerse themselves in the characters’ world.

I Vitelloni (English Subtitled)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Franco Interlenghi, Alberto Sordi, Franco Fabrizi (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Federico Fellini (Writer) - Jacques Bar (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)

13. Roma (1972)              

As a film enthusiast, I cannot stress enough how much I enjoyed watching Roma.

This Italian masterpiece directed by Federico Fellini is a poignant and visually stunning depiction of life in Rome during the 1930s.

The film follows the life of Clelia, a young woman who moves to Rome to work as a secretary at a fashion house.

The cinematography in Roma is breathtaking, with each shot beautifully composed and carefully crafted to convey a certain mood or emotion.

The film’s use of black and white photography adds to its timeless and classic feel, giving it a sense of nostalgia that is hard to resist.

The characters in Roma are all uniquely complex, with each one representing a different aspect of society in Rome at the time.

They are all brought to life by a talented cast who deliver nuanced and captivating performances.

One of the things that I appreciate most about Roma is its ability to capture the essence of Rome itself.

The film’s depiction of the city is both romantic and realistic, highlighting the beauty and charm of Rome while also acknowledging its flaws and imperfections.

 

Roma (1972) ( Fellini's Roma ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, Blu-Ray, Reg.B Import - United Kingdom ]
  • Roma (1972) ( Fellini's Roma )
  • Roma (1972)
  • Fellini's Roma
  • Marne Maitland, Anna Magnani, Peter Gonzales Falcon (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Roma (1972) ( Fellini's Roma ) (Producer)

14. I Remember (1973) 

I Remember is a deeply moving and introspective film that explores the themes of memory, loss, and the passage of time.

Directed by Avi Mograbi, this Israeli documentary is a powerful and emotional journey that challenges viewers to confront their own memories and reflect on their own experiences.

The film follows Mograbi’s journey as he attempts to reconnect with his childhood friend, who he has not seen in over twenty years.

As they catch up and reminisce about their shared past, Mograbi begins to realize how much he has forgotten and how much he has changed since their last meeting.

What makes I Remember so compelling is its honesty and vulnerability.

Mograbi’s candid reflections on his own memories and experiences are both relatable and poignant, and his willingness to confront his own flaws and imperfections is truly admirable.

The film’s use of archival footage and personal photographs adds to its emotional depth, providing glimpses into Mograbi’s past and allowing viewers to connect with him on a deeper level.

The film’s pacing is deliberate and measured, allowing the themes and emotions to slowly build and culminate in a powerful and unforgettable finale.

 

As I remember, 1903-1973
  • Hafer, Vera Hamill (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 161 Pages - 06/13/1973 (Publication Date) - Mennonite Press (Publisher)

15. Fellini’s Casanova (1976)      

Fellini’s Casanova is a visually stunning and thought-provoking film that explores the life and legend of the infamous Italian lover, Giacomo Casanova.

Directed by the legendary Federico Fellini, this film is a masterclass in cinematic storytelling, with each shot carefully crafted to convey a certain mood or emotion.

The film follows Casanova’s journey as he travels through Europe, seducing women and experiencing all the pleasures that life has to offer.

But beneath the surface of this hedonistic lifestyle lies a deeper sense of loneliness and isolation, as Casanova grapples with the emptiness of his own existence.

What makes Fellini’s Casanova so compelling is its ability to capture the essence of the time and place in which it is set.

The costumes, sets, and cinematography all work together to create a vivid and immersive world that is both intoxicating and unsettling.

The film’s central performance by Donald Sutherland is nothing short of remarkable.

He brings a raw and vulnerable quality to the character of Casanova, making him both sympathetic and complex.

The supporting cast is equally impressive, with each actor delivering nuanced and captivating performances.

At its core, Fellini’s Casanova is a meditation on the human condition, exploring the themes of love, desire, and the search for meaning in life.

It is a film that will leave you feeling both exhilarated and introspective, a true testament to the power of cinema to provoke thought and emotion.

 

Fellini's Casanova (1976) ( Il Casanova di Federico Fellini ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, Blu-Ray, Reg.B Import - France ]
  • Fellini's Casanova (1976) ( Il Casanova di Federico Fellini )
  • Fellini's Casanova (1976)
  • Il Casanova di Federico Fellini
  • Donald Sutherland, Tina Aumont, Cicely Browne (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Fellini's Casanova (1976) ( Il Casanova di Federico Fellini )...

16. Orchestra Rehearsal (1978) 

Orchestra Rehearsal is a unique and visually captivating film that explores the power dynamics and tensions within a symphony orchestra.

Directed by the legendary Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini, this film is a testament to his artistry and creativity, with each shot carefully crafted to convey a certain mood or emotion.

The film follows a group of musicians as they gather for a rehearsal in an abandoned church.

As they begin to play, tensions rise and conflicts emerge, revealing the underlying power struggles and egos within the group.

What makes Orchestra Rehearsal so compelling is its use of music as a storytelling device.

The music becomes a character in its own right, driving the drama forward and providing a sense of momentum to the story.

The film’s use of close-ups and long shots creates a sense of intimacy and grandeur, making each musical sequence feel like a truly immersive experience.

The film’s cast is also impressive, with each actor delivering a nuanced and captivating performance.

The characters are complex and multi-layered, with each one representing a different aspect of the human experience.

At its core, Orchestra Rehearsal is a meditation on the power dynamics that exist within any group, whether it be a symphony orchestra or a society at large.

It is a film that will leave you feeling both exhilarated and introspective, a true testament to the power of cinema to provoke thought and emotion.

 

17. City of Women (1980)           

City of Women directed by Federico Fellini is a surreal exploration of the male psyche and its relationship with women.

Marcello Mastroianni stars as Snàporaz, a businessman who finds himself trapped at a hotel and threatened by women en masse.

The film follows Snàporaz as he is confronted with the phantoms of all the women he has known, or wanted to know, from childhood on.

Fellini’s direction is full of bizarre imagery and often peculiar fantasies, addressing many male anxieties and fears.

The film is long, but worth a watch, and a revisit could prove even more rewarding.

 

City of Women
  • City of Women (1980) ( La Cité des femmes ) ( La Città delle donne )
  • City of Women (1980)
  • La Cité des femmes
  • La Città delle donne
  • French, English (Subtitles)

18. The Ship Sails On (1983)       

The Ship Sails On is a visually stunning masterpiece that tells the story of a group of passengers who embark on a luxurious voyage to scatter the ashes of a famous opera singer.

Directed by the legendary Federico Fellini, the film is a surreal and dreamlike journey that takes place on a ship filled with eccentric characters, from a Russian prince to a bearded lady.

The cinematography of the film is simply breathtaking, with each shot beautifully composed and lit to create a sense of otherworldliness.

The costumes and set design are equally impressive, transporting the audience to a bygone era of opulence and grandeur.

As the ship sails on, tensions rise and relationships are tested, all while the passengers navigate their way through a series of strange and unexpected events.

The film is both funny and poignant, with moments of levity offset by moments of deep emotion.

 

And the Ship Sails On (The Criterion Collection)
  • Freddie Jones, Barbara Jefford, Victor Poletti (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Federico Fellini (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

19. Ginger & Fred (1986)              

Ginger & Fred is a poignant and witty satire from the iconic Italian director Federico Fellini.

The film tells the story of two aging dancers, played brilliantly by the incomparable Marcello Mastroianni and Giulietta Masina, who are reunited after 30 years to perform on a TV show called “Assisi Calling.”

The film is a commentary on the cult of celebrity and the commodification of art in the modern age.

Fellini’s signature surreal style is on full display, with a whimsical and dreamlike atmosphere that is both melancholic and nostalgic.

Mastroianni and Masina are a delight to watch, their chemistry and timing impeccable as they dance and reminisce about their past.

The supporting cast is equally strong, with standout performances from Franco Fabrizi and Friedrich von Ledebur.

The film is both funny and heartbreaking, with Fellini’s sharp wit and biting social commentary providing a powerful commentary on the human condition.

The cinematography is stunning, with each shot carefully composed and lit to create a sense of visual poetry.

 

Ginger and Fred (1986)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Giulietta Masina, Marcello Mastroianni, Franco Fabrizi (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Federico Fellini (Writer) - Alberto Grimaldi (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

20. Intervista (1987)

Intervista is a mesmerizing and self-reflexive film from the legendary Italian director Federico Fellini.

The film is a meta-commentary on the art of filmmaking and the relationship between the filmmaker and the subject.

The story follows Fellini as he prepares to shoot a film about a famous Hollywood actress, played by Anita Ekberg, who he previously worked with on his iconic film “La Dolce Vita.

The film blurs the lines between reality and fiction, with Fellini’s signature surrealism on full display.

The film is a love letter to cinema, with Fellini exploring the magic and mystery of the filmmaking process.

The cinematography is breathtaking, with each shot carefully framed and lit to create a sense of wonder and enchantment.

The performances are outstanding, with Ekberg and Fellini playing versions of themselves in a meta-narrative that is both hilarious and poignant.

The supporting cast is equally impressive, with standout performances from Marcello Mastroianni and Sergio Rubini.

Intervista is a visual and philosophical feast for lovers of cinema, a film that challenges the viewer to question the nature of art and the role of the artist.

It’s a must-see for fans of Fellini and anyone who appreciates great filmmaking.

 

Conversazioni e interviste 1963-1987 (Gli struzzi Vol. 486) (Italian Edition)
  • Amazon Kindle Edition
  • Levi, Primo (Author)
  • Italian (Publication Language)
  • 352 Pages - 01/26/2016 (Publication Date) - EINAUDI (Publisher)

21. The Voice of the Moon (1990)

The Voice of the Moon is a surreal and whimsical film from the legendary Italian director Federico Fellini.

The film follows the journey of Ivo Salvini, played by Roberto Benigni, a charismatic and eccentric character who wanders the Italian countryside in search of his place in the world.

The film is a meditation on the human condition, with Fellini exploring themes of identity, love, and the search for meaning in a chaotic and confusing world.

The cinematography is stunning, with each shot carefully composed and lit to create a sense of dreamlike beauty.

Benigni’s performance is a tour-de-force, with his boundless energy and infectious charm bringing the character of Salvini to life in a way that is both hilarious and heartbreaking.

The supporting cast is equally strong, with standout performances from Paolo Villaggio and Nadia Ottaviani.

The film is a departure from Fellini’s earlier works, with a more contemplative and introspective tone that is both challenging and rewarding.

The soundtrack, composed by Fellini’s longtime collaborator Nino Rota, is hauntingly beautiful and adds to the film’s surreal and otherworldly atmosphere.

 

The Voice of the Moon
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Roberto Benigni, Paolo Villaggio, Nadia Ottaviani (Actors)
  • Federico Fellini (Director) - Ermanno Cavazzoni (Writer) - Mario Cecchi Gori (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Characteristics of Federico Fellini Films

Fellini’s films are characterized by an ironic, self-referential style that is refreshingly different from both Hollywood and Italian neorealism.

The director’s use of humor and fantasy in his films is also notable.

Fellini was famous for his use of body doubles and other artificial means to create the illusion that he was making reality-based films about the real world.

He also frequently manipulated his own characters during the filming process, often using them as comic relief or to extend the narrative beyond what would have been possible in a realistic film.

His films often have a surreal quality because they are stylized and dreamlike; this includes the imagery and dialogue, which frequently convey surrealistic significance.

The plots of many of Fellini’s films are often quite simple but make use of archetypal structures to explore complex themes such as alienation, love, family relationships and power dynamics.

Many of his characters are troubled or outcast; this is especially true of those who live on the margins of society (e.g., adolescents).

The themes that emerge from these characters’ lives include sexuality (especially gay sexuality), free will versus determinism (i.e., fate versus free will)

Best Federico Fellini Films – Wrapping Up

The films of Federico Fellini are a rich, almost unfathomable tapestry of the Italian filmmaker’s life and times.

From his early films to his later works, there is a distinct artistic style that emerges from the work of the master.

His films are often defined by their surrealism; they are dreamlike and surreal. They also tend to be very long, with some running over three hours long.

Of course, he was no stranger to lengthy films, but many of his films were very long nonetheless.

Fellini also made several films that combined elements of fantasy and reality into one cohesive whole. This can be seen in such films as 8½ or The Nights of Cabiria. Other films like Roma (1972) feature stylized sets and characters who seem to exist in some kind of alternative universe.

Some may argue that Fellini’s films should be grouped together based on similar themes or plots, but this would not do justice to the scope and diversity of Fellini’s work.

He was an artist who synthesized all aspects of filmmaking into one final product: his films themselves.

 

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