Moroccan cinema has a rich and diverse history, with a wide range of genres and themes. From historical epics to contemporary dramas, Moroccan movies reflect the country’s unique cultural heritage and complex social landscape.

Here are some of the best Moroccan movies that have gained international recognition and critical acclaim:

“Ali Zaoua: Prince of the Streets” (2000): Directed by Nabil Ayouch, this film tells the story of a group of homeless children in Casablanca who embark on a dangerous journey to fulfill their friend’s dream of a proper burial.

The film won several awards at international film festivals and is widely regarded as a masterpiece of Moroccan cinema.

“The Yacoubian Building” (2006): Directed by Marwan Hamed, this film is based on the novel of the same name by Alaa Al Aswany. Set in a Cairo apartment building, the film explores the lives of its diverse inhabitants and their struggles with love, sexuality, and politics.

The film was a critical and commercial success and won several awards at international film festivals.

“Mimosas” (2016): Directed by Oliver Laxe, this film tells the story of a group of travelers who embark on a journey across the Atlas Mountains to bury a deceased sheikh. The film is a mystical and poetic exploration of faith, tradition, and the human spirit.

It won the Nespresso Grand Prize at the Cannes Film Festival and was praised for its breathtaking cinematography and powerful performances.

Best Moroccan Movies

These films are just a few examples of the many outstanding works of Moroccan cinema. From classic films to contemporary masterpieces, Moroccan movies offer a unique and compelling perspective on the country’s history, culture, and people.

1. Horses of God (2012)

“Horses of God” is a Moroccan-French drama film that was released in 2012. The film was directed by Nabil Ayouch and is based on the novel “The Stars of Sidi Moumen” by Mahi Binebine.

The story follows four young boys living in the Sidi Moumen slums of Casablanca, Morocco, who are drawn into radical Islamist groups and become suicide bombers.

The film explores themes of poverty, religion, and extremism, and has been praised for its gritty realism and powerful performances.

“Horses of God” has won numerous awards, including the François Chalais Prize at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival.

Horses of God (English Subtitled)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Abdelhakim Rachid, Abdelilah Rachid, Hamza Souidek (Actors)
  • Nabil Ayouch (Director) - Jamal Belmahi (Writer) - Nabil Ayouch (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

   

2. Casanegra (2008)

“Casanegra” is a Moroccan drama film directed by Nour-Eddine Lakhmari, released in 2008. The film tells the story of two childhood friends, Karim and Adil, who grew up in the poverty-stricken neighborhoods of Casablanca.

As adults, they become involved in the criminal underworld of the city, but their friendship is put to the test when they fall in love with the same woman.

The film explores themes of friendship, love, and social inequality in contemporary Morocco.

It received critical acclaim for its gritty and realistic portrayal of life in the slums of Casablanca and the struggles of the working class.

“Casanegra” won several awards, including the Tanit d’Or for Best Feature Film at the Carthage Film Festival and the Golden Palm at the Valencia International Film Festival. The film is now regarded as a landmark in Moroccan cinema.

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  • English (Publication Language)
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3. Death for Sale (2011)

Death for Sale is a 2011 Moroccan crime drama film directed by Faouzi Bensaïdi. The film follows three young men in the city of Tetouan who decide to rob a jewelry store.

Their plan quickly spirals out of control and they find themselves caught up in a dangerous criminal underworld.

As the trio navigates the criminal underworld, they become involved with a variety of characters, including a corrupt police officer and a prostitute. The film explores themes of friendship, betrayal, and the allure of crime.

The film also provides a glimpse into contemporary Moroccan society, including issues of poverty, social inequality, and corruption.

The characters in the film are complex and multi-dimensional, reflecting the complexities of life in modern-day Morocco.

Death for Sale was well-received by critics and was screened at several film festivals, including the Toronto International Film Festival and the Cannes Film Festival.

The film is considered a compelling and thought-provoking exploration of crime and society in contemporary Morocco.

   

Faces of Death Collection (Vols. 1-4)
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Samuel Berkowitz, Michael Carr, Mary Ellen Brighton (Actors)
  • Andrew Theopolis (Director) - James B. Schwartz (Writer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

4. Zero (I) (2012)

“Zero” is an Indian romantic drama film directed by Aanand L. Rai. The film stars Shah Rukh Khan, Anushka Sharma, and Katrina Kaif in lead roles.

The film tells the story of a young man named Bauua Singh, played by Shah Rukh Khan, who is vertically challenged and lives in Meerut, a small town in Uttar Pradesh, India.

Despite his physical limitations, Bauua dreams of living a full and fulfilling life, and is determined to find love and happiness.

One day, Bauua meets a beautiful and ambitious scientist named Aafia, played by Anushka Sharma, and the two begin a tumultuous romantic relationship.

However, their love is complicated by a famous movie star named Babita, played by Katrina Kaif, who also becomes enamored with Bauua.

As the three characters navigate their feelings for each other, the film explores themes of love, ambition, and the pursuit of happiness. It also features elaborate song and dance sequences, which are a hallmark of Indian cinema.

“Zero” was released in 2018 and received mixed reviews from critics. While the film was praised for its performances and production values, it was criticized for its uneven tone and overly long runtime.

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  • English (Publication Language)

   

5. Ali Zaoua: Prince of the Streets (2000)

“Ali Zaoua: Prince of the Streets” is a 2000 Moroccan-French drama film directed by Nabil Ayouch.

The film tells the story of four young boys who live on the streets of Casablanca and dream of a better life. After one of them, Ali Zaoua, is killed, the remaining boys plan to give him a proper burial in order to honor his memory.

The film was praised for its honest portrayal of street children and their struggles, and it was notable for its use of non-professional child actors. The film also received critical acclaim for its cinematography and music.

“Ali Zaoua: Prince of the Streets” won several awards, including the François Chalais Award at the Cannes Film Festival and the Best Picture award at the Stockholm Film Festival.

The film was Morocco’s submission for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2000, but it was not nominated.

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Ali Zaoua
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Saïd Taghmaoui, Mounim Kbab, Mustapha Hansali (Actors)
  • Nabil Ayouch (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

6. Marock (2005)

“Marock” is a 2005 Moroccan drama film directed by Laïla Marrakchi. The film tells the story of Rita (Morjana Alaoui), a teenage girl from a wealthy family in Casablanca, who falls in love with Youri (Matthieu Boujenah), a Jewish boy from the city’s poorer district.

The film explores themes of identity, class, and religion, as well as the challenges and complexities of young love in a conservative society.

“Marock” was a controversial film in Morocco due to its frank portrayal of sex, drugs, and social issues.

Despite the controversy, the film was a critical and commercial success, both in Morocco and abroad. It won several awards at international film festivals and was praised for its stylish and visually stunning depiction of contemporary Casablanca.

The film’s director, Laïla Marrakchi, has been hailed as one of the most talented and influential female filmmakers in Morocco.

“Marock” is a powerful and thought-provoking film that offers a unique and honest perspective on the challenges and complexities of young love and social issues in contemporary Morocco.

If you are interested in exploring Moroccan cinema, “Marock” is definitely a must-watch.

7. Road to Kabul (2011)

“Road to Kabul” is a French-Belgian drama film that was released in 2012.

The film was directed by Brahim Chkiri and is based on the true story of a Moroccan family’s search for their son who went missing after traveling to Afghanistan.

The story follows the family’s journey as they travel from Morocco to Afghanistan, encountering various dangers and obstacles along the way.

The film explores themes of family, identity, and the consequences of extremism.

“Road to Kabul” has been praised for its strong performances and gripping storytelling, and was the Moroccan entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 85th Academy Awards.

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  • English (Publication Language)
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8. The Source (2011)

“The Source” is a French-Tunisian drama film directed by Radu Mihaileanu, released in 2011.

The film tells the story of a group of women in a remote village in North Africa who are tasked with traveling long distances to fetch water for their families.

When the women learn of a proposal to build a pipeline to their village, they begin to question the traditional gender roles that have kept them from receiving an education and working outside the home.

The film explores themes of gender, tradition, and social change in rural North Africa. It received critical acclaim for its beautiful cinematography and poignant portrayal of women’s struggles for equality and empowerment.

“The Source” was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and won several awards, including the Grand Prix des Amériques at the Montreal World Film Festival.

9. Atlantic. (2014)

Atlantic is a 2014 Irish documentary film directed by Risteard O’Domhnaill. The film explores the impact of globalization and industrial fishing on the fishing communities along the Atlantic coast of Ireland, Norway, and Newfoundland.

The documentary highlights the challenges faced by these communities as they struggle to maintain their traditional way of life in the face of changing economic and environmental conditions.

It also provides insight into the impact of industrial fishing practices on marine ecosystems and the devastating effects of overfishing.

The film features stunning cinematography of the Atlantic coast and interviews with fishermen, scientists, and activists who are working to protect the oceans and the livelihoods of those who depend on them.

Atlantic was well-received by critics and won several awards, including Best Irish Documentary at the Dublin International Film Festival.

The film is considered an important and timely exploration of the complex issues surrounding industrial fishing and the global impact of human activity on the world’s oceans.

The Atlantic 2014 January/february - Surviving Anxiety By Scott Stossel
  • The Atlantic 2012 (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 06/13/2024 (Publication Date) - The Atlantic 2012 (Publisher)

10. Traitors (2013)

“Traitors” is a British television drama series, but it was released in 2019, not 2013. The series is set in 1945 and follows a young woman named Feef Symonds, who is recruited by the British government to spy on her own family and friends in order to uncover a Soviet plot.

As Feef becomes increasingly enmeshed in the world of espionage, she begins to question her loyalties and the morality of her actions.

The series explores themes of betrayal, loyalty, and political intrigue, and features strong performances from its cast, which includes Emma Appleton, Michael Stuhlbarg, and Keeley Hawes.

“Traitors” received positive reviews from critics, who praised its gripping storyline, strong performances, and evocative period setting.

However, the series was not renewed for a second season, and its creators have indicated that the story was always intended to be a standalone miniseries.

Traitors
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Chaimae Ben Acha, Soufia Issami (Actors)
  • Sean Gullette (Director) - Sean Gullette (Writer) - Sean Gullette (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)

11. Much Loved (2015)

“Much Loved” is a 2015 Moroccan-French drama film directed by Nabil Ayouch. The film follows the lives of four female sex workers in Marrakech, Morocco, and explores themes of friendship, love, and survival in the face of social stigma and economic hardship.

The film was notable for its frank depiction of the sex industry in Morocco and was highly controversial upon its release. The film was banned in Morocco and several other Arab countries, and the director and actresses received death threats.

Despite the controversy, “Much Loved” was praised for its strong performances and its unflinching portrayal of the lives of marginalized women.

The film was selected to compete in the Directors’ Fortnight section at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

“Much Loved” was not submitted for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, as Morocco did not select a film for the category that year.

Much loved
  • Ayouch Nabil (Author)
  • French (Subtitle)
  • French (Publication Language)

3 Characteristics of Moroccan Movies

Cultural Diversity: Moroccan movies often reflect the country’s rich cultural heritage and diversity, drawing on influences from Berber, Arab, and French cultures.

This is reflected in the wide range of languages spoken in Moroccan movies, including Moroccan Arabic, Berber, and French. Moroccan cinema explores the complex social and political landscape of the country, including issues related to identity, religion, gender, and class.

Bold and Experimental Filmmaking: Moroccan cinema has a reputation for bold and experimental filmmaking, often pushing the boundaries of conventional storytelling and film aesthetics.

Many Moroccan filmmakers explore unconventional narrative structures and employ innovative visual techniques, making their films unique and captivating.

Strong Social and Political Themes: Moroccan movies often address social and political issues relevant to Moroccan society, including poverty, inequality, and discrimination.

They offer a critical and often uncompromising look at the challenges facing the country and its people, highlighting the need for change and social justice. At the same time, Moroccan cinema celebrates the country’s rich cultural heritage and traditions, and its unique place in the world.

3 Reasons To Watch Moroccan Movies

Unique Cultural Perspective: Moroccan movies offer a unique cultural perspective that is not often represented in Western cinema.

They showcase the country’s diverse cultural heritage and its contemporary social and political issues. From the bustling streets of Casablanca to the rural communities in the Atlas Mountains, Moroccan movies provide a window into the country’s rich and complex culture.

Compelling Storytelling: Moroccan movies are known for their compelling storytelling, which draws on a rich tradition of oral storytelling and folklore.

Many Moroccan movies use allegory and metaphor to explore complex themes such as identity, tradition, and modernity. They also often feature strong characters and powerful performances, which help to bring their stories to life.

Recognition at International Film Festivals: Moroccan movies have been gaining recognition at international film festivals, such as the Cannes Film Festival and the Academy Awards.

This recognition has helped to raise awareness of Moroccan cinema and its unique cultural perspective. By watching Moroccan movies, you can support the country’s filmmakers and contribute to the growing global appreciation of Moroccan cinema.

Best Moroccan Movies – Wrap Up

Moroccan cinema has a rich history, with many talented filmmakers producing powerful and thought-provoking films that explore themes of identity, culture, and social change. Some of the best Moroccan movies include:

“Casanegra” (2008) – A gritty and realistic portrayal of life in the slums of Casablanca and the struggles of the working class.

“Ali Zaoua: Prince of the Streets” (2000) – A moving and poignant film about the lives of street children in Casablanca and their dreams of a better future.

“Transes” (1981) – A groundbreaking documentary about the vibrant music scene in Morocco in the 1970s and the influence of traditional Gnawa music.

“A Thousand Months” (2003) – A beautifully filmed drama about a young boy growing up in a remote village in Morocco during the month of Ramadan.

“Rock the Casbah” (2013) – A dark comedy about a wealthy family in Casablanca who must confront their inner demons when their patriarch dies.

These films, among many others, have contributed to the development of Moroccan cinema and have been recognized internationally for their artistic merit and social commentary.