African cinema has a rich and diverse history, with filmmakers from across the continent producing groundbreaking and critically acclaimed movies.

From the early days of post-colonial African cinema to the present day, African filmmakers have explored a wide range of themes, from cultural identity and social issues to historical events and personal struggles.

Some of the most celebrated African movies have won international recognition and critical acclaim, including numerous awards at major film festivals such as Cannes, Venice, and Toronto.

These films offer a unique perspective on the culture and history of the continent, as well as the challenges and triumphs of its people.

Best African Movies

In this article, we will highlight some of the best African movies that have made a significant impact on the world of cinema. From iconic classics to recent releases, these films showcase the diverse range of voices and stories that make up African cinema.

1. Yaaba (1989)

“Yaaba” is a Burkinabé drama film directed by Idrissa Ouedraogo and released in 1989. The film is set in a rural village in Burkina Faso and tells the story of two young children who befriend an old woman who is ostracized by the rest of the community.

The film explores themes of ageism, prejudice, and the power of friendship. The two young protagonists, Bila and Nopoko, are initially afraid of the old woman, known as “Yaaba” (which means “grandmother” in the local language), due to the rumors and superstitions surrounding her.

However, they gradually come to see her as a kind and gentle soul, and they form a bond with her that defies the prejudices and fears of the rest of the community.

The film is notable for its striking cinematography, which captures the natural beauty of the Burkinabé landscape and the vibrant colors and textures of village life.

The film was well-received by critics and audiences alike, and it won several awards, including the FIPRESCI Prize at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival.

“Yaaba” is a poignant and powerful film that offers a moving portrait of the human spirit and its capacity for compassion and connection, even in the face of adversity and prejudice.

It is a must-watch for anyone interested in African cinema or stories of resilience and friendship in the face of adversity.

Yaaba [ NON-USA FORMAT, PAL, Reg.0 Import - France ]
  • Yaaba
  • Yaaba
  • Fatimata Sanga, Noufou Ouédraogo, Roukietou Barry (Actors)
  • Idrissa Ouedraogo (Director) - Yaaba (Producer)
  • Spanish, French, English (Subtitles)

2. Yeelen (1987)

Yeelen is a 1987 Malian drama film directed by Souleymane Cissé. The film tells the story of Nianankoro, a young man with magical powers who embarks on a journey to find his father and defeat his evil sorcerer uncle.

Nianankoro’s journey takes him through the harsh desert landscape of Mali, where he faces many challenges and obstacles.

The film deals with themes of family, tradition, and the clash between modernity and ancient African culture. It explores the mystical beliefs and practices of the Bambara people of Mali and showcases the richness and diversity of African culture.

Yeelen was critically acclaimed and won several awards, including the Jury Prize at the 1987 Cannes Film Festival.

It is considered a masterpiece of African cinema and one of the greatest films ever made from the continent. The film’s striking visuals, powerful storytelling, and exploration of African spirituality have made it a classic of world cinema.

Yeelen
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Issiaka Kane, Aoua Sangare, Niamanto Sanogo (Actors)
  • Souleymane Ciss (Director) - Souleymane Ciss (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

3. The Season of Men (2000)

“The Season of Men” (French: “La Saison des hommes”) is a Tunisian-French drama film directed by Moufida Tlatli and released in 2000. The movie is set in a small village in Tunisia, and follows the lives of a group of women who are left alone when their husbands go to work in the city.

The film explores themes such as tradition, gender roles, and the changing social landscape of Tunisia in the late 20th century. The story is told from the perspective of Saloua, a young woman who is married to a man who is often away working in the city.

Saloua and her friends must navigate the challenges of daily life in a patriarchal society, where women are expected to be subservient to men and where their own desires and ambitions are often suppressed.

“The Season of Men” was praised for its powerful performances, its sensitive portrayal of women’s lives, and its exploration of the tensions between tradition and modernity in contemporary Tunisia.

The film was also noteworthy for its use of traditional Tunisian music and imagery, which added to its sense of authenticity and cultural specificity. “The Season of Men” was a critical success and won numerous awards, both in Tunisia and internationally.

X-Men
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Dougray Scott (Actors)
  • Bryan Singer (Director) - David Hayter (Writer) - Richard Donner (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

4. The Battle of Algiers (1966)

“The Battle of Algiers” is an Italian-Algerian historical war film directed by Gillo Pontecorvo. The movie was released in 1966 and is based on the events of the Algerian War (1954-1962), which was a conflict between the Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN) and French forces.

The film depicts the tactics used by the FLN to conduct a guerrilla war against the French colonial forces, and the brutal tactics used by the French to suppress the insurgency.

The film is shot in a documentary-style, with a focus on the actions of individual characters on both sides of the conflict.

“The Battle of Algiers” was a critical success and is widely regarded as a masterpiece of political cinema. The film was controversial upon its release and was banned in France for several years due to its depiction of French military brutality.

However, the film was also praised for its realism and its portrayal of the complex political and social issues surrounding the Algerian War. The film has been cited as an influence by numerous filmmakers, including Steven Spielberg and Paul Greengrass.

The Battle of Algiers (The Criterion Collection)
  • Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi (Actors)
  • Gillo Pontecorvo (Director) - Franco Solinas (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

5. Waiting for Happiness (2002)

“Waiting for Happiness” (original title: “Heremakono”) is a 2002 Mauritanian movie directed by Abderrahmane Sissako.

The film follows the journey of a young man named Abdallah, who returns to his hometown in Mauritania after living in Europe for many years. As he reconnects with his family and friends, Abdallah discovers the struggles and complexities of life in his small desert village.

The movie is a poignant and poetic exploration of cultural identity, displacement, and the clash between tradition and modernity.

Through its stunning cinematography and minimalist storytelling, “Waiting for Happiness” offers a deeply personal and introspective look at the challenges faced by people living on the fringes of society.

“Waiting for Happiness” was a critical success and won numerous awards at international film festivals, including the FIPRESCI Prize at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.

The movie is widely regarded as a masterpiece of African cinema and a testament to the talent of its director, Abderrahmane Sissako.

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6. District 9 (2009)

“District 9” is a science fiction action film directed by Neill Blomkamp and released in 2009. The film is set in Johannesburg, South Africa, and tells the story of an extraterrestrial race that is forced to live in a government-controlled slum known as District 9.

The film explores themes of xenophobia, discrimination, and government corruption, as well as the consequences of first contact with an alien species.

The protagonist of the film is a government agent named Wikus van de Merwe, who is tasked with relocating the aliens from District 9 to a new internment camp.

However, when Wikus is accidentally exposed to a mysterious alien substance, he begins to experience strange and frightening changes that threaten his very existence.

“District 9” is notable for its groundbreaking visual effects, which seamlessly blend live-action footage with computer-generated imagery to create a realistic and immersive world.

The film also features strong performances from its cast, particularly Sharlto Copley as Wikus van de Merwe.

The film was a critical and commercial success upon its release, earning numerous accolades and nominations, including four Academy Award nominations.

It has since become a cult classic and is widely regarded as one of the most innovative and thought-provoking science fiction films of the 21st century. “District 9” is a must-watch for fans of science fiction, action, and thought-provoking cinema.

District 9
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Sharlto Copley, Jason Cope, David James (Actors)
  • Neill Blomkamp (Director) - Neill Blomkamp (Writer) - Peter Jackson (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

7. Atlantique (2019)

Atlantique is a 2019 Senegalese-French drama film directed by Mati Diop. The film tells the story of Ada (Mama Sané), a young woman who falls in love with Souleiman (Ibrahima Traoré), a construction worker who is owed months of unpaid wages.

After Souleiman and his fellow workers leave for Spain by boat in search of a better life, Ada is betrothed to Omar (Babacar Sylla), a wealthy man chosen by her parents.

As Ada prepares for her wedding, strange occurrences begin to happen in her community. Young women are possessed by a mysterious force, and Souleiman’s friends return as vengeful spirits seeking justice for their mistreatment.

The film deals with themes of migration, inequality, and social injustice, as well as the supernatural and the spiritual. It is a powerful exploration of the lives of young people in modern-day Dakar and the struggles they face as they navigate a changing world.

Atlantique was critically acclaimed and won the Grand Prix at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. It is considered one of the most important African films of the 21st century and has brought international attention to the vibrant and diverse cinema of Senegal.

Atlantique [Blu-Ray]
  • Diop Mati (Author)
  • French (Subtitle)

8. I Am Not a Witch (2017)

“I Am Not a Witch” is a British-Zambian drama film written and directed by Rungano Nyoni and released in 2017. The movie tells the story of a young Zambian girl named Shula, who is accused of witchcraft and sent to a witch camp in the middle of the desert.

The film explores themes such as superstition, gender roles, and the exploitation of women and children in African societies.

Shula is forced to navigate a world where she is both feared and revered for her supposed magical powers, and where the only way to escape her situation is to deny her own identity and conform to the expectations of those around her.

“I Am Not a Witch” was praised for its powerful performances, its stark cinematography, and its unflinching portrayal of the harsh realities of life in contemporary Africa.

The film was also notable for its use of satire and dark humor to explore serious political and social issues.

“I Am Not a Witch” was a critical success, winning numerous awards at international film festivals and establishing Rungano Nyoni as a major new voice in African cinema.

I Am Not a Witch
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Maggie Mulubwa, Nellie Munamonga, Dyna Mufuni (Actors)
  • Rungano Nyoni (Director) - Rungano Nyoni (Writer) - Mary Burke (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

9. Cairo Station (1958)

“Cairo Station,” also known as “The Iron Gate,” is an Egyptian drama film directed by Youssef Chahine.

The movie was released in 1958 and is set in Cairo’s central train station. The film tells the story of Qinawi, a crippled newspaper vendor who becomes infatuated with Hanuma, a young soda seller.

As Qinawi’s obsession with Hanuma grows, he becomes increasingly unstable and dangerous, leading to a tragic conclusion. The film is a commentary on the social and economic inequalities in Egyptian society and the plight of the working class.

“Cairo Station” was a critical and commercial success in Egypt and was widely acclaimed internationally. The film was praised for its innovative cinematography and its powerful commentary on social issues.

The film has since been regarded as a classic of Egyptian cinema and a landmark of Arab cinema. It has also been cited as an influence by numerous filmmakers, including Martin Scorsese and Abbas Kiarostami.

Cairo Station
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Farid Shawki, Hend Rostom, Youssef Chahine (Actors)
  • Youssef Chahine (Director) - Abdel Hey Adib (Writer) - Gabriel Talhami (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

10. La Noire de … (1966)

“La Noire de…” (English title: “Black Girl”) is a 1966 Senegalese movie directed by Ousmane Sembène. The film tells the story of a young Senegalese woman named Diouana, who travels to France to work as a nanny for a wealthy French family.

As she struggles to adapt to her new life and the harsh realities of racism and exploitation, Diouana’s hopes and dreams are shattered.

The movie is a powerful and uncompromising portrayal of the effects of colonialism and neocolonialism on African societies.

Through its raw and emotional storytelling, “La Noire de…” offers a scathing critique of the way in which African workers are treated in Europe, and the impact that this has on their sense of identity and self-worth.

“La Noire de…” was a groundbreaking film in African cinema and marked the emergence of Ousmane Sembène as a major voice in world cinema.

The movie won numerous awards at international film festivals and is widely regarded as a masterpiece of African cinema.

It continues to be studied and celebrated for its bold and unflinching depiction of the struggles faced by African women in a world that often seeks to silence their voices.

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11. Touki Bouki (1973)

“Touki Bouki” is a Senegalese film directed by Djibril Diop Mambéty and released in 1973. The film tells the story of a young couple, Mory and Anta, who dream of leaving Dakar, the capital city of Senegal, for a better life in France.

The film is a poetic and surrealistic exploration of post-colonial identity and the struggles of African youth in the wake of independence.

Mory and Anta are presented as emblematic of a generation caught between tradition and modernity, struggling to find their place in a rapidly changing world.

The film is also notable for its innovative cinematography, which blends documentary-style footage with dreamlike sequences and surreal imagery.

The film’s use of vibrant colors and striking visuals has been compared to the work of the French New Wave, and it is widely regarded as a masterpiece of African cinema.

“Touki Bouki” has had a lasting impact on African cinema and is considered a seminal work of the Senegalese film industry.

It was recently restored and re-released in high-definition, allowing a new generation of audiences to experience its powerful storytelling and stunning visuals. It is a must-watch for anyone interested in African cinema or avant-garde filmmaking.

TOUKI BOUKI
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

12. Abouna (2002)

Abouna is a 2002 Chadian drama film directed by Mahamat Saleh Haroun.

The film tells the story of two young brothers, Tahir (Ahidjo Mahamat Moussa) and Amine (Hamza Moctar Aguid), who live in N’Djamena, the capital city of Chad, with their father, who is a teacher at a local school.

One day, their father leaves without explanation, and the boys are left to fend for themselves.

The film follows the boys as they search for their father and try to come to terms with his absence. Along the way, they encounter a variety of characters and situations that challenge their understanding of the world around them.

Abouna deals with themes of family, loss, and identity, as well as the challenges faced by young people in African societies. The film is notable for its quiet, understated style and its emphasis on the emotional lives of its young protagonists.

Abouna was critically acclaimed and won several awards, including the Special Jury Prize at the 2002 Venice Film Festival. It is considered one of the most important films in Chadian cinema history and a significant contribution to African cinema as a whole.

Abouna
  • Ahidjo Mahamat Moussa, Hamza Moctar Aguid, Zara Haroun (Actors)
  • Mahamat-Saleh Haroun (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

13. Borders (2017)

“Borders” (Swedish: “Gräns”) is a Swedish fantasy drama film directed by Ali Abbasi and released in 2017.

The movie tells the story of Tina, a customs officer with a unique ability to smell fear and guilt. Tina’s life is changed forever when she encounters Vore, a mysterious man who shares her ability and seems to understand her in ways that no one else ever has.

The film explores themes such as identity, otherness, and the boundaries between human and animal.

Tina’s encounter with Vore forces her to confront the dark secrets of her past and to question her own place in the world.

“Borders” was praised for its imaginative storytelling, its stunning visuals, and its powerful performances, particularly by Eva Melander as Tina.

The film was also noteworthy for its blending of fantasy and social realism, and for its exploration of themes that are both deeply personal and universally relevant.

“Borders” was a critical and commercial success, winning numerous awards at international film festivals and earning widespread acclaim for its bold and original approach to storytelling.

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Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe
  • Kassabova, Kapka (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 400 Pages - 09/05/2017 (Publication Date) - Graywolf Press (Publisher)

14. The Nightingale’s Prayer (1959)

“The Nightingale’s Prayer” is an Egyptian drama film directed by Henry Barakat and released in 1959.

The movie is based on the novel “The Song of the Lark” by Willa Cather and tells the story of Amna, a young woman from a poor family in rural Egypt who seeks revenge after her sister is raped and impregnated by the son of a wealthy landowner.

The film follows Amna’s journey as she travels to Cairo to seek justice for her sister and encounters numerous challenges along the way. The film explores themes of social inequality, gender roles, and the struggle for justice in a patriarchal society.

“The Nightingale’s Prayer” was a critical and commercial success in Egypt and became one of the most iconic and influential films in Egyptian cinema. The film was praised for its strong performances, innovative cinematography, and powerful social commentary.

It has since been regarded as a classic of Arab cinema and has been cited as an influence by numerous filmmakers in the Arab world and beyond.

The Nightingale's Prayer [DVD]
  • Mazhar, Ahmed, Hamama, Faten (Actors)
  • Barakat, Henri (Director)
  • English, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

16. Letter from My Village (1976)

“Letter from My Village” (in French, “Lettre paysanne”) is a documentary film directed by Jean Rouch and released in 1976. The film tells the story of a young woman named Damoure Zika, who returns to her village in Niger after living in the city for several years.

The film is a poignant and intimate portrait of life in rural Niger, exploring the challenges and joys of everyday life for the villagers.

Through Damoure’s eyes, the film offers a glimpse into the traditions, customs, and beliefs of the villagers, as well as their struggles with poverty, drought, and other hardships.

The film is notable for its innovative approach to documentary filmmaking, which combines elements of ethnography, poetry, and personal narrative to create a unique and compelling portrait of a community.

The film’s use of voiceover narration and dreamlike imagery creates a sense of intimacy and immediacy, drawing viewers into the world of the villagers and allowing them to experience it firsthand.

“Letter from My Village” is a powerful and thought-provoking film that offers a window into a world that is often overlooked in mainstream media. It is a must-watch for anyone interested in documentary filmmaking, African culture, or the complexities of rural life.

17. The Wedding Party (2016)

The Wedding Party is a 2016 Nigerian romantic comedy film directed by Kemi Adetiba. The film follows the wedding preparations of Dunni Coker (Adesua Etomi) and Dozie Onwuka (Banky Wellington), a young couple from different social classes in Lagos, Nigeria.

As the wedding day approaches, their families and friends must navigate a series of hilarious and unexpected challenges, including cultural clashes, family secrets, and romantic entanglements.

The film deals with themes of love, family, tradition, and social class, and showcases the vibrancy and diversity of Nigerian culture. It features a star-studded cast of some of Nigeria’s most popular actors, including Sola Sobowale, Richard Mofe-Damijo, and Alibaba Akporobome.

The Wedding Party was a critical and commercial success, becoming the highest-grossing Nigerian film of all time upon its release.

It has since spawned two sequels, The Wedding Party 2: Destination Dubai and The Wedding Party: Zara’s Nikah, as well as a spin-off series, The Wedding Party: Love on the Run.

The film is credited with contributing to the growing popularity of Nollywood, Nigeria’s film industry, and the increasing recognition of African cinema on the global stage.

The Wedding Party
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Ali Baba Akporobome, Zainab Balogun, Lepacious Bose (Actors)
  • Kemi Adetiba (Director) - Tosin Otudeko (Writer) - Mo Abudu (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

18. Skoonheid (Beauty) (2011)

“Skoonheid” (English: “Beauty”) is a South African drama film directed by Oliver Hermanus and released in 2011. The movie tells the story of François, a middle-aged white Afrikaner who becomes obsessed with his daughter’s friend, Christian, a handsome and carefree young man.

The film explores themes such as sexual repression, racial and social identity, and the legacy of apartheid in South Africa.

François’s infatuation with Christian leads him on a dangerous and ultimately tragic path, as he struggles to come to terms with his own desires and the societal norms that restrict them.

“Skoonheid” was praised for its powerful performances, its nuanced exploration of complex themes, and its unflinching portrayal of the darker aspects of South African society.

The film was also noteworthy for its use of a fragmented narrative structure, which added to its sense of disorientation and unease.

“Skoonheid” was a critical success, winning numerous awards at international film festivals and establishing Oliver Hermanus as one of the most important new voices in South African cinema.

Beauty (2011) ( Skoonheid ) ( Omorfia ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, PAL, Reg.0 Import - United Kingdom ]
  • Beauty (2011) ( Skoonheid ) ( Omorfia )
  • Beauty (2011)
  • Skoonheid
  • Omorfia
  • Deon Lotz, Charlie Keegan, Michelle Scott (Actors)

19. Chronicle of the Years of Fire (1975)

“Chronicle of the Years of Fire” (original title: “Chronique des Années de Braise”) is a 1975 Algerian movie directed by Mohammed Lakhdar-Hamina.

The film is a powerful and moving depiction of the Algerian War of Independence, which took place from 1954 to 1962, and the struggle of the Algerian people against French colonial rule.

The movie follows the journey of an Algerian peasant named Ahmed, who becomes involved in the fight for independence and joins the National Liberation Front (FLN).

As the war intensifies and the violence escalates, Ahmed and his fellow fighters are forced to confront the harsh realities of the conflict and the sacrifices that must be made for their country’s freedom.

“Chronicle of the Years of Fire” is a masterpiece of African cinema and a landmark achievement in the history of Algerian cinema. The film won the Palme d’Or at the 1975 Cannes Film Festival, making it the first African movie to receive this prestigious award.

It continues to be celebrated for its bold and unflinching portrayal of the Algerian struggle for independence and its impact on the people who lived through it.

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Chronicle (Two-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo +Digital Copy)
  • Chronicle (Director's Cut: The Lost Footage Edition) - Blu-ray Used Very Good
  • Michael B. Jordan, Michael Kelly, Dane DeHaan (Actors)
  • Josh Trank (Director)
  • Spanish, French, English (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

3 Characteristics of African Movies

African movies, also known as Nollywood movies, are known for their unique characteristics that set them apart from other film industries. Here are three key characteristics of African movies:

Storytelling: African movies are known for their emphasis on storytelling. The narratives often revolve around social, cultural, and political issues, and explore themes such as family, love, and community.

African movies use vivid and relatable stories to convey important messages and promote cultural values.

Cultural Representation: African movies often focus on depicting the cultural and social realities of Africa.

The movies showcase the rich cultural heritage of the continent, including traditional costumes, music, language, and customs. They also address contemporary social and political issues, providing insight into the experiences of African people and communities.

Low-budget production: African movies are often produced with limited resources and budgets. Despite this, African filmmakers have developed innovative approaches to filmmaking, using low-budget techniques to create high-quality productions.

This has given rise to a unique style of filmmaking that emphasizes creativity, resourcefulness, and authenticity.

Overall, African movies are known for their emphasis on storytelling, cultural representation, and low-budget production. These characteristics have contributed to the growth and popularity of African cinema, making it a vibrant and important part of the global film industry.

3 Reasons To Watch African Movies

There are many compelling reasons to watch African movies, but here are three:

Diversity: African cinema is incredibly diverse, with filmmakers from across the continent exploring a wide range of themes and styles.

From the powerful dramas of Senegal’s Ousmane Sembène to the energetic comedies of Nigeria’s Nollywood, African films offer a window into the rich and varied cultures of the continent.

Representation: Watching African movies is a way to see stories and perspectives that are often marginalized or overlooked in mainstream Western media.

African films provide a platform for African voices to be heard and offer a more nuanced and complex view of the continent than is often portrayed in Western media.

Artistic Merit: African cinema has produced some of the most important and influential films in the history of world cinema.

From the groundbreaking work of pioneers like Sembène and Djibril Diop Mambéty to the more recent successes of filmmakers like Mati Diop and Wanuri Kahiu, African films have pushed the boundaries of what is possible in filmmaking and contributed to the global artistic conversation.

Watching African movies is a way to appreciate the beauty and creativity of cinema from across the continent.

Best African Movies – Wrap Up

In conclusion, African cinema is a rich and diverse world, with a wide range of films that explore a variety of themes and issues.

From historical epics to intimate character studies, African movies offer a unique perspective on the human experience, with a focus on the struggles and triumphs of people living in the continent.

Some of the best African movies include “Black Girl,” a groundbreaking Senegalese film that explores issues of colonialism and racial identity, “Cairo Station.”

An Egyptian drama that examines the lives of working-class people in Cairo, and “Lionheart,” a Nigerian comedy-drama that explores issues of gender and family.

Other noteworthy African films include “Moolaadé,” a powerful drama from Senegal that explores issues of female genital mutilation and the role of tradition in modern society.

“The Nightingale’s Prayer,” an Egyptian melodrama that explores issues of class and gender, and “Timbuktu,” a Malian drama that explores the impact of Islamic fundamentalism on everyday life.

Overall, African cinema is a vital and exciting part of the global film landscape, with a wealth of talent and creativity waiting to be discovered by audiences around the world.