Charles Laughton was a legendary actor who starred in some of the most iconic films of the 20th century. Born in 1899 in Scarborough, England, Laughton began his acting career on the stage before transitioning to film in the 1930s.

He quickly became known for his captivating performances and ability to inhabit a wide range of characters.

Over the course of his career, Laughton appeared in dozens of films, earning critical acclaim and a devoted fanbase. He won an Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in the 1933 film “The Private Life of Henry VIII” and was nominated for several others.

Laughton was also a talented director, helming the classic thriller “Night of the Hunter” in 1955.

Best Charles Laughton Movies

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at some of the best Charles Laughton movies, including his most memorable performances and standout roles. Whether you’re a diehard fan or just getting to know Laughton’s work, there’s something on this list for everyone.

1. Witness for the Prosecution (1957)

Directed by Billy Wilder, “Witness for the Prosecution” is widely regarded as one of Charles Laughton’s finest performances.

Laughton plays Sir Wilfrid Robarts, a brilliant defense attorney who takes on the case of Leonard Vole, a man accused of murdering an elderly woman. As the trial unfolds, Robarts begins to suspect that his client may be guilty, leading to a dramatic and suspenseful finale.

Laughton’s performance in “Witness for the Prosecution” is captivating, with his character displaying both wit and vulnerability.

He expertly navigates the twists and turns of the courtroom drama, keeping the audience on the edge of their seats. The film also features impressive performances from Marlene Dietrich and Tyrone Power, but it’s Laughton’s portrayal of Sir Wilfrid that truly steals the show.

Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
  • Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
  • Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
  • Marlene Dietrich, Tyrone Power, Charles Laughton (Actors)
  • Billy Wilder (Director) - Witness for the Prosecution (1957) (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

2. Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)

In “Mutiny on the Bounty,” Charles Laughton plays Captain Bligh, a ruthless and tyrannical leader who clashes with his crew during a voyage to Tahiti.

Laughton’s portrayal of the sadistic Bligh is intense and unforgettable, capturing the character’s cruelty and ambition with chilling precision.

Laughton’s performance in “Mutiny on the Bounty” earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, and the film itself won the Oscar for Best Picture.

   

The movie is a classic adventure epic, with breathtaking seascapes and a thrilling plot that keeps the audience engaged from start to finish. Laughton’s performance as Captain Bligh is one of the standout elements of the film, cementing his status as one of Hollywood’s greatest actors.

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Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Clark Gable, Charles Laughton, Franchot Tone (Actors)
  • Frank Lloyd (Director) - Talbot Jennings (Writer) - Irving Thalberg (Producer) - Charles Nordhoff...
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

3. Les Misérables (1935)

In the 1935 film adaptation of Victor Hugo’s classic novel “Les Misérables,” Charles Laughton plays Inspector Javert, the dogged police officer who pursues Jean Valjean (played by Fredric March), a former convict who has reinvented himself as a successful businessman.

Laughton’s portrayal of Javert is nuanced and complex, highlighting the character’s internal struggle between duty and empathy.

Laughton’s performance in “Les Misérables” is often cited as one of his best, showcasing his range and ability to embody complex characters.

The film is a faithful adaptation of Hugo’s novel, with stunning visuals and a compelling storyline that explores themes of redemption and social justice.

Laughton’s portrayal of Javert is an impressive element of the film, bringing depth and pathos to a character who could have been one-dimensional in less capable hands.

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Les Miserables (Cinema Classics Collection) (1935 / 1952)
  • Fredric March, Charles Laughton, Michael Rennie (Actors)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

4. Advise & Consent (1962)

“Advise & Consent” is a 1962 political drama film directed by Otto Preminger, featuring an ensemble cast including Charles Laughton in a supporting role.

In the film, Laughton plays Senator Seabright Cooley, a southern senator who is a staunch conservative and opposes the confirmation of a liberal nominee for Secretary of State.

Laughton’s performance in “Advise & Consent” is memorable, as he imbues the character of Senator Cooley with a combination of charm, wit, and ruthlessness.

Despite being a supporting character, Laughton’s portrayal of Senator Cooley is a standout element of the film, adding depth and complexity to the political intrigue at the center of the story.

“Advise & Consent” is a well-crafted political drama that delves into the inner workings of Washington D.C. and the political machinations of those in power.

   

Laughton’s performance is just one of many excellent performances in the film, making it a must-see for fans of political thrillers and classic cinema.

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Advise and Consent
  • DVD
  • Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Black & White
  • English (Subtitled), Spanish (Subtitled), French (Subtitled)
  • 1
  • 139

5. The Suspect (1944)

In “The Suspect,” Charles Laughton plays Philip Marshall, a mild-mannered London businessman who becomes the prime suspect in a murder case.

As the evidence against him mounts, Marshall’s life spirals out of control, with his only hope for redemption resting on the shoulders of a sympathetic barmaid (played by Ella Raines).

Laughton’s performance in “The Suspect” is a tour-de-force, as he expertly portrays the character’s descent into paranoia and desperation.

The film is a moody and atmospheric thriller, with a gripping plot that keeps the audience guessing until the very end. Laughton’s performance is the standout element of the film, showcasing his ability to convey complex emotions with subtle nuances.

“The Suspect” is a lesser-known film in Laughton’s career, but it’s a must-see for fans of classic thrillers and fans of the actor’s work. It’s a masterclass in acting and a testament to Laughton’s ability to command the screen.

The Suspect
  • Charles Laughton, Ella Raines, Dean Harens (Actors)
  • Robert Siodmak (Director)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

6. Spartacus (1960)

In “Spartacus,” Charles Laughton plays Gracchus, a Roman senator who is sympathetic to the plight of the slaves and secretly supports the rebellion led by the gladiator Spartacus (played by Kirk Douglas).

   

Laughton’s performance as Gracchus is charismatic and witty, with the character serving as a moral compass in a story that explores themes of freedom and oppression.

Laughton’s performance in “Spartacus” is one of the standout elements of the film, with his character providing a counterpoint to the ruthless and corrupt Roman leaders.

The film itself is a sprawling epic, with impressive battle scenes and a gripping storyline that explores the complexities of power and revolution. Laughton’s portrayal of Gracchus adds depth and humanity to the story, making him one of the most memorable characters in the film.

“Spartacus” is a classic film that features a talented cast, with Charles Laughton’s performance as Gracchus being one of the many reasons why it’s still celebrated today.

Spartacus (1960)
  • English, French, Spanish (Subtitles)

7. The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933)

In “The Private Life of Henry VIII,” Charles Laughton plays the titular monarch, bringing a larger-than-life quality to the role of the infamous king.

Laughton’s performance in the film is both powerful and nuanced, capturing Henry’s flamboyance and volatility, as well as his more vulnerable and human moments.

“The Private Life of Henry VIII” is a historical drama that explores the various marriages of Henry VIII and the political and personal ramifications of his decisions.

The film was a critical and commercial success, earning Laughton an Academy Award for Best Actor and establishing him as one of the leading actors of his generation.

Laughton’s portrayal of Henry VIII in “The Private Life of Henry VIII” is considered by many to be one of his finest performances, showcasing his ability to inhabit complex characters with depth and authenticity.

The film itself is a classic of the historical drama genre, with stunning costumes and sets, and a captivating storyline that captures the imagination of audiences even today.

The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933)
  • Charles Laughton, Merle Oberon, Elsa Lanchester (Actors)
  • Alexander Korda (Director) - Lajos Biro (Writer) - Alexander Korda (Producer)

8. Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)

In “Ruggles of Red Gap,” Charles Laughton plays Marmaduke Ruggles, an English butler who becomes an unwitting symbol of American individualism when he is sold to a wealthy American couple while on vacation in Paris.

Laughton’s performance in the film is both comedic and heartfelt, as he navigates the cultural differences between England and America and ultimately finds his own sense of identity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qqTZCWJLqY&pp=ygUhUnVnZ2xlcyBvZiBSZWQgR2FwICgxOTM1KXRyYWlsZXIg

“Ruggles of Red Gap” is a charming and witty comedy that explores themes of class and cultural differences with a light touch. Laughton’s performance as Ruggles is an impressive element of the film, showcasing his ability to bring depth and humanity to even the most comedic of roles.

While “Ruggles of Red Gap” is not as well-known as some of Laughton’s other films, it remains a beloved classic of the comedy genre, with a talented cast and a witty script that still resonates with audiences today.

Ruggles of Red Gap
  • Charles Laughton, Charlie Ruggles, Roland Young (Actors)
  • Leo McCarey (Director) - Walter DeLeon (Writer) - Arthur Hornblow (Producer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

9. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939)

In “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” Charles Laughton delivers a stunning performance as Quasimodo, the deformed bell-ringer of Notre Dame Cathedral in 15th century Paris.

Laughton’s portrayal of the tragic character is both moving and unforgettable, capturing the pathos of Quasimodo’s isolation and loneliness, as well as his fierce loyalty and love.

“The Hunchback of Notre Dame” is a classic film adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel, with Laughton’s performance as Quasimodo being widely regarded as one of the finest portrayals of the character in cinematic history.

The film is a visual feast, with stunning sets and costumes that bring the world of medieval Paris to life.

Laughton’s performance in “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” is a testament to his versatility as an actor, with the role requiring him to convey a wide range of emotions and physicality.

The film remains a beloved classic of the historical drama genre, with Laughton’s performance as Quasimodo being one of the incredible elements of the production.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939)
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Charles Laughton, Cedric Hardwicke, Maureen O'Hara (Actors)
  • William Dieterle (Director) - Sonya Levien (Writer) - Pandro S. Berman (Producer) - Victor Hugo...
  • English, French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

10. The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934)

In “The Barretts of Wimpole Street,” Charles Laughton plays Edward Moulton-Barrett, the domineering father of poet Elizabeth Barrett.

Laughton’s performance in the film is intense and commanding, capturing the character’s obsession with controlling his daughter’s life and his own deteriorating mental state.

“The Barretts of Wimpole Street” is a drama that explores the complicated relationship between Elizabeth Barrett and her father, as well as her romance with fellow poet Robert Browning.

Laughton’s portrayal of Edward Moulton-Barrett is a highlight of the film, with the character serving as a formidable antagonist to Elizabeth’s aspirations for independence and love.

Laughton’s performance in “The Barretts of Wimpole Street” is a testament to his range as an actor, showcasing his ability to convey both the humanity and the darkness of his characters.

The film itself is a classic of the historical drama genre, with a talented cast and a gripping storyline that captures the imagination of audiences even today.

Barretts of Wimpole Street, The
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Sidney Franklin (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

11. This Land Is Mine (1943)

In “This Land Is Mine,” Charles Laughton plays Albert Lory, a timid schoolteacher who becomes a hero when he stands up to Nazi occupiers during World War II.

Laughton’s performance in the film is both poignant and powerful, capturing the character’s transformation from meek and fearful to brave and resolute.

“This Land Is Mine” is a wartime drama that explores themes of resistance and heroism, with Laughton’s portrayal of Albert Lory serving as the emotional heart of the film.

The character’s journey is both relatable and inspiring, as he finds the courage to stand up against oppression and fight for what is right.

Laughton’s performance in “This Land Is Mine” is a testament to his ability to convey complex emotions and character development with subtlety and nuance.

The film remains a classic of the wartime drama genre, with a talented cast and a compelling storyline that speaks to the enduring human struggle for freedom and justice.

This Land Is Mine (1943)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Charles Laughton, Maureen O'Hara, George Sanders (Actors)
  • Jean Renoir (Director) - Dudley Nichols (Writer) - Dudley Nichols (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

12. Hobson’s Choice (1954)

In “Hobson’s Choice,” Charles Laughton plays Henry Hobson, a stubborn and domineering bootmaker in 19th century England.

Laughton’s performance in the film is a masterclass in comedic timing and character development, as he portrays Hobson’s gradual realization that his own self-importance is holding him back from true happiness.

“Hobson’s Choice” is a charming and witty comedy that explores themes of class, gender roles, and family dynamics, with Laughton’s portrayal of Henry Hobson as the centerpiece of the film.

The character’s journey from cantankerous old man to a more self-aware and compassionate individual is both heartwarming and hilarious, with Laughton’s performance garnering critical acclaim.

Laughton’s performance in “Hobson’s Choice” is a testament to his range as an actor, with the role requiring him to convey both humor and pathos, as well as to navigate the complexities of the character’s relationships with his daughters and his employees.

The film remains a beloved classic of the comedy genre, with Laughton’s performance as Henry Hobson being one of the awesome parts of the production.

13. The Big Clock (1948)

In “The Big Clock,” Charles Laughton plays Earl Janoth, the ruthless and controlling head of a publishing empire.

Laughton’s performance in the film is both chilling and captivating, capturing the character’s sense of power and paranoia as he becomes embroiled in a web of deceit and murder.

“The Big Clock” is a film noir thriller that explores themes of identity, manipulation, and the corrupting influence of power.

Laughton’s portrayal of Earl Janoth is a awesome parts of the film, with the character serving as a formidable antagonist to the film’s protagonist, George Stroud, played by Ray Milland.

Laughton’s performance in “The Big Clock” is a testament to his ability to convey both menace and vulnerability, with the character’s inner turmoil and desperation driving much of the film’s tension and suspense.

The film remains a classic of the film noir genre, with a talented cast and a gripping storyline that keeps audiences on the edge of their seats.

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14. The Paradise Case (1947)

The Paradine Case is a 1947 American film noir courtroom drama film, set in England, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and produced by David O. Selznick.

The screenplay was written by Selznick and an uncredited Ben Hecht, from an adaptation by Alma Reville and James Bridie of the 1933 novel of the same title by Robert Smythe Hichens.

The film stars Gregory Peck, Ann Todd, Alida Valli, Charles Laughton, Charles Coburn, Ethel Barrymore, and Louis Jourdan. 

It tells of an English barrister who falls in love with a woman who is accused of murder, and how it affects his relationship with his wife.

The Paradine Case
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

15. Young Bess (1953)

In “Young Bess,” Charles Laughton plays King Henry VIII, a powerful and mercurial monarch in 16th century England.

Laughton’s performance in the film is both regal and captivating, capturing the character’s charisma and complexity as he navigates the tumultuous political landscape of his time.

“Young Bess” is a historical drama that explores the early life of Queen Elizabeth I, with Laughton’s portrayal of King Henry VIII serving as a key element of the film’s storyline.

The character’s relationships with his daughter Elizabeth, his wives, and his advisors are explored in depth, with Laughton’s performance bringing a sense of gravitas and depth to the proceedings.

Laughton’s performance in “Young Bess” is a testament to his versatility as an actor, with the role requiring him to convey both strength and vulnerability, as well as to navigate the nuances of historical accuracy and dramatic storytelling.

The film remains a classic of the historical drama genre, with Laughton’s performance as King Henry VIII being one of the impressive parts of the production.

Young Bess (1953)
  • Young Bess (1953)
  • Young Bess (1953)
  • Jean Simmons, Stewart Granger, Deborah Kerr (Actors)
  • Arthur Wimperis (Director) - Young Bess (1953) (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

16. Rembrandt (1936)

In “Rembrandt,” Charles Laughton portrays the famous Dutch painter, Rembrandt van Rijn. Laughton’s performance in the film is a tour-de-force, showcasing his ability to capture the depth and complexity of an artistic genius.

“Rembrandt” is a biographical drama that explores the life and works of the celebrated painter, with Laughton’s portrayal of the titular character serving as the heart of the film.

The character’s relationships, struggles, and creative process are all explored in detail, with Laughton bringing a sense of humanity and passion to the role.

Laughton’s performance in “Rembrandt” is a testament to his ability to convey nuance and depth in his acting, with the role requiring him to portray a wide range of emotions and experiences.

The film remains a classic of the biographical drama genre, with Laughton’s performance as Rembrandt being one of the awesome elements of the production.

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Rembrandt [DVD]
  • Rembrandt - DVD Brand New
  • Charles Laughton, Gertrude Lawrence, Elsa Lanchester (Actors)
  • Alexander Korda (Director) - Carl Zuckmayer (Writer)
  • Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

17. Payment Deferred (1932)

In “Payment Deferred,” Charles Laughton plays William Marble, a middle-aged clerk who finds himself in dire financial straits. Laughton’s performance in the film is a masterful portrayal of a man whose desperation drives him to commit a terrible crime.

“Payment Deferred” is a crime drama that explores the psychological and moral consequences of a desperate act, with Laughton’s portrayal of William Marble serving as the centerpiece of the film.

The character’s descent into darkness is depicted with nuance and complexity, with Laughton capturing the character’s sense of desperation and moral ambiguity.

Laughton’s performance in “Payment Deferred” is a testament to his ability to convey both sympathy and revulsion in his acting, with the role requiring him to portray a character whose actions are both understandable and reprehensible.

The film remains a classic of the crime drama genre, with Laughton’s performance as William Marble being one of the standout elements of the production.

Payment Deferred
  • Forester, C. S. (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 170 Pages - 01/01/2022 (Publication Date) - Classy Publishing (Publisher)

18. The Sign of the Cross (1932)

In “The Sign of the Cross,” Charles Laughton plays the Emperor Nero, a tyrannical ruler of ancient Rome. Laughton’s performance in the film is a mesmerizing portrayal of a man consumed by his own power and delusions of grandeur.

“The Sign of the Cross” is a historical epic that explores the conflicts between the early Christians and the Roman Empire, with Laughton’s portrayal of Nero serving as a chilling representation of evil and corruption.

The character’s arrogance, cruelty, and madness are all conveyed with intensity and conviction, with Laughton bringing a sense of depth and complexity to the role.

Laughton’s performance in “The Sign of the Cross” is a testament to his ability to convey both grandeur and depravity in his acting, with the role requiring him to portray a character whose actions and beliefs are both despicable and captivating.

The film remains a classic of the historical epic genre, with Laughton’s performance as Nero being one of the standout elements of the production.

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The Sign of the Cross
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Fredric March, Elissa Landi, Claudette Colbert (Actors)
  • Cecil B. DeMille (Director)
  • French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

19. O. Henry’s Full House (1952)

In “O. Henry’s Full House,” Charles Laughton appears in the segment titled “The Clarion Call.” Laughton’s performance in the film is a delightful portrayal of a colorful and eccentric character named “The Cisco Kid.”

“O. Henry’s Full House” is an anthology film that presents a series of short stories by the celebrated American writer O. Henry. In “The Clarion Call,” Laughton’s character is a vagabond who finds himself in possession of a stolen gun and becomes embroiled in a comic misadventure.

Laughton’s performance in “The Clarion Call” is a testament to his versatility as an actor, with the role requiring him to convey both humor and pathos.

The character’s quirks and idiosyncrasies are all captured with a sense of whimsy and charm, making Laughton’s portrayal of The Cisco Kid one of the standout elements of the film.

O. Henry's Full House
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Fred Allen, Anne Baxter, Jeanne Crain (Actors)
  • Jean Negulesco (Director)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

20. If I Had a Million (1932)

In “If I Had a Million,” Charles Laughton appears in the segment titled “The Clerk.” Laughton’s performance in the film is a poignant portrayal of a lonely and unfulfilled man who unexpectedly inherits a large sum of money.

“If I Had a Million” is a comedy-drama that tells the story of a wealthy tycoon who decides to give away one million dollars to different people at random.

In “The Clerk,” Laughton’s character is a middle-aged office worker who receives a windfall and must navigate the challenges that come with newfound wealth.

Laughton’s performance in “The Clerk” is a testament to his ability to convey vulnerability and sensitivity in his acting.

The character’s loneliness and longing are all captured with a sense of empathy and depth, making Laughton’s portrayal a standout in the film. Despite being one of several segments, Laughton’s performance in “The Clerk” remains memorable and emotionally resonant.

If I Had a Million ~ W.C. Fields
  • If I Had A Million
  • W.C. Fields
  • Gary Cooper
  • Charles Laughton
  • George Raft

21. Jamaica Inn (1939)

In “Jamaica Inn,” Charles Laughton plays Sir Humphrey Pengallan, a corrupt and cruel local magistrate who is involved in smuggling along the Cornish coast of England.

Laughton’s performance in the film is a masterclass in portraying villainous characters, with the actor bringing a sense of menace and unpredictability to the role.

“Jamaica Inn” is a period drama that tells the story of a young woman who arrives at her uncle’s inn, only to discover that it is a hub for smugglers.

Laughton’s portrayal of Sir Humphrey Pengallan serves as a primary antagonist in the film, with the character’s conniving and manipulative behavior creating a sense of tension and danger.

Laughton’s performance in “Jamaica Inn” is a testament to his ability to create memorable and complex characters, with Sir Humphrey Pengallan being one of his most memorable villainous roles.

The character’s cruelty and malice are all conveyed with a sense of relish and intensity, making Laughton’s performance a standout in the film.

Jamaica Inn - 1939
  • Charles Laughton, Maureen O’Hara, Robert Newton (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Sidney Gilliat (Writer)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

22. I, Claudius (1937)

I, Claudius was a production of Alexander Korda, directed by Josef von Sternberg and starring Charles Laughton (as Claudius), Emlyn Williams (as Caligula), Flora Robson (as Livia), and Merle Oberon (as Messalina).

Also in the cast were Allan Aynesworth (as Senator Asiaticus) and John Clements (as Valens). Other speaking parts included Claudius’s servant Narcissus, Claudius’ doctor Xenophon, Senator Sentius, and soldiers Cassius and Lupus.

Laughton based his interpretation of Claudius on King Edward VIII and his abdication speech.[citation needed]

The production was dogged by “ill circumstances”. Oberon was injured in a car accident 16 March 1937, suffering facial cuts and a slight concussion. On 26 March 1937, it was announced that the film was abandoned.

 Suspicions that the accident was used as a pretext for cancelling the troubled production surfaced within days, when columnist Sheilah Graham reported that quarrels between.

Korda and Laughton over Laughton’s interpretation of Claudius was “the real reason work on the picture has been halted, not the serious injuries supposedly suffered by the leading lady, Merle Oberon, in a London auto crash.”

London Films received an £80,000 (£5.49 million today) settlement from Prudential Insurance that reduced the production’s losses to date.

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I, Claudius [DVD]
  • Condition: New
  • Format: DVD
  • Color; Dolby; DVD; NTSC
  • Derek Jacobi, John Hurt, Si�n Phillips (Actors)
  • Herbert Wise (Director) - Jack Pulman (Writer)

23. Sidewalks of London (1938)

I, Claudius was a production of Alexander Korda, directed by Josef von Sternberg and starring Charles Laughton (as Claudius), Emlyn Williams (as Caligula), Flora Robson (as Livia), and Merle Oberon (as Messalina).

Also in the cast were Allan Aynesworth (as Senator Asiaticus) and John Clements (as Valens).

Other speaking parts included Claudius’s servant Narcissus, Claudius’ doctor Xenophon, Senator Sentius, and soldiers Cassius and Lupus. Laughton based his interpretation of Claudius on King Edward VIII and his abdication speech.[citation needed]

The production was dogged by “ill circumstances”.

Oberon was injured in a car accident 16 March 1937, suffering facial cuts and a slight concussion. On 26 March 1937, it was announced that the film was abandoned.

Suspicions that the accident was used as a pretext for canceling the troubled production surfaced within days.

When columnist Sheilah Graham reported that quarrels between Korda and Laughton over Laughton’s interpretation of Claudius was “the real reason work on the picture has been halted, not the serious injuries supposedly suffered by the leading lady, Merle Oberon, in a London auto crash.

London Films received an £80,000 (£5.49 million today) settlement from Prudential Insurance that reduced the production.

24. Salome (1953)

In “Salome,” Charles Laughton plays King Herod, the ruler of Judea, who is captivated by the beauty of Salome, played by Rita Hayworth. Laughton’s performance in the film is a powerful portrayal of a man consumed by lust and desire, leading to tragic consequences.

“Salome” is a biblical drama that tells the story of Salome, the stepdaughter of King Herod, who demands the head of John the Baptist as a reward for performing a seductive dance.

Laughton’s performance as King Herod is a tour de force, with the actor bringing a sense of pomp and cruelty to the character, while also conveying his inner turmoil and weaknesses.

Laughton’s performance in “Salome” is a testament to his ability to inhabit complex characters, with the character of King Herod being one of his most memorable roles.

The film’s striking visuals, including Hayworth’s iconic dance, are all enhanced by Laughton’s commanding presence and performance, making “Salome” a must-watch for fans of the actor.

SALOME (1953)
  • Rita Hayworth, Stewart Granger, Charles Laughton (Actors)
  • William Dieterle (Director) - Buddy Adler (Producer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

25. Under Ten Flags (1960)

In “Under Ten Flags,” Charles Laughton plays Admiral Canaris, the head of German military intelligence during World War II. Laughton’s performance in the film is a nuanced and complex portrayal of a man caught between loyalty to his country and a sense of moral responsibility.

“Under Ten Flags” is a war drama that tells the story of a German submarine crew who are captured by Allied forces and imprisoned.

Laughton’s character, Admiral Canaris, is portrayed as a complicated figure who is aware of the atrocities being committed by the Nazis but is also fiercely patriotic and loyal to his country.

Laughton’s performance in “Under Ten Flags” is a standout, with the actor bringing a sense of gravitas and depth to the character of Admiral Canaris.

Despite his character’s involvement in the war, Laughton is able to convey a sense of empathy and humanity that makes his performance all the more powerful.

“Under Ten Flags” is not only a gripping war drama but also a showcase for Charles Laughton’s exceptional acting talent.

3 Reasons To Watch Charles Laughton Movies

Charles Laughton was a celebrated English stage and film actor who appeared in many iconic films throughout his career. Here are three reasons to watch Charles Laughton movies:

Incredible Acting: Laughton was widely regarded as one of the greatest actors of his generation, with a talent for playing a wide range of characters. He was equally skilled at playing comedic and dramatic roles, and his ability to bring complex characters to life was unmatched.

Range of Genres: Laughton appeared in movies from a wide range of genres, including drama, comedy, and horror.

He starred in classics such as “Mutiny on the Bounty,” “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” and “Witness for the Prosecution.” Regardless of the genre, Laughton’s performances were always memorable and captivating.

Timeless Appeal: Laughton’s movies have stood the test of time and continue to be beloved by audiences today.

His films are timeless classics that offer a glimpse into a bygone era of Hollywood. Laughton’s legacy as one of the greatest actors in film history is secure, and his movies remain relevant and entertaining to this day.

Best Anthony Quinn Movies – Wrap Up

Anthony Quinn was a prolific actor with a career spanning over six decades, appearing in more than 100 films.

He was known for his powerful performances and versatility, with a range of roles that included everything from Greek heroes to Mexican revolutionaries to circus strongmen. Quinn won two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor and was nominated for four others.

His films remain classics of the Golden Age of Hollywood and continue to be celebrated today. In this series of prompts, we will explore some of the best Anthony Quinn movies, highlighting his most memorable performances and the impact he had on cinema.