A spaghetti western is a subgenre of the Western, which was popularized in Italy during the mid-1960s.

The term refers to low budget Western films produced in Europe between 1963 and 1978 that were influenced by Italian culture and often featured American actors dubbed into European languages.

 

BEST SPAGHETTI WESTERN MOVIES

What Are Spaghetti Western Movies?

Spaghetti westerns are a subgenre of the western that emerged in the 1960s.

Spaghetti westerns were typically low-budget affairs filmed on location in Spain or Italy and directed by Italians.

Sergio Leone was one of the foremost spaghetti western filmmakers.

They’re characterized by their irreverent humor, violence, and anti-authoritarianism.

What Is A Spaghetti Western?

Spaghetti Westerns are a genre of Italian Western film that were popular in the 1960’s and 1970s.

They have their roots in Sergio Leone’s Once Upon A Time In The West, which was released in 1968.

This movie is considered to be one of the greatest films ever made and it set off an international wave of imitation films from Europe, Japan, China and America that lasted until about 1980.

In these movies, oftentimes there is a man with no name (a drifter), who enters a town where two gangs are fighting for control and becomes involved in the power struggle by taking on a job as a hired gun.

Along the way, he meets various women who either help or hinder him along his journey to find justice or revenge

A spaghetti western is a genre of Italian-made Westerns that emerged in the 1960s.

The term was coined by American critic and historian Harry M. Caudill to describe this type of low-budget, high levels of violence, and gritty style of Western films.

Here’s our introduction to spaghetti westerns covering the history and evolution of the genre:

   

Best Spaghetti Western Movies

The spaghetti westerns are often regarded as the “low budget” version of the Hollywood Western.

They were made in Europe, primarily Italy and Spain, between 1960-1980.

Spaghetti westerns tell a story of revenge in an arid landscape where life is cheap and violence is brutal.

The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (Sergio Leone, 1966)

“The Good, The Bad And The Ugly” is a 1966 epic spaghetti western directed by Sergio Leone.

The film follows three gunslingers, Blondie (Clint Eastwood), Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef), and Tuco (Eli Wallach), as they search for a cache of buried Confederate gold during the American Civil War.

The film is known for its iconic score by Ennio Morricone, memorable set pieces, and charismatic performances from its lead actors.

Clint Eastwood’s stoic and cool portrayal of Blondie is the epitome of the classic western hero, while Lee Van Cleef’s menacing Angel Eyes provides a perfect foil.

Eli Wallach’s Tuco is a comedic and tragic figure, creating a perfect balance of humor and pathos.

Leone’s direction is masterful, creating tension and suspense through his use of long takes and extreme close-ups.

The film’s climax, a three-way Mexican standoff, is one of the most famous scenes in film history.

“The Good, The Bad And The Ugly” is an epic masterpiece of cinema, a perfect example of the genre it represents, and a landmark achievement in filmmaking.

It has inspired countless filmmakers and remains a timeless classic.

   
The Good, The Bad and the Ugly
  • Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, Lee Van Cleef (Actors)
  • Sergio Leone (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

For A Few Dollars More (Sergio Leone, 1965)

For a Few Dollars More, the second installment in Sergio Leone’s iconic “Dollars Trilogy,” is a masterclass in stylish and suspenseful filmmaking.

Clint Eastwood reprises his role as the stoic “Man with No Name,” this time teaming up with Lee Van Cleef’s equally deadly bounty hunter in pursuit of a notorious outlaw named Indio (Gian Maria Volontè).

The film’s plot is deceptively simple, but Leone’s meticulous attention to detail and flair for the dramatic make every scene feel essential.

From the hypnotic opening credits sequence to the explosive finale, For a Few Dollars More is a showcase for the director’s signature style – sweeping camera movements, striking close-ups, and a meticulously crafted soundscape that emphasizes every gunshot and clinking spur.

While Eastwood and Van Cleef make for a formidable duo, it’s Volontè’s performance as the cunning and ruthless Indio that steals the show.

His dynamic presence on screen is matched only by Ennio Morricone’s unforgettable score, which includes the iconic whistling theme that has become synonymous with the spaghetti western genre.

For a Few Dollars More (Special Edition) [Blu-ray]
  • Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, Gian Maria Volontè (Actors)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

Django (Sergio Corbucci, 1966)

“Django” is a Italian spaghetti Western directed by Sergio Corbucci.

The film stars Franco Nero as Django, a mysterious drifter who arrives in a town torn apart by violence and greed.

   

When Django gets involved with a prostitute named Maria, played by Loredana Nusciak, he becomes embroiled in a war between two rival gangs.

With the help of a Gatling gun and his sharpshooting skills, Django sets out to bring justice to the town.

The film is known for its gritty violence, dark humor, and unforgettable soundtrack by Ennio Morricone.

It has been cited as an inspiration for many filmmakers and has achieved cult status among fans of the Western genre.

Django’s iconic look, with his black coat, hat, and bandana covering his face, has become a symbol of rebellion and resistance.

Despite its controversial content, “Django” has earned its place as a classic of the spaghetti Western genre.

It features compelling characters, stunning cinematography, and a timeless story of revenge and redemption.

For fans of the Western genre, “Django” is a must-see film that continues to captivate audiences with its raw intensity and unforgettable style.

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Django (Special Edition) [Blu-ray]
  • Franco Nero, Loredana Nusciak, José Bódalo (Actors)
  • Sergio Corbucci (Director)

The Mercenary (Sergio Corbucci, 1968)

Once Upon a Time in the West, directed by Sergio Leone, is a masterful Western that is considered by many to be one of the greatest films of all time.

The movie follows a mysterious stranger known as “Harmonica” (Charles Bronson) as he teams up with a notorious outlaw named Cheyenne (Jason Robards) and a widow named Jill (Claudia Cardinale) to protect a valuable piece of land from a ruthless railroad baron (Henry Fonda) and his gang of thugs.

The film is visually stunning, with Leone’s signature close-ups and wide shots capturing the vast landscapes of the American West.

Ennio Morricone’s haunting score perfectly complements the film’s atmosphere of tension and unease.

What sets Once Upon a Time in the West apart from other Westerns is its exploration of themes such as greed, power, and revenge.

The characters are complex and morally ambiguous, with each one driven by their own motivations and desires.

The film’s ending is both shocking and poignant, leaving a lasting impact on viewers.

Overall, Once Upon a Time in the West is a cinematic masterpiece that showcases the best of the Western genre while also pushing its boundaries.

It is a must-see for fans of the genre and for anyone who appreciates great filmmaking.

The Mercenary
  • Franco Nero, Tony Musante, Jack Palance (Actors)
  • Sergio Corbucci (Director)
  • Audience Rating: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)

Once Upon A Time In The West (Sergio Leone, 1968)

A Fistful of Dollars, released in, is a classic Spaghetti Western directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood in his breakthrough role.

The film tells the story of a mysterious stranger (Eastwood) who arrives in a small Mexican border town, where two rival families are at war over control of the town’s resources.

The stranger, nicknamed “The Man with No Name,” sees an opportunity to profit from the feud and plays both sides against each other.

As The Man with No Name becomes more involved in the town’s affairs, he discovers a beautiful woman caught in the middle of the conflict and sets out to protect her.

He also uncovers a dark secret about the feud that puts him in even greater danger.

With its iconic score, memorable characters, and breathtaking action sequences, A Fistful of Dollars is a masterpiece of the Western genre.

Leone’s direction is stylish and innovative, using extreme close-ups, long shots, and other techniques to create a tense and atmospheric mood.

Eastwood’s performance as the cool and cunning antihero is unforgettable, and he would go on to star in two more films as The Man with No Name.

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Once Upon A Time In America [Blu-ray]
  • Once Upon A Time In America - Blu-ray + Digital HD Brand New
  • Tuesday Weld, Treat Williams, Robert De Niro (Actors)
  • Sergio Leone (Director) - Arnon Milchan (Producer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

A Fistful Of Dollars (Sergio Leone, 1964)

Day of Anger is a classic spaghetti western film from 1967 directed by Tonino Valerii.

The movie stars Lee Van Cleef as a veteran gunfighter named Frank Talby who takes a young and timid street sweeper named Scott (Giuliano Gemma) under his wing and trains him to become a skilled gunfighter.

Set in the fictional town of Clifton, Arizona, the film follows Scott as he navigates the harsh realities of the Wild West and learns the ropes from Talby, a ruthless and cunning gunslinger.

As Scott becomes more confident and skilled, he begins to see the darker side of Talby’s personality and starts to question his mentor’s intentions.

The film features some stunning cinematography and a gripping story that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

The performances by Van Cleef and Gemma are outstanding, and the chemistry between the two actors is palpable.

Day of Anger is a must-watch for fans of the spaghetti western genre and anyone who loves a good old-fashioned shoot-out.

With its fast-paced action, tense plot, and memorable characters, this film is a true classic that has stood the test of time.

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The Man With No Name Trilogy [Blu-ray]
  • English, English, French (Subtitles)

Day Of Anger (Tonino Valerii, 1967)

“Death Rides a Horse” is a Spaghetti Western directed by Giulio Petroni.

The film stars Lee Van Cleef as Ryan, an aging gunslinger who has spent 15 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

As he seeks revenge on those who framed him, he meets Bill (John Phillip Law), a young man whose family was murdered when he was a child.

Together, they embark on a journey to track down the men responsible for their respective tragedies.

The film is a classic example of the Spaghetti Western genre, with its iconic landscape shots, brutal violence, and memorable characters. Lee Van Cleef delivers a fantastic performance as Ryan, the grizzled and hardened gunslinger who is willing to do whatever it takes to get revenge.

John Phillip Law is equally impressive as Bill, the young man driven by his need for vengeance.

What sets “Death Rides a Horse” apart from other Spaghetti Westerns is its exploration of themes such as revenge, redemption, and the corrupting influence of power.

The film’s ending is particularly powerful, leaving audiences with a sense of ambiguity and questioning the true nature of justice.

But Noonan will not give up so easily…

Day of Anger [Blu-ray]
  • Lee Van Cleef, Giuliano Gemma (Actors)
  • Tonino Valerii (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Death Rides A Horse (Giulio Petroni, 1967)

“Death Rides a Horse” is a Spaghetti Western directed by Giulio Petroni.

The film stars Lee Van Cleef as Ryan, an aging gunslinger who has spent 15 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit.

As he seeks revenge on those who framed him, he meets Bill (John Phillip Law), a young man whose family was murdered when he was a child.

Together, they embark on a journey to track down the men responsible for their respective tragedies.

The film is a classic example of the Spaghetti Western genre, with its iconic landscape shots, brutal violence, and memorable characters.

Lee Van Cleef delivers a fantastic performance as Ryan, the grizzled and hardened gunslinger who is willing to do whatever it takes to get revenge.

John Phillip Law is equally impressive as Bill, the young man driven by his need for vengeance.

What sets “Death Rides a Horse” apart from other Spaghetti Westerns is its exploration of themes such as revenge, redemption, and the corrupting influence of power.

The film’s ending is particularly powerful, leaving audiences with a sense of ambiguity and questioning the true nature of justice.

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Death Rides a Horse
  • Lee Van Cleef, John Phillip Law, Mario Brega (Actors)
  • Giulio Petroni (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

Navajo Joe (Sergio Corbucci, 1966)

Navajo Joe is a Spaghetti Western directed by Sergio Corbucci and starring Burt Reynolds in his first leading role.

The film follows Navajo Joe, a Native American who seeks revenge against a group of bandits who massacred his tribe.

The film begins with a brutal attack on a Navajo tribe by a group of bandits led by Duncan (Aldo Sambrell). Navajo Joe (Burt Reynolds), the only survivor, sets out to seek vengeance against the bandits.

Along the way, he meets and allies himself with a group of Mexican revolutionaries, who are also being targeted by the same bandits.

Together, they plan to take down Duncan and his gang.

Navajo Joe is a classic Spaghetti Western with all the tropes you’d expect: a lone hero seeking revenge, gunfights, and a final showdown.

Burt Reynolds delivers a great performance as the stoic Navajo Joe, and the film is filled with memorable supporting characters, including the Mexican revolutionaries and the sadistic bandits.

The film’s action scenes are well-executed, with Corbucci’s signature use of extreme close-ups and intense violence.

The film’s score, composed by Ennio Morricone, is also excellent and helps to create a tense and foreboding atmosphere.

 

Navajo Joe [Blu-ray]
  • Western from 1966 by Sergio Corbucci with Burt Reynolds and Aldo Sambrell.
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

The Return Of Ringo (Duccio Tessari, 1965)

“The Return of Ringo” is a spaghetti western directed by Duccio Tessari and starring Giuliano Gemma.

The film follows a Civil War veteran, Captain Montgomery Brown (Gemma), who returns home to find his town under the control of a Mexican gang led by Paco (Fernando Sancho).

Montgomery discovers that his family has been killed, and his wife, Hally (Lorella De Luca), has been taken by Paco.

In order to take revenge and retrieve his wife, Montgomery assumes the identity of a Mexican bandit named Ringo and joins Paco’s gang.

As Ringo, Montgomery rises through the ranks of Paco’s gang and gains his trust.

He discovers that Paco was responsible for the deaths of his family and sets out to take his revenge.

The film builds to a climactic showdown between Montgomery and Paco, with Hally’s fate hanging in the balance.

“The Return of Ringo” is a well-crafted and entertaining spaghetti western, with strong performances from Gemma and Sancho.

The film features the classic elements of the genre, including gunfights, horseback chases, and themes of revenge and redemption.

The cinematography and music are also noteworthy, with beautiful shots of the Italian countryside and a memorable score by Ennio Morricone.

 

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A Pistol for Ringo & The Return of Ringo: Two Films by Duccio Tessari (Special Edition) [Blu-ray]
  • Giuliano Gemma, Fernando Sancho, Lorella De Luca (Actors)
  • Duccio Tessari (Director)

The Big Gundown (Sergio Sollima, 1966)

The Big Gundown (Sergio Sollima, 1966) film The Big Gundown (Italian:

La resa dei conti, “The Settling of Scores”), also known as Run, Man, Run, is a 1966 Italian spaghetti western directed by Sergio Sollima.

The film stars Lee Van Cleef as bounty hunter Jonathan Corbett and Tomas Milian as Cuchillo Sanchez (aka “Knife Sanchez”), the Mexican bandit whom he pursues.

The film’s score is by Ennio Morricone. It was shot in Almería (Spain), Mexico and Italy.

This was the first spaghetti western scored by Ennio Morricone to feature his trademark whistle theme for the main character.

This theme would reappear in many of Morricone’s later westerns such as A Fistful of Dynamite (also starring Van Cleef) and Once Upon a Time in the West.

Morricone also composed several jazz pieces for this film, a rarity for him at the time.

A Pistol For Ringo (Duccio Tessari, 1965)

“A Pistol for Ringo” is a classic spaghetti western directed by Duccio Tessari and stars Giuliano Gemma as the titular character, Ringo.

When a band of Mexican bandits takes a wealthy family hostage, the local sheriff enlists the help of Ringo to save them.

Ringo is a skilled gunslinger who agrees to help the sheriff in exchange for his freedom from jail.

He infiltrates the bandit’s hideout and begins to win their trust by showing off his marksmanship and helping them pull off a heist.

However, Ringo has his own agenda, and he’s not afraid to double-cross those who stand in his way.

The film is an excellent example of the spaghetti western genre, known for its gritty realism, stylized violence, and anti-hero protagonists.

Gemma’s performance as Ringo is captivating, and the supporting cast, including Fernando Sancho and Lorella De Luca, adds depth and complexity to the story.

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A Pistol for Ringo & The Return of Ringo: Two Films by Duccio Tessari (Special Edition) [Blu-ray]
  • Giuliano Gemma, Fernando Sancho, Lorella De Luca (Actors)
  • Duccio Tessari (Director)

The Dirty Outlaws (Franco Rossetti, 1967)

“The Dirty Outlaws”is a spaghetti western directed by Franco Rossetti.

The film follows a gang of ruthless bandits led by a psychopath named Duncan who terrorize a small Mexican town.

When the bandits rape and kill a young woman, a drifter named Jeff sets out to avenge her death.

Starring Andrea Giordana as Jeff, the film is a gritty and violent portrayal of the Wild West.

The movie features many of the classic elements of the genre, including shootouts, horseback chases, and rugged landscapes.

What sets “The Dirty Outlaws” apart is its emphasis on character development.

Jeff is a complex figure, torn between his desire for revenge and his sense of justice. Duncan, on the other hand, is a sadistic and unpredictable villain, capable of extreme acts of violence.

The film also explores themes of morality and the consequences of violence.

As Jeff gets closer to his goal, he begins to question the true cost of revenge.

 

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A Pistol for Ringo & The Return of Ringo: Two Films by Duccio Tessari (Special Edition) [Blu-ray]
  • Giuliano Gemma, Fernando Sancho, Lorella De Luca (Actors)
  • Duccio Tessari (Director)

The Great Silence (Sergio Corbucci, 1968)

“The Great Silence” is a classic Spaghetti Western directed by Sergio Corbucci in.

Set in the snowy mountains of Utah during the 1890s, the film follows a skilled and ruthless bounty hunter, Loco (Klaus Kinski), who is hired by a group of wealthy businessmen to kill a band of outlaws led by the charismatic and compassionate “Silence” (Jean-Louis Trintignant).

Silence is a mute gunslinger who only kills in self-defense, and who protects the poor and oppressed.

He becomes the target of Loco’s brutal and sadistic hunt, leading to a thrilling and bloody showdown between the two.

“The Great Silence” is notable for its bleak and unconventional ending, which subverts the traditional tropes of the genre.

The film also features stunning cinematography that captures the harsh beauty of the snowy landscape, as well as a haunting and memorable score by composer Ennio Morricone.

 

It is regarded by some as one of the best spaghetti westerns ever made.

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The Great Silence
  • Klaus Kinski, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Vonetta McGee (Actors)
  • Sergio Corbucci (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

The Grand Duel (Giancarlo Santi, 1972)

“The Grand Duel” is a classic spaghetti western directed by Giancarlo Santi and starring Lee Van Cleef.

The film follows Sheriff Clayton (Van Cleef) as he pursues a wanted man named Philip Wermeer (Alberto Dentice) who has been wrongly accused of murder.

As Clayton and Wermeer travel together, they are pursued by a gang of ruthless bounty hunters led by a corrupt businessman named David Barry (Horst Frank).

Along the way, Clayton and Wermeer become allies and form a bond, but they must fight against overwhelming odds in order to clear Wermeer’s name and bring justice to the corrupt town.

“The Grand Duel” is a thrilling and action-packed western with stunning cinematography and a memorable score by composer Luis Bacalov.

Van Cleef delivers a charismatic and stoic performance as the no-nonsense Sheriff Clayton, while Dentice provides a sympathetic portrayal of the wrongly accused Wermeer.

The film is also notable for its use of flashbacks, nonlinear storytelling, and a climactic showdown that is both tense and satisfying.

 

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The Grand Duel [Blu-ray]
  • Lee Van Cleef, Alberto Dentice, Jess Hahn (Actors)
  • Giancarlo Santi (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

Shoot The Living, Pray For The Dead (Giuseppe Vari, 1971)

Shoot The Living, Pray For The Dead is a spaghetti western film directed by Giuseppe Vari.

The film follows Dan Hogan (played by Klaus Kinski), a gunslinger who has retired from his violent ways and is living a peaceful life with his family.

However, his past comes back to haunt him when a group of bandits led by the ruthless Kraut (played by Luigi Pistilli) kidnaps his wife and kills his son.

Hogan sets out to get revenge and enlists the help of his former partner, a Native American named Magua (played by Victoria Zinny), and a group of outlaws.

As they track down Kraut and his men, they are faced with various obstacles and challenges, including Kraut’s cunning tactics and Magua’s loyalty being tested.

The film is a classic spaghetti western with all the elements that define the genre – shootouts, revenge, betrayal, and honor.

Klaus Kinski delivers a memorable performance as the tortured gunslinger seeking redemption, and the supporting cast is equally impressive.

The film’s score by Francesco De Masi also adds to the film’s overall atmosphere and mood.

While not as well-known as some of the more popular spaghetti westerns, Shoot The Living, Pray For The Dead is a solid entry in the genre and is worth watching for fans of westerns and Kinski’s work.

 

Shoot the Living and Pray for the Dead (Mörder des Klans - Western Unchained 10) [Blu-Ray Region B Import - Germany]
  • Klaus Kinski (Actor)
  • Giuseppe Vari (Director)
  • German (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

Tepepa (Giulio Petroni, 1968)

“Tepepa” is a Italian Western directed by Giulio Petroni, set in the backdrop of the Mexican Revolution.

The film tells the story of Tepepa, a revolutionary leader who is on the run from the Mexican army, led by Colonel Cascorro.

The plot unfolds as the two characters engage in a game of cat-and-mouse, with Tepepa fighting for the rights of his people, and Cascorro blindly following orders without questioning the morality of his actions.

The film is notable for its political commentary on the revolution, which was a time of great upheaval and change in Mexican society.

It presents a sympathetic view of the rebels, portraying them as freedom fighters, while the army is depicted as oppressive and corrupt.

The standout performance in the film is by Tomas Milian, who plays Tepepa with intensity and conviction, and effectively conveys the character’s moral dilemma and inner conflict.

Orson Welles also appears in a supporting role as a wealthy landowner who initially supports the revolution, but later betrays Tepepa.

The cinematography in “Tepepa” is also noteworthy, with beautiful landscape shots of the Mexican countryside and action sequences that are expertly staged and choreographed.

The film’s score, composed by Ennio Morricone, is also a highlight, adding to the film’s epic and dramatic tone.

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The Ugly Ones (Eugenio Martin, 1966)

“The Ugly Ones” (also known as “The Bounty Killer”) is a Spaghetti Western directed by Eugenio Martin.

Starring Tomas Milian and Richard Wyler, the film follows a bounty hunter named Luke Chilson as he escorts a notorious criminal named Gomez to be executed.

As they travel together, they encounter various obstacles and threats, including a group of outlaws seeking to free Gomez and a gang of ruthless bounty hunters vying for the reward money.

Along the way, Luke discovers that there may be more to Gomez’s story than he originally thought.

“The Ugly Ones” is a classic Spaghetti Western with all the hallmarks of the genre – gunfights, horseback chases, and gritty violence.

However, it also has a surprising amount of depth, exploring themes of loyalty, betrayal, and the blurred lines between right and wrong.

Milian gives a standout performance as Luke, bringing both toughness and vulnerability to the role.

Wyler is also impressive as the enigmatic Gomez, a man with a dark past and a mysterious agenda.

 

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The Man With No Name Trilogy [Blu-ray]
  • English, English, French (Subtitles)

Viva Django! (Ferdinando Baldi, 1967)

Viva Django! is a spaghetti Western directed by Ferdinando Baldi and released in.

The film stars Terence Hill as Django, a lone gunslinger who arrives in a small town ruled by a cruel and corrupt landowner named David Barry (played by Horst Frank).

Django takes up the cause of the oppressed townspeople, leading a rebellion against Barry and his gang of bandits.

The film’s plot revolves around Django’s quest for revenge against Barry, who killed his wife.

Django is initially reluctant to get involved in the town’s affairs, but is swayed by the pleas of the local innkeeper, who is being extorted by Barry.

Along the way, Django is aided by a group of Mexican revolutionaries, who help him to defeat Barry’s henchmen.

Viva Django! features many of the classic tropes of the spaghetti Western genre, including gunfights, horse chases, and a lone hero taking on a corrupt system.

The film’s score, composed by Roberto Pregadio, is also notable for its use of electric guitar and other unconventional instruments.

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Django Prepare a Coffin (2-Disc Special Edition) [Blu-ray + DVD]
  • Terence Hill, Horst Frank (Actors)
  • Ferdinando Baldi (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)

Machine Gun Killers (Paolo Bianchini, 1968)

Gatling Gun is an exciting and engaging Spaghetti Western directed by Paolo Bianchini.

The film follows the story of an inventor named Richard Gatling and his invention of a revolutionary machine gun.

The film follows the journey of the gun from Las Cruses, New Mexico to Washington D.C. for mass distribution in the Union army.

The story is heavily layered and features some exciting editing transitions, such as the match cuts and more.

In the waning days of the Civil War, Richard Gatling, creator of the gatling gun, offers his invention to the Federal Government.

But Gatling is kidnapped by two assassins – under the employ of Tarpas. They also steal his new invention and kill three Union government agents.

Soon after, the Pinkerton Agency sends out Cpt. Chris Tanner (himself a former secret service agent) to find Gatling and recover the weapon.

The cinematography is also impressive, with some great shots of the Old West.

The film also features some Italian language scenes with removable English subtitles, although some DVD copies may not have them.

Gatling Gun is a great Spaghetti Western that is sure to please fans of the genre. It features an exciting story, great acting, and impressive cinematography.

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Django Prepare a Coffin (2-Disc Special Edition) [Blu-ray + DVD]
  • Terence Hill, Horst Frank (Actors)
  • Ferdinando Baldi (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)

What Is The Difference Between A Western And A Spaghetti Western?

When you think of spaghetti westerns, what comes to mind? Clint Eastwood in a poncho with an itchy trigger finger?

A dusty town on the frontier full of cowboys and bandits? The iconic theme song from Ennio Morricone?

The term “spaghetti western” is used to describe a subgenre of the Western film.

The most famous example of this genre was Sergio Leone’s A Fistful Of Dollars, which helped launch Clint Eastwood into stardom. What exactly defines a spaghetti western?

While there isn’t an exact definition, it can be seen as a type of Italian-made film with typically low budgets and minimalist settings that focus on action rather than dialogue or plot development.

Spaghetti Westerns, or Italian Westerns as they are also known, were a genre of movies that came out in the 1960s and 1970s.

The films typically featured an Italian actor playing a lead role against a backdrop of American Old West scenery.

They would often have more explicit violence than their counterparts in Hollywood.

Westerns will usually feature cowboys from America’s Wild West era while Spaghetti Westerns will generally be set in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s with an emphasis on gunfights and outlaw behavior.

Although both genres follow similar storylines (such as good versus evil,) there are some small differences between them such as setting, tone, and style of filming which make each one unique.

The term “spaghetti western” is often used to describe a category of Italian-made Western films.

The fact that these movies are made in Italy could lead one to believe they are just an imitation of the genre, but there’s more to it than meets the eye.

Why Are Spaghetti Westerns Called Spaghetti Westerns?

Spaghetti Westerns are often called spaghetti westerns for a few reasons.

One reason is that they were made in Italy, and the word “spaghetti” was used to describe Italian-made westerns (as opposed to Mexican or American).

Another reason is that many of these movies were very low budget, so producers would skimp on things like food which would lead them to pasta dishes being served at the set.

Finally, there’s an idea of how some directors filmed scenes with long shots and close-ups which might make it seem as though spaghetti noodles are just out of focus in this type of shot.

The term “spaghetti western” was later popularized by Sergio Leone — the director who helped make Clint Eastwood into one of Hollywood’s most iconic stars — who coined it as a way to distinguish these more artful films from their Hollywood contemporaries.
 

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