Silent movies, also known as “silent films”, were a dominant form of cinema from the late 19th century to the early 1930s. They were called “silent” because they were made before the advent of synchronized sound in films, and thus did not have recorded dialogue or sound effects.

Instead, they relied on visual storytelling and musical accompaniment to convey emotions and advance the plot.

Despite the lack of sound, silent films were able to capture the imagination of audiences around the world, and many of them are now considered classics of cinema.

They were known for their unique visual styles, innovative use of camera techniques, and their ability to convey complex emotions and ideas without the use of spoken language.

Some of the best silent movies include “Metropolis” (1927) directed by Fritz Lang, “The General” (1926) directed by Buster Keaton.

“City Lights” (1931) directed by Charlie Chaplin, “Nosferatu” (1922) directed by F.W. Murnau, and “The Passion of Joan of Arc” (1928) directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer.

Best Silent Movies

These films continue to be celebrated for their contributions to the art of filmmaking, and their influence can still be seen in modern cinema today.

1. The Wind (1928)

“The Wind” is a silent drama film released in 1928, directed by Victor Sjöström and starring Lillian Gish. The movie tells the story of Letty Mason, a young woman who moves from Virginia to Texas to live with her cousin on a remote ranch.

Letty struggles to adjust to the harsh and isolated environment, and the constant wind that blows through the plains begins to take a toll on her sanity.

The film is notable for its stunning cinematography and visual effects, which create a sense of isolation and desolation in the vast and unforgiving Texas landscape.

Lillian Gish’s performance as Letty has also been praised for its emotional depth and sensitivity.

Despite its initial critical and commercial failure, “The Wind” has since been reevaluated and is now considered a classic of silent cinema.

The movie’s themes of isolation, madness, and survival in the face of adversity continue to resonate with audiences and filmmakers today.

   

2. Sunrise (1927)

“Sunrise” is a silent film directed by German filmmaker F.W. Murnau and released in 1927. The movie tells the story of a farmer (George O’Brien) who is tempted by a city woman (Margaret Livingston) to drown his wife (Janet Gaynor) and start a new life with her.

However, he has a change of heart and tries to win back his wife’s love and forgiveness.

Considered a masterpiece of silent cinema, “Sunrise” is known for its innovative cinematography, use of visual storytelling, and emotional depth.

The film was praised for its poetic and lyrical style, which evokes a dreamlike atmosphere and explores universal themes such as love, redemption, and the human condition.

“Sunrise” was a critical success and won three Academy Awards, including Best Actress for Janet Gaynor, who also won for her performances in “Seventh Heaven” and “Street Angel.”

The film’s influence can be seen in later works of cinema, such as Terrence Malick’s “Days of Heaven” and Wong Kar-wai’s “In the Mood for Love.”

Sunrise [Blu-ray + DVD] (Masters of Cinema) (1927)
  • Contains Both Blu-ray & DVD versions - Special Dual Format Edition - Restored HD transfers >...
  • Three Discs - Rare Outtakes with John Bailey Commentary - Original Theatrical Trailer
  • Original English intertitles on the Movietone and optional English subtitles on the Czech
  • Original Movietone Score (mono) - Alternate Olympic Chamber Orchestra (stereo). Full-length Audio...
  • 20 Page Booklet with Details of the Film Restorations and Comparisons of Versions

3. The Kid (1921)

The Kid is a 1921 silent comedy-drama film directed by Charlie Chaplin. The movie tells the story of a tramp who takes in and cares for an abandoned baby, whom he names John, and raises him as his own.

As John grows up, he and the tramp face a series of challenges and misadventures, including encounters with the police and an attempt to return John to his wealthy family.

The film stars Charlie Chaplin as the tramp and Jackie Coogan as John, the kid. The Kid is widely regarded as one of Chaplin’s greatest works and a landmark in the history of cinema.

The movie was a commercial success and helped solidify Chaplin’s status as a major star in Hollywood.

The Kid is notable for its blend of humor and pathos, as well as its social commentary on poverty and the struggles of the working class. The film is also notable for its innovative use of flashbacks, dream sequences, and special effects, which were groundbreaking for their time.

   

4. Intolerance (1916)

“Intolerance” is a silent epic film released in 1916, directed by D.W. Griffith. The film weaves together four separate stories from different time periods to explore themes of intolerance and the destructive effects of hatred and prejudice.

The four stories include the Babylonian Empire, the life of Jesus Christ, the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in France, and a contemporary story about a young couple torn apart by class differences.

“Intolerance” is known for its ambitious scope and scale, with massive sets, elaborate costumes, and thousands of extras. The film was also groundbreaking in its use of cinematic techniques such as cross-cutting and parallel editing to interweave the different storylines.

The film was not a commercial success upon its release, but it has since become recognized as a masterpiece of silent cinema and a landmark in film history.

“Intolerance” has influenced numerous filmmakers and has been praised for its innovative storytelling and technical achievements.

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5. The Crowd (1928)

“The Crowd” is a 1928 American silent film directed by King Vidor and starring James Murray and Eleanor Boardman.

The film follows the life of an average man named John Sims (Murray), from his days as a young man full of hope and ambition to his struggles to provide for his family as a clerk in a large corporation.

   

The film portrays the hardships and challenges of everyday life, and highlights the importance of perseverance and resilience in the face of adversity.

It also explores themes such as the struggle for individuality and the impact of societal pressure on the individual.

“The Crowd” was a critical and commercial success, and is considered a classic of the silent film era. The film was praised for its realistic portrayal of everyday life, and for its use of innovative camera techniques such as deep focus and montage.

It has since been preserved by the Library of Congress and is regarded as a significant cultural and historical artifact of American cinema.

Crowd, The [VHS]
  • Eleanor Boardman, James Murray, Bert Roach (Actors)
  • King Vidor (Director) - Harry Behn (Writer) - Irving Thalberg (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

6. City Lights (1931)

“City Lights” is a silent romantic comedy-drama movie released in 1931, written, directed, produced by, and starring Charlie Chaplin.

The movie follows Chaplin’s iconic character, The Tramp, as he falls in love with a blind flower girl, played by Virginia Cherrill.

As The Tramp tries to win her heart, he also gets caught up in a series of comedic mishaps and misunderstandings, including a memorable boxing match and a mistaken identity at a high society party.

Throughout it all, he remains determined to help the flower girl, even if it means making sacrifices for her sake.

“City Lights” is known for its blend of slapstick comedy and poignant drama, with Chaplin’s trademark humor and pathos on full display. The movie also features a memorable score by Chaplin, which adds to the emotional impact of the story.

Despite being released after the advent of sound in cinema, “City Lights” was made as a silent movie, a testament to Chaplin’s dedication to the form.

The movie was a critical and commercial success upon its release and is now considered a classic of the silent era, as well as one of the greatest romantic comedies ever made.

City Lights
  • Virginia Cherrill, Harry Myers, Charles Chaplin (Actors)
  • Charles Chaplin (Director)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

7. Pandora’s Box (1929)

“Pandora’s Box” is a 1929 German silent film directed by Georg Wilhelm Pabst and starring Louise Brooks.

The film is based on two plays by Frank Wedekind and tells the story of a young woman named Lulu, who becomes the object of desire for multiple men and ultimately meets a tragic fate.

The film has been praised for its exploration of sexuality and gender roles, as well as its use of visual symbolism and expressionist cinematography.

Louise Brooks’ performance as Lulu has also been widely acclaimed, and she has been cited as one of the most iconic actresses of the silent era.

Upon its release, “Pandora’s Box” was controversial for its frank depiction of sexuality and its portrayal of a strong, independent woman who refuses to conform to societal norms.

It was banned in some countries and heavily censored in others, but has since become recognized as a classic of world cinema and an important work of feminist film theory.

Pandora's Box (The Criterion Collection)
  • Louise Brooks, Fritz Kortner, Francis Lederer (Actors)
  • Georg Wilhelm Pabst (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

8. The King of Kings (1927)

“The King of Kings” is a silent epic film released in 1927, directed by Cecil B. DeMille. The movie tells the story of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, from his birth in Bethlehem to his crucifixion and resurrection.

The film is notable for its grand scale and production values, which include elaborate sets, costumes, and special effects.

The movie’s depiction of Jesus and his teachings is respectful and reverent, and the film has been praised for its artistry and sincerity.

Despite its critical acclaim, “The King of Kings” was controversial at the time of its release, as some religious groups objected to the portrayal of Jesus on screen.

Nevertheless, the movie was a box office success and has since become a classic of early cinema. The film’s influence can be seen in many later depictions of Jesus and his teachings in film and television.

The King of Kings (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • H.B. Warner, Dorothy Cumming, Ernest Torrence (Actors)
  • Cecil B. DeMille (Director) - Jeanie Macpherson (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

9. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

“The Passion of Joan of Arc” is a silent film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer and released in 1928.

The movie is based on the trial and execution of Joan of Arc, a young French woman who claimed to have received divine visions and led the French army to several victories during the Hundred Years’ War.

The film focuses on Joan’s trial and the intense psychological and emotional pressure she experienced as she was interrogated and tortured by her captors.

Considered one of the greatest films of all time, “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is renowned for its innovative use of close-ups, which capture the nuanced expressions and emotions of the actors.

The film also features a powerful and moving performance by Maria Falconetti, who portrays Joan with remarkable intensity and conviction.

Despite its critical acclaim, “The Passion of Joan of Arc” was initially a commercial failure and suffered from censorship and controversy due to its sympathetic portrayal of a religious martyr.

However, the film’s reputation grew over time, and it is now considered a masterpiece of silent cinema and a landmark of world cinema.

The film’s influence can be seen in later works of cinema, such as Ingmar Bergman’s “The Seventh Seal” and Robert Bresson’s “Mouchette.”

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928) (Masters of Cinema) Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition
  • The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) ( La passion de Jeanne d'Arc ) (Blu-Ray & DVD Combo)
  • The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
  • La passion de Jeanne d'Arc
  • Maria Falconetti, Eugene Silvain, André Berley (Actors)
  • Carl Theodor Dreyer (Director) - The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) ( La passion de Jeanne d'Arc )...

10. Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1925)

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is a 1925 silent epic film directed by Fred Niblo and produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

The movie is an adaptation of the 1880 novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ by Lew Wallace, and tells the story of a Jewish prince named Judah Ben-Hur who is betrayed by his childhood friend, Messala, and sentenced to slavery.

After years of hardship, Ben-Hur returns to seek revenge and finds redemption through his encounters with Jesus Christ.

The film stars Ramon Novarro as Ben-Hur and Francis X. Bushman as Messala, with an all-star supporting cast. Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is widely regarded as one of the greatest films of the silent era and a masterpiece of epic filmmaking.

The movie was a major critical and commercial success and won a record-breaking 11 Academy Awards at the 1929 ceremony, including Best Picture.

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is notable for its grand scale, lavish production values, and impressive action sequences, including a famous chariot race sequence that is still considered one of the greatest scenes in film history.

The film’s themes of faith, justice, and forgiveness have also resonated with audiences for generations.

Ben-Hur: A Tale Of The Christ (1925)
  • Ramon Novarro, May McAvoy (Actors)
  • Fred Niblo (Director)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

11. The Big Parade (1925)

“The Big Parade” is a silent war drama film released in 1925, directed by King Vidor. The film tells the story of Jim Apperson, a young American soldier who is sent to fight in World War I in France.

The film is known for its realistic portrayal of war and its impact on soldiers, as well as for its depiction of the camaraderie and friendships that develop between soldiers.

The film’s epic battle scenes and emotional moments were groundbreaking at the time and helped set a new standard for war movies.

“The Big Parade” was also notable for its use of real-life war veterans as extras and consultants on the set. The film was a critical and commercial success and became one of the highest-grossing films of the silent era.

The film’s themes of sacrifice, loyalty, and the human cost of war have resonated with audiences and have made “The Big Parade” a classic of American cinema.

The Big Parade (1925)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • John Gilbert, Renée Adorée, Hobart Bosworth (Actors)
  • King Vidor (Director) - Harry Behn (Writer) - Kevin Brownlow (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

12. The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

“The Phantom of the Opera” is a 1925 American silent horror film directed by Rupert Julian and starring Lon Chaney Sr. as the Phantom.

The film is based on the novel of the same name by Gaston Leroux and follows a deformed composer who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing chaos and destruction as he becomes infatuated with a young soprano named Christine.

The film is known for its elaborate sets, costume design, and makeup effects, particularly Chaney’s iconic portrayal of the Phantom with his distorted face and trademark half-mask.

The film’s climax features a thrilling sequence in which the Phantom kidnaps Christine and takes her to his underground lair, where he reveals his love for her and his plan to keep her with him forever.

“The Phantom of the Opera” was a critical and commercial success, and is regarded as a landmark of American horror cinema. It has since been remade multiple times and has inspired numerous adaptations in film, television, and theater.

The film’s enduring popularity is a testament to its stunning visual effects, haunting storyline, and Chaney’s unforgettable performance.

The Phantom of the Opera - The Ultimate Edition (1925 Original Version and 1929 Restored Version) [DVD]
  • Lon Chaney, Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry (Actors)
  • Edward Sedgwick (Director) - Bernard McConville (Writer)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

13. He Who Gets Slapped (1924)

“He Who Gets Slapped” is a silent drama movie released in 1924, directed by Victor Sjöström and starring Lon Chaney, Norma Shearer, and John Gilbert.

The movie is based on a play by Leonid Andreyev and tells the story of a scientist named Paul Beaumont, played by Chaney, who is betrayed by his colleagues and loses everything he holds dear.

Beaumont becomes a circus clown known as “He Who Gets Slapped,” performing a routine where he is constantly slapped by other clowns.

He falls in love with the beautiful bareback rider Consuelo, played by Shearer, but faces competition from the arrogant and wealthy Count Mancini, played by Gilbert.

The movie explores themes of betrayal, revenge, and redemption, with Chaney delivering a powerful performance as the tormented and tragic Beaumont.

The movie also features impressive circus sequences and a memorable score by composer Carl Davis.

Despite being made during the silent era, “He Who Gets Slapped” has a timeless quality that continues to resonate with audiences today.

It is considered a classic of the era and a standout performance for Lon Chaney, who was known for his ability to portray complex and emotionally intense characters.

He Who Gets Slapped
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Lon Chaney, Norma Shearer, John Gilbert, Tully Marshall (Actor)
  • Victor Seastrom (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

14. Sherlock Jr. (1924)

“Sherlock Jr.” is a 1924 American silent comedy film directed by and starring Buster Keaton. The film follows a projectionist who dreams of becoming a detective and sets out to solve a crime that has been committed in real life.

The film is notable for its innovative special effects, which include Keaton’s character entering and exiting the film within the film, as well as other surreal and imaginative sequences.

It is also considered a classic example of Keaton’s unique brand of physical comedy, which is characterized by his deadpan expression and acrobatic stunts.

Upon its release, “Sherlock Jr.” was a critical and commercial success, and has since become recognized as one of the greatest films of the silent era.

It has been praised for its creativity, humor, and technical innovation, and has influenced countless filmmakers and comedians in the years since its release.

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15. The General (1926)

“The General” is a silent comedy film released in 1926, directed by Clyde Bruckman and Buster Keaton.

The movie is set during the American Civil War and follows a train engineer named Johnnie Gray, who tries to reclaim his stolen locomotive, “The General,” and rescue his girlfriend who is kidnapped by Union soldiers.

The film is notable for its inventive and thrilling action sequences, as well as its impressive use of physical comedy and visual gags.

Buster Keaton’s performance as Johnnie Gray has been praised for its athleticism and humor, and the movie has been widely acclaimed as one of the greatest comedies ever made.

Despite its initial commercial failure, “The General” has since been recognized as a masterpiece of silent cinema, and its influence on film comedy can be seen in many later films.

The movie’s use of trains as a symbol of American progress and ingenuity has also made it an important cultural artifact of its time.

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16. Flesh and the Devil (1926)

“Flesh and the Devil” is a silent romantic drama directed by Clarence Brown and released in 1926. The movie stars Greta Garbo and John Gilbert, who became one of Hollywood’s most famous on-screen couples.

The film tells the story of two childhood friends, Leo (Gilbert) and Ulrich (Lars Hanson), who become estranged when they both fall in love with the same woman, Felicitas (Garbo). The ensuing rivalry leads to a tragic ending.

Considered a classic of the silent era, “Flesh and the Devil” is praised for its lush cinematography, strong performances, and passionate storytelling.

The film’s central love triangle is explored with nuance and complexity, and the chemistry between Garbo and Gilbert is considered one of the highlights of the movie.

“Flesh and the Devil” was a commercial and critical success, and it helped solidify Garbo and Gilbert’s status as major stars in Hollywood.

The film’s success also led to a string of successful collaborations between Garbo and Gilbert, including “Love” (1927) and “A Woman of Affairs” (1928).

17. Show People (1928)

Show People is a 1928 silent comedy film directed by King Vidor and starring Marion Davies. The movie follows Peggy Pepper, a small-town girl who dreams of becoming a Hollywood star.

After a series of misadventures, Peggy gets her big break and becomes a successful actress, but struggles to maintain her integrity and authenticity in the cutthroat world of show business.

The film features cameos by many famous silent film stars of the time, including Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, William S. Hart, and many others.

Show People is notable for its clever satire of the film industry and its witty humor. The movie was a critical and commercial success, and is now considered a classic of the silent film era.

Show People is also notable for its use of early sound technology, including a brief scene with synchronized dialogue.

The film’s commentary on the role of sound in film foreshadowed the coming of the talkies, which would revolutionize the industry just a few years later.

Show People
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Marion Davies, William Haines (Actors)
  • King Vidor (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

18. The White Sister (1923)

“The White Sister” is a silent drama film released in 1923, directed by Henry King. The film tells the story of a young Italian woman named Angela who is forced to choose between her love for a man named Giovanni and her religious devotion to becoming a nun.

The film is known for its lush cinematography, intricate sets, and powerful performances, particularly by its lead actress, Lillian Gish.

“The White Sister” was a critical and commercial success upon its release and helped cement Gish’s status as one of the leading actresses of the silent era.

The film explores themes of love, faith, and sacrifice, as Angela struggles to reconcile her desire for a normal life with her commitment to her religious calling.

The film’s depiction of the conflict between religious devotion and personal desire has resonated with audiences over the years and has made “The White Sister” a classic of silent cinema.

19. Diary of a Lost Girl (1929)

Diary of a Lost Girl” is a 1929 German silent film directed by Georg Wilhelm Pabst and starring Louise Brooks in the lead role.

The film is based on the novel of the same name by Margarete Böhme and follows the story of a young woman named Thymian (Brooks) who is sent to a reformatory after becoming pregnant out of wedlock.

The film explores themes of sexuality, morality, and social norms, as Thymian is forced to navigate a society that punishes women for straying from traditional gender roles.

Throughout the film, Thymian faces a series of injustices and abuses, but ultimately finds a way to assert her independence and reclaim her identity.

“Diary of a Lost Girl” was notable for its frank depiction of sexuality and its sympathetic portrayal of a young woman struggling against societal oppression.

The film was also praised for Brooks’ performance, which is widely regarded as one of her best. Despite being initially banned in some countries, the film has since become a classic of the silent era and is regarded as a landmark of feminist cinema.

Diary of a Lost Girl (1929 Film)
  • Released on EMI in Greece in 1997
  • Audio CD – Audiobook
  • EMI / Minos (Publisher)

20. Broken Blossoms (1919)

“Broken Blossoms” is a silent drama movie released in 1919, directed by D.W. Griffith and starring Lillian Gish, Richard Barthelmess, and Donald Crisp.

The movie tells the story of a young girl named Lucy, played by Gish, who lives with her abusive father, played by Crisp, in the slums of London.

Lucy is rescued by a Chinese man named Cheng Huan, played by Barthelmess, who is a peaceful and compassionate man despite facing discrimination and violence from the people around him.

Cheng Huan takes Lucy under his wing and tries to protect her from her father’s abuse, leading to a tender and emotional relationship between the two.

“Broken Blossoms” is a powerful and poignant movie that explores themes of love, compassion, and the effects of violence and abuse.

It is also notable for its groundbreaking use of close-ups and intimate camerawork, which helped to establish Griffith as one of the greatest directors of the silent era.

The movie was a critical and commercial success upon its release and is now considered a classic of the silent era, as well as one of the greatest dramas ever made.

Lillian Gish’s performance is particularly noteworthy, as she captures the vulnerability and strength of her character with remarkable sensitivity and nuance.

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Broken Blossoms (Deluxe Edition)
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Lillian Gish, Richard Barthelmess, Donald Crisp (Actors)
  • D.W. Griffith (Director) - D.W. Griffith (Writer)
  • Spanish (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

3 Characteristics of Silent Movies

Lack of synchronized sound: Silent movies did not have synchronized sound, meaning that there was no dialogue or synchronized sound effects. Music was often played during screenings, either by an orchestra or from a recorded source.

Visual storytelling: Silent movies relied heavily on visual storytelling, using a combination of cinematography, acting, and intertitles (text on screen) to convey the plot, characters, and emotions.

Actors had to rely on exaggerated gestures and expressions to convey their emotions, as they couldn’t rely on spoken dialogue.

Intertitles: Intertitles were used to convey dialogue, thoughts, or narration. These were short pieces of text displayed on screen, often accompanied by illustrations or decorative elements.

Intertitles were an important part of silent movies, as they helped bridge gaps in the narrative and provided important context for the audience.

3 Reasons To Watch Silent Movies

Historical Importance: Silent movies were the foundation of the film industry and represent an important chapter in the history of cinema.

By watching silent movies, viewers can gain an appreciation for the artistry, innovation, and technical achievements of early filmmakers, as well as an understanding of the cultural and social context in which these films were made.

Artistic Expression: Silent movies relied heavily on visual storytelling, using techniques such as lighting, camera angles, and composition to convey emotion and meaning.

By watching silent movies, viewers can experience a different kind of cinematic artistry and storytelling, one that relies more heavily on the visual than the verbal.

Cultural Relevance: Despite the lack of spoken dialogue, many silent movies tackled themes and issues that are still relevant today, such as social inequality, war, and human relationships.

By watching silent movies, viewers can gain a deeper understanding of the cultural and historical context in which these issues arose, and can see how filmmakers of the time used their art to explore and comment on these issues.

Best Silent Movies – Wrap Up

The silent film era may have been a long time ago, but its impact on cinema is undeniable.

From pioneering techniques in cinematography to exploring themes of love, ambition, and societal pressure, silent movies have paved the way for modern-day films and continue to captivate audiences around the world.

Some of the best silent movies of all time include “The General” (1926), “City Lights” (1931), “Nosferatu” (1922), “Metropolis” (1927), “Sunrise” (1927), and “The Kid” (1921).

Each film has made a lasting impression on cinema history, and continues to be celebrated for its innovative techniques, compelling storylines, and unforgettable characters.

Whether you’re a cinephile or just looking to broaden your horizons, watching silent movies is a great way to appreciate the artistry and creativity of early filmmakers.

With their emphasis on visual storytelling and universal themes, silent movies have something to offer everyone, and are sure to leave a lasting impression on those who watch them.