Milos Forman was a Czech-American film director, screenwriter, and actor, who made a significant contribution to the world of cinema.

He is known for his diverse range of films, from period dramas to biopics, and from satirical comedies to music documentaries.

With his distinctive cinematic style, Forman was able to capture the essence of his characters and their stories in a way that was both poignant and entertaining.

His films often explored themes of social injustice, individual freedom, and the power of creativity and art.

Best Milos Forman Movies

In this article, we’ll look at some of the best Milos Forman films and what made them great.

1. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is a 1975 drama film directed by Milos Forman and based on the novel of the same name by Ken Kesey.

The film stars Jack Nicholson as Randle McMurphy, a free-spirited but troubled criminal who is sent to a mental institution after feigning insanity in hopes of serving out his sentence in a more comfortable environment.

Once there, he clashes with the strict and authoritarian Nurse Ratched, played by Louise Fletcher, who seeks to control the patients through a system of discipline and conformity.

The film explores themes of rebellion, individuality, and the dehumanizing effects of institutionalization.

It was critically acclaimed upon its release and won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director for Forman, Best Actor for Nicholson, Best Actress for Fletcher, and Best Adapted Screenplay for Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman.

It is widely regarded as a classic of American cinema and has had a lasting impact on popular culture, with its characters and themes being referenced in numerous films, TV shows, and other works of art.

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One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest [DVD]
  • One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest - DVD Used Like New
  • Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Michael Berryman (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Bo Goldman (Writer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

2. Amadeus (1984)

“Amadeus” (1984) is an epic biographical drama film directed by Milos Forman. The movie is based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, one of the greatest composers in history, and his relationship with his contemporary, Antonio Salieri.

The film stars Tom Hulce as Mozart and F. Murray Abraham as Salieri. It is notable for its opulent production design and beautiful score, which features many of Mozart’s most famous works.

“Amadeus” was a critical and commercial success, winning eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director for Forman, and Best Actor for Abraham.

The film’s themes of genius, envy, and the corrupting influence of power resonated with audiences, and it remains a beloved classic of the biographical genre.

One of the key reasons for the film’s success was Forman’s approach to the story, which used Mozart’s music as a way to tell his life story and capture his spirit.

The film’s visual style and pacing are both dramatic and engaging, and the performances by Hulce and Abraham are considered among their best.

Overall, “Amadeus” is a masterful film that showcases Forman’s ability to bring complex historical figures to life and his skill in using music as a narrative tool.

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Amadeus
  • F. Murray Abraham, Tom Hulce, Elizabeth Berridge (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Peter Shaffer (Writer)
  • English, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

3. The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996)

“The People vs. Larry Flynt” is a 1996 biographical drama film directed by Milos Forman and starring Woody Harrelson as Larry Flynt, the controversial founder and publisher of the pornographic magazine Hustler.

The film follows Flynt’s rise to fame and fortune as a pornographer, as well as his numerous legal battles and public controversies, including his landmark free speech case against televangelist Jerry Falwell.

The film explores themes of free speech, censorship, and the limits of artistic expression, as well as Flynt’s personal life and struggles, including his relationships with his wife, played by Courtney Love, and his lawyer, played by Edward Norton.

The film received critical acclaim upon its release and was nominated for two Academy Awards, including Best Actor for Harrelson and Best Director for Forman.

“The People vs. Larry Flynt” is a provocative and thought-provoking film that raises important questions about the role of the media, the power of the government to regulate speech, and the value of individual freedom and expression.

It is also a fascinating character study of Flynt himself, who is portrayed with empathy and nuance by Harrelson. Overall, the film is a testament to Forman’s skill as a director and his ability to tackle complex and controversial subjects with sensitivity and intelligence.

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The People Vs. Larry Flynt
  • Woody Harrelson, Courtney Love, Edward Norton (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Michael Hausman (Producer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

4. Hair (1979)

“Hair” is a 1979 musical film directed by Milos Forman, based on the popular Broadway musical of the same name.

The film is set in the late 1960s during the Vietnam War era and tells the story of a young farm boy from Oklahoma, Claude Hooper Bukowski, who goes to New York City and becomes part of a group of hippies protesting the war.

The film features an all-star cast that includes John Savage, Treat Williams, Beverly D’Angelo, and Annie Golden.

The music and lyrics of the original stage show were written by James Rado, Gerome Ragni, and Galt MacDermot, and they were adapted for the film by Michael Weller.

“Hair” was a critical and commercial success, with audiences and critics praising the film’s joyful celebration of youth culture and anti-war sentiment.

Forman’s direction was lauded for capturing the excitement and energy of the musical performances and the vibrant colors and costumes that represented the era.

Forman’s “Hair” was not only a musical, but also a politically-charged and socially-conscious film that reflected the era in which it was made.

It remains a beloved and influential film, not just for its depiction of a particular time in American history, but also for its timeless message of the importance of peace, love, and understanding.

Hair [DVD]
  • John Savage, Treat Williams, Beverly D'Angelo (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Gerome Ragni (Writer)
  • English, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

5. Man on the Moon (1999)

“Man on the Moon” is a 1999 biographical comedy-drama film directed by Milos Forman and starring Jim Carrey as the enigmatic and controversial comedian and performance artist, Andy Kaufman.

The film follows Kaufman’s life and career, from his early days as a struggling performer to his rise to fame as a mainstay on “Saturday Night Live” and his subsequent career in television and film.

The film explores themes of identity, performance, and the blurred lines between reality and fiction, as Kaufman was known for blurring the boundaries between his on-stage persona and his real-life self.

The film also stars Danny DeVito as Kaufman’s friend and collaborator, Bob Zmuda, and Courtney Love as his girlfriend, Lynne Margulies.

   

“Man on the Moon” received mixed reviews upon its release, with some critics praising Carrey’s performance and Forman’s direction, while others found the film to be overly reverential and lacking in depth.

However, the film has since gained a cult following and is widely regarded as one of the most interesting and unconventional biopics ever made.

Carrey’s portrayal of Kaufman is a highlight of the film, capturing the comedian’s unique blend of humor, eccentricity, and vulnerability. Overall, “Man on the Moon” is a fascinating and entertaining tribute to a one-of-a-kind performer and artist.

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Man on the Moon [DVD]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Jim Carrey, Danny DeVito, Courtney Love (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Scott Alexander (Writer) - Danny DeVito (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

6. Ragtime (1981)

“Ragtime” is a 1981 drama film directed by Milos Forman, based on the novel by E.L. Doctorow. The film is set in New York City in the early 1900s and features a large ensemble cast that includes James Cagney, Elizabeth McGovern, and Howard E. Rollins Jr.

The film explores themes of race, class, and social upheaval during a period of great change in American history. The story revolves around the intersecting lives of a wealthy white family, an African American musician, and a Jewish immigrant.

“Ragtime” was praised for its visual style and lush period detail, as well as the outstanding performances by the ensemble cast.

Forman’s direction effectively captures the complex interweaving of multiple storylines and the social tensions of the era, making it a powerful and engaging film.

While not a commercial success, “Ragtime” was well received by critics and was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Director for Forman.

The film has since become a cult classic and is regarded as one of Forman’s finest works.

Overall, “Ragtime” is a richly textured and thought-provoking film that showcases Forman’s skill as a storyteller and his ability to bring historical periods to life. It remains an important film that continues to resonate with audiences today.

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Ragtime
  • Ragtime - DVD Brand New
  • James Cagney, Elizabeth McGovern, Howard E. Rollins Jr. (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - E.L. Doctorow (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

7. Valmont (1989)

“Valmont” is a 1989 drama film directed by Milos Forman, based on the novel “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos.

The film stars Colin Firth as the scheming Vicomte de Valmont, who enters into a game of seduction and manipulation with the Marquise de Merteuil, played by Annette Bening, as they attempt to conquer various targets in their social circle.

The film explores themes of love, power, and betrayal, as well as the constraints of 18th century French society.

The costumes, sets, and cinematography create a lavish and detailed portrayal of the period, and the performances from the ensemble cast are strong, with Firth and Bening in particular delivering memorable and nuanced portrayals.

While “Valmont” was released around the same time as another adaptation of “Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” the critically acclaimed “Dangerous Liaisons,” Forman’s film stands out for its more understated approach and focus on character development.

While some may find the film slow-paced, it rewards patient viewers with a richly detailed and emotionally satisfying story of love and betrayal.

Overall, “Valmont” is a well-crafted and engaging period drama that showcases Forman’s skill as a director and the talents of its talented cast.

Valmont [DVD]
  • Colin Firth, Annette Bening, Meg Tilly (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Choderlos de Laclos (Writer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

8. Goya’s Ghosts (2006)

“Goya’s Ghosts” is a 2006 historical drama film directed by Milos Forman, starring Javier Bardem, Natalie Portman, and Stellan Skarsgård.

The film is set in 18th century Spain and explores the life and work of the famous Spanish painter Francisco Goya, as well as the brutal suppression of the Spanish Inquisition.

The story follows Goya, played by Skarsgård, who is commissioned by the Spanish Inquisition to paint a portrait of Inquisitor Lorenzo, played by Bardem.

However, Lorenzo becomes obsessed with Goya’s muse, a beautiful young woman named Inés, played by Portman, and has her arrested and tortured on suspicion of being a heretic.

The film was praised for its lush visuals and stunning cinematography, which effectively capture the beauty and brutality of 18th century Spain. The performances of the lead actors, particularly Bardem and Portman, were also widely lauded.

While “Goya’s Ghosts” was not a commercial success, it was generally well received by critics, who praised Forman’s direction and the film’s exploration of the themes of art, politics, and morality.

The film remains a powerful and engaging work that showcases Forman’s skill as a visual storyteller and his ability to bring historical periods to life.

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Goya's Ghosts
  • DVD
  • Multiple Formats, AC-3, Closed-captioned
  • English (Subtitled), Spanish (Subtitled), French (Subtitled)
  • 1
  • 114

9. A Blonde in Love (1965)

“A Blonde in Love” is a Czechoslovakian film directed by Miloš Forman, released in 1965. The film is also known as “Loves of a Blonde.”

The story follows Andula, a young woman from a small town who works in a factory. One night, she meets a pianist named Milda, who is in town with a group of musicians for a performance.

They spend the night together, and Andula falls in love with Milda. However, Milda leaves town the next day, and Andula decides to follow him to Prague.

In Prague, Andula finds Milda’s apartment, but he is not there. Instead, she meets his roommates, who are all musicians, and they invite her to stay with them. Andula tries to make a life in the big city, but she struggles to fit in and finds it difficult to connect with the people around her.

The film is a poignant exploration of love, loneliness, and the search for connection in a world that can be cold and indifferent. It is known for its naturalistic style, authentic performances, and subtle sense of humor.

“A Blonde in Love” was a critical and commercial success, and it helped establish Forman as one of the most important filmmakers of the Czech New Wave.

A Blonde in Love
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

10. The Firemen’s Ball (1967)

“The Firemen’s Ball” is a 1967 comedy film directed by Milos Forman. The film is set in a small Czechoslovakian town and follows the disastrous events that unfold during a local firemen’s ball, which is held as a benefit for the town’s fire department.

The story begins with the firemen preparing for the ball, which is meant to celebrate the retirement of the department’s longtime chief.

However, things quickly spiral out of control as the ball’s organizers struggle to keep up with the guests’ demands and the night’s events take increasingly chaotic turns.

Forman’s direction and the film’s use of non-professional actors give it a raw and naturalistic feel that perfectly captures the absurdity and chaos of the evening.

The film is also noted for its subtle commentary on life under communist rule in Czechoslovakia, which is conveyed through the bumbling and ineffectual behavior of the town’s officials.

“The Firemen’s Ball” was highly acclaimed upon its release and is widely regarded as a classic of Czechoslovakian cinema. It remains a testament to Forman’s skill as a director and his ability to capture the absurdities of everyday life in a way that is both humorous and poignant.

11. Taking Off (1971)

“Taking Off” is an American film directed by Miloš Forman, released in 1971. The film is a comedy-drama about the generation gap between parents and their teenage children.

The story follows a group of middle-class parents who attend a meeting at a New York City community center to discuss how to deal with their children’s recent disappearances.

The parents are worried that their children are involved in drugs or other dangerous activities. However, they quickly realize that they are out of touch with their children’s lives and don’t know how to communicate with them.

In an effort to better understand their children, the parents start attending support groups and participate in various activities that their children enjoy,

such as smoking marijuana and attending a rock concert. Along the way, they meet a group of hippies who offer them a glimpse into a different way of life.

“Taking Off” was Forman’s first American film, and it was well received by critics for its humorous and compassionate portrayal of the generation gap.

The film also features an early appearance by future Academy Award-winning actress Kathy Bates. While not a commercial success, “Taking Off” is considered a cult classic and an important film in the New Hollywood era of American cinema.

Taking Off (1971) [ Blu-Ray, Reg.A/B/C Import - France ]
  • Taking Off (1971)
  • Taking Off (1971)
  • Lynn Carlin, Buck Henry, Georgia Engel (Actors)
  • Milos Forman (Director) - Taking Off (1971) (Producer)
  • French (Subtitle)

12. Black Peter (1964)

“Black Peter” is a Czechoslovakian film directed by Miloš Forman, released in 1964. The film is a coming-of-age story that explores the life of a teenage boy in a small town.

   

The story follows Peter, a young man who starts a new job as a trainee in a supermarket. His job is to prevent shoplifting and catch thieves, but he is quickly overwhelmed and finds himself struggling to keep up with the demands of the job.

Peter also has to deal with the expectations of his parents, who want him to succeed in his new role, and his own growing sense of independence and rebellion.

The film is known for its realistic portrayal of life in a small Czech town and its subtle exploration of social and political themes..

It also features non-professional actors in many of the key roles, which adds to the film’s authenticity and naturalistic style.

“Black Peter” was a critical and commercial success in Czechoslovakia and helped establish Forman as one of the leading filmmakers of the Czech New Wave.

The film’s title is a reference to a traditional Christmas character in Czech folklore who accompanies St. Nicholas and carries a bundle of switches to punish naughty children.

The character’s black face is often seen as a controversial and racially charged element of Czech culture.

3 Characteristics of Milos Forman Films

Milos Forman was a renowned Czech-American filmmaker known for his contributions to the Czech New Wave and the American New Hollywood cinema. Here are three characteristics that are often found in his films:

Social commentary: Many of Forman’s films feature social commentary, with a focus on themes such as individualism, freedom, and rebellion.

His films often explore the tension between the individual and society, and the struggles of characters who are trying to assert their independence and individuality.

Humanism: Forman’s films are known for their humanistic approach to storytelling, which emphasizes the importance of empathy and compassion for all characters, regardless of their flaws or shortcomings.

His films often feature complex and nuanced characters who are struggling to find their place in the world, and his approach to storytelling emphasizes their humanity and vulnerability.

Realism: Forman’s films often feature a realistic, naturalistic style of filmmaking, with a focus on authentic performances and a documentary-like approach to storytelling.

He often worked with non-professional actors and used improvisation to capture the spontaneity and authenticity of human behavior. His films often explore the lives of ordinary people and the challenges they face in everyday life.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch Milos Forman Films

Sure, here are three reasons why you should watch Milos Forman films:

Innovative storytelling: Milos Forman was a master storyteller who broke the mold with his innovative approach to filmmaking.

He was known for his ability to blend different styles and genres, creating films that were both entertaining and thought-provoking.

His films often featured complex characters and challenging themes, which made them stand out in a crowded movie landscape.

Social commentary: Many of Forman’s films were set against the backdrop of significant historical events, including the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and the fall of communism.

Through his films, Forman explored a range of social and political issues, often offering a commentary on the human condition and the complexities of modern life.

His films were widely praised for their ability to convey complex ideas and emotions in a way that was both accessible and engaging.

Award-winning performances: Milos Forman was known for his ability to draw out powerful and nuanced performances from his actors.

Many of his films featured award-winning performances, including Jack Nicholson in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and F. Murray Abraham in “Amadeus”.

Forman’s ability to work with actors was a testament to his skill as a director and his commitment to bringing his vision to life on the screen.

Best Milos Forman Films – Wrapping Up

Milos Forman was a highly acclaimed filmmaker who directed many influential and award-winning films throughout his career. Here are some of his most notable and best films:

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975): This film, starring Jack Nicholson, won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and is considered a classic of American cinema.

It is a powerful and poignant exploration of the mental health system and the struggle for individual freedom and autonomy.

Amadeus (1984): This film, also a Best Picture winner, tells the story of the legendary composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart through the eyes of his rival, Antonio Salieri.

The film is known for its stunning visuals, powerful performances, and brilliant score.

The Fireman’s Ball (1967): This Czechoslovakian film is a satirical comedy that explores the corrupt and inept nature of bureaucracy in a small town. It is known for its naturalistic style, authentic performances, and dark humor.

Loves of a Blonde (1965): This romantic comedy-drama is a poignant exploration of love, loneliness, and the search for connection in a world that can be cold and indifferent. It helped establish Forman as one of the leading filmmakers of the Czech New Wave.

Hair (1979): This film is a musical adaptation of the hit Broadway show, and tells the story of a young man who joins a group of hippies during the Vietnam War era.

It is known for its energetic musical numbers, vibrant visuals, and its message of peace and love.

These are just a few of Milos Forman’s most notable and best films, but he has many other notable works in his filmography.

His films are known for their powerful storytelling, authentic performances, and their exploration of complex social and political themes.