Alejandro Jodorowsky is a Chilean-French filmmaker, playwright, actor, author, and spiritual guru who is known for his surrealist, avant-garde, and psychedelic films.

Here are three of his best films that showcase his unique vision and style:

“El Topo” (1970): Considered a cult classic and one of the most influential films of the 1970s, “El Topo” is a surreal Western that blends elements of the spiritual, mystical, and violent.

The film follows a gunslinger named El Topo (played by Jodorowsky) as he travels through a desert landscape, encountering various characters and engaging in bizarre and violent acts.

“The Holy Mountain” (1973): Another surreal and visionary film from Jodorowsky, “The Holy Mountain” is a psychedelic journey that explores the nature of reality, spirituality, and humanity.

The film follows a group of individuals who seek spiritual enlightenment and embark on a quest to climb a holy mountain.

“Santa Sangre” (1989): “Santa Sangre” is a haunting and unforgettable film that combines elements of horror, drama, and surrealism.

The film tells the story of a young man who, after witnessing a traumatic event, becomes involved in his family’s circus and their bizarre and macabre performances.

All three of these films showcase Jodorowsky’s unique vision, blending surrealism, spirituality, and violence to create unforgettable cinematic experiences.

Best Alejandro Jodorowsky Films

Let’s take a look at the top Alejandro Jodorowsky movies.

1. El Topo (1970)

“El Topo” is a 1970 cult classic film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is often regarded as a masterpiece of surrealism and has gained a cult following for its bizarre and visionary storytelling.

The film is a blend of Western and religious allegory and follows the journey of a gunfighter named El Topo, who is played by Jodorowsky himself.

The film is divided into two parts, with the first part following El Topo as he goes on a mission to find and kill four sharpshooters who are known as “the masters.”

The second part of the film follows El Topo as he becomes a spiritual leader, leading a group of misfits on a journey to seek enlightenment in a mystical underground city.

   

“El Topo” is known for its surrealistic imagery, heavy use of religious symbolism, and its graphic violence and sexual content.

The film is often interpreted as an allegory for the search for spiritual enlightenment and the battle between good and evil.

“El Topo” has been praised for its bold and visionary storytelling, and has influenced many other filmmakers with its unique style and approach to cinema.

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El Topo
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky, Brontis Jodorowsky, José Legarreta (Actors)
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky (Director)
  • English, Spanish, Portuguese Brazilian, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

2. The Holy Mountain (1973)

“The Holy Mountain” is a 1973 surrealist fantasy film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is an avant-garde exploration of spirituality, alchemy, and the occult, and is known for its bizarre and visually stunning imagery.

The film follows a thief (played by Jodorowsky) who embarks on a journey with a group of seven individuals who represent the planets of the solar system, in search of the Holy Mountain, which is said to contain the secrets of immortality and enlightenment.

Along the way, they encounter various bizarre and surreal characters and situations, including an alchemist, a group of human birds, and a machine that turns feces into gold.

“The Holy Mountain” is known for its striking and imaginative visuals, which are heavily influenced by occult and mystical traditions.

The film is also famous for its use of vivid colors, surreal landscapes, and symbolic imagery, all of which help to create an otherworldly and dreamlike atmosphere.

Despite its unconventional narrative and structure, “The Holy Mountain” has been praised for its philosophical and spiritual themes, as well as its bold and innovative approach to filmmaking.

The film has become a cult classic and is considered a masterpiece of surrealist cinema.

The Holy Mountain
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky (Director)
  • English, Spanish, Portuguese Brazilian, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

3. Santa Sangre (1989)

“Santa Sangre” is a 1989 Mexican-Italian horror film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is a haunting and surreal tale of madness, murder, and resurrection.

The film follows Fenix, a young man who is haunted by traumatic memories of his childhood. His mother was a trapeze artist at a circus called the “Circus of the Graces,” which was run by his father, a religious cult leader.

Fenix’s father becomes jealous of his mother’s affair with the strongman of the circus and cuts off both her arms as an act of revenge. The traumatized Fenix is then confined to a mental institution.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpl8bWYk5RU

Years later, Fenix escapes from the institution and returns to the circus, where he is reunited with his mother, who now has her arms amputated. The two begin a twisted and macabre journey of revenge, murder, and resurrection.

“Santa Sangre” is a visually striking and haunting film, known for its surrealistic imagery and use of religious symbolism.

It explores themes of trauma, madness, and the search for redemption. The film is often regarded as one of Jodorowsky’s masterpieces and has been praised for its unique blend of horror, surrealism, and art-house cinema.

Santa Sangre [Blu-ray]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Axel Jodorowsky, Blanca Guerra, Guy Stockwell (Actors)
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

4. The Dance of Reality (2013)

“The Dance of Reality” is a 2013 surrealist drama film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is a semi-autobiographical account of Jodorowsky’s childhood in Chile, and explores themes of family, identity, and the role of imagination in shaping our perceptions of reality.

The film follows a young Jodorowsky (played by Jeremias Herskovits) as he grows up in a small town in Chile with his parents, who are both eccentric and often abusive.

Through a series of surreal and dreamlike events, Jodorowsky discovers his own identity and develops a unique perspective on the world.

   

“The Dance of Reality” is known for its vivid and colorful visuals, which are heavily influenced by Jodorowsky’s interest in surrealism and mystical traditions.

The film also features a mix of real-life and fantastical elements, as well as an eclectic soundtrack that includes original music composed by Jodorowsky himself.

Despite its often surreal and experimental nature, “The Dance of Reality” has been praised for its emotional depth and its ability to explore complex themes in a poetic and imaginative way.

The film is a powerful and thought-provoking meditation on the nature of reality, memory, and the power of the human imagination.

The Dance of Reality
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky, Brontis Jodorowsky, Adan Jodorowsky (Actors)
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky (Director) - Alejandro Jodorowsky (Producer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

5. Endless Poetry (2016)

“Endless Poetry” is a 2016 autobiographical film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is a vibrant and surrealistic exploration of art, love, and the creative spirit.

The film follows Jodorowsky’s youth in Chile as a poet and his eventual move to France. The film is divided into two parts, with the first part following Jodorowsky as he rebels against his oppressive father and his desire to be a poet.

The second part of the film follows Jodorowsky as he falls in love, meets other artists, and becomes a key figure in the avant-garde art movement.

“Endless Poetry” is known for its surrealistic and poetic imagery, its exploration of Jodorowsky’s personal history and experiences, and its themes of artistic expression and self-discovery.

The film features a diverse cast of characters, including a dwarf, a transvestite, and a group of poets, artists, and musicians. The film also incorporates Jodorowsky’s trademark use of religious and mystical symbolism.

“Endless Poetry” has been praised for its beautiful and imaginative visuals, its bold and audacious storytelling, and its powerful message about the importance of artistic expression and the human spirit.

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Endless Poetry (Poesia Sin Fin)
  • Jodorowsky, Adan, Jodorowsky, Brontis, Flores, Pamela (Actors)
  • Jodorowsky, Alejandro (Director)

6. Psychomagic, A Healing Art (2019)

“Psychomagic, A Healing Art” is a 2019 documentary film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is an exploration of Jodorowsky’s unique approach to therapy, which he calls “psychomagic.”

In the film, Jodorowsky explains that psychomagic is a form of therapy that uses art and performance to help individuals overcome trauma and emotional pain.

The film follows Jodorowsky as he works with a number of different patients, using a variety of techniques and methods to help them confront and work through their psychological issues.

Throughout the film, Jodorowsky shares his own personal history and experiences with therapy, as well as his insights into the nature of creativity and the role of art in healing.

The film is a fascinating and thought-provoking exploration of the power of the human mind and the potential for healing through creativity and imagination.

“Psychomagic, A Healing Art” is a unique and unconventional documentary that showcases Jodorowsky’s visionary approach to therapy and his deep understanding of the human psyche.

The film is a powerful reminder of the importance of art and creativity in our lives, and the potential for healing and transformation that they can provide.

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Psychomagic, A Healing Art
  • Alejandro Jodorowsky (Director)

7. Fando and Lis (1968)

“Fando and Lis” is a 1968 Mexican avant-garde film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film is a surrealistic and controversial exploration of love, desire, and societal norms.

The film is based on a play by Fernando Arrabal and follows the journey of a young couple, Fando and Lis, as they search for the mythical city of Tar.

Along the way, they encounter a series of strange and disturbing characters, including a woman who speaks with her disembodied head and a man who has been crucified.

“Fando and Lis” is known for its striking and provocative imagery, its use of taboo and controversial themes, and its rejection of traditional narrative structure.

The film has been praised for its experimental approach to filmmaking and its influence on the development of avant-garde cinema.

The film’s controversial content and scenes led to it being banned in Mexico and other countries, but it has since gained a cult following for its bold and unconventional storytelling.

“Fando and Lis” is considered a significant work in Jodorowsky’s filmography and an important example of avant-garde cinema.

8. The Rainbow Thief (1990)

“The Rainbow Thief” is a 1990 drama film directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The film stars Peter O’Toole as a wealthy businessman named Uncle Rudolf, who is searching for the elixir of life in the hopes of achieving immortality.

During his search, Uncle Rudolf encounters a homeless man named Fevrier (played by Omar Sharif), who is known as the “Rainbow Thief” because of his ability to steal and redistribute wealth.

The two men strike up an unlikely friendship, and Uncle Rudolf begins to see the world in a new way as he becomes more involved in Fevrier’s world.

“The Rainbow Thief” is a visually stunning film that explores themes of wealth, power, and the search for meaning in life.

The film is known for its striking imagery, which is heavily influenced by Jodorowsky’s interest in mystical and spiritual traditions.

The film is also notable for its strong performances from O’Toole and Sharif, who bring depth and nuance to their respective characters.

Despite its sometimes surreal and abstract nature, “The Rainbow Thief” is a powerful and emotional exploration of the human condition, and the search for meaning and purpose in a world that can often feel chaotic and uncertain.

The film is a testament to Jodorowsky’s unique vision and his ability to create thought-provoking and visually stunning works of art.

The Rainbow Thief
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

9. Tusk (1980)

“Tusk” is a 1980 horror film directed by David Ivy and written by Ivy and Chris Lambert. The film follows a group of tourists who are stranded on a remote island, where they are hunted by a crazed millionaire who has trained a group of walruses to kill for him.

The film stars Gary Busey, who plays the role of a guide who takes the tourists to the island. The tourists include a photojournalist, a marine biologist, and a college student.

Once they arrive on the island, they quickly discover that they are not alone and that they are being hunted by the millionaire and his deadly walruses.

“Tusk” is known for its bizarre and gruesome premise, as well as its graphic violence and disturbing scenes.

The film has gained a cult following for its over-the-top approach to horror and its campy and often unintentionally hilarious dialogue and acting.

Despite being a commercial and critical failure upon its initial release, “Tusk” has since become a beloved cult classic and has been reevaluated by some critics as an example of 1980s B-movie horror cinema.

3 Characteristics of Alejandro Jodorowsky Films

Alejandro Jodorowsky is known for his unique and provocative approach to filmmaking, and his films are characterized by several distinctive traits.

Here are three key characteristics of Alejandro Jodorowsky films:

Surreal and visionary imagery: Jodorowsky’s films are renowned for their striking and often surreal imagery, which often draws on mystical and spiritual traditions from around the world.

He frequently employs dreamlike and hallucinatory visuals to create a sense of otherworldliness and to explore themes of spirituality and the subconscious.

Emphasis on personal and emotional transformation: Jodorowsky’s films often explore themes of personal transformation and self-discovery, and his characters are frequently on a journey of emotional and psychological growth.

He is known for his interest in the role of art and creativity in personal transformation, and his films often feature a wide range of symbolic and metaphorical elements that are designed to provoke thought and introspection.

Blending of genres and styles: Jodorowsky is known for his ability to blend together different genres and styles in his films, creating a unique and often unpredictable viewing experience.

His films often draw on elements of surrealism, fantasy, science fiction, and horror, and he is known for his unconventional and experimental approach to storytelling.

Jodorowsky’s films frequently blur the lines between reality and fantasy, and he is unafraid to challenge traditional narrative structures and storytelling conventions.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch Alejandro Jodorowsky Films

Alejandro Jodorowsky is a visionary filmmaker who has made a significant impact on the world of cinema. Here are three reasons why you should watch his films:

Unique and unconventional storytelling: Jodorowsky’s films are renowned for their unconventional and often surreal approach to storytelling.

His films frequently explore themes of spirituality, personal transformation, and the nature of the human experience, and they are filled with symbolic and metaphorical elements that challenge viewers to think deeply and reflect on their own lives.

If you are looking for films that are not afraid to take risks and push boundaries, Jodorowsky’s work is an excellent choice.

Visually stunning imagery: Jodorowsky’s films are known for their stunning and often surreal imagery, which draws on a wide range of artistic and spiritual traditions.

His films feature elaborate and imaginative set designs, intricate costumes, and stunning cinematography that transport viewers to other worlds and challenge their perceptions of reality.

If you are looking for visually striking and thought-provoking cinema, Jodorowsky’s films are a must-see.

Powerful and emotionally resonant themes: Jodorowsky’s films are not just visually stunning, they also explore deep and meaningful themes that resonate with viewers on a personal level.

His films are often meditations on the human experience, exploring themes of personal transformation, spirituality, and the search for meaning and purpose in life.

Jodorowsky’s films are full of emotion and heart, and they offer viewers a unique and powerful perspective on the world and our place in it.

Best Alejandro Jodorowsky Films – Wrapping Up

Alejandro Jodorowsky is a visionary filmmaker who has made a significant impact on the world of cinema. His films are characterized by their unique and often surreal approach to storytelling, their stunning imagery, and their exploration of deep and meaningful themes.

Here are some of his best-known films:

“El Topo” (1970): This Western-inspired film is perhaps Jodorowsky’s best-known work, and it explores themes of violence, power, and spirituality.

The film is full of striking imagery and surreal twists and turns, and it has become a cult classic.

“The Holy Mountain” (1973): This film is a surreal and visually stunning meditation on spirituality and the search for enlightenment.

It features a wide range of symbolic and metaphorical elements, and it challenges viewers to think deeply about their own beliefs and values.

“Santa Sangre” (1989): This horror film tells the story of a man who becomes involved in a bizarre and terrifying cult.

It explores themes of trauma, memory, and the nature of reality, and it features Jodorowsky’s trademark surreal imagery and creative storytelling.

“The Dance of Reality” (2013): This autobiographical film explores Jodorowsky’s own childhood and his relationship with his father.

It is a powerful and emotionally resonant film that showcases Jodorowsky’s unique vision and his ability to create deeply personal and moving works of art.

Jodorowsky’s films are not for everyone, but for those who are interested in experimental and thought-provoking cinema, his work is a must-see.

His films challenge viewers to think deeply about the human experience and our place in the world, and they offer a unique and powerful perspective on the nature of reality and the search for meaning and purpose in life.