Max von Sydow was a Swedish-French actor who had a long and prolific career in film and television. He was known for his commanding presence on screen and his ability to portray complex characters with nuance and depth.

Von Sydow worked with some of the most acclaimed directors in cinema, including Ingmar Bergman, Martin Scorsese, and Steven Spielberg.

Some of the best Max von Sydow movies include “The Seventh Seal” (1957), a classic film directed by Ingmar Bergman in which von Sydow plays a knight who challenges Death to a game of chess; “The Exorcist” (1973).

A horror film directed by William Friedkin in which von Sydow plays a priest who performs an exorcism; and “Three Days of the Condor” (1975), a political thriller directed by Sydney Pollack in which von Sydow plays a mysterious assassin.

Other notable films in his career include “Wild Strawberries” (1957), “The Passion of Anna” (1969), “The Emigrants” (1971), “Flash Gordon” (1980), “Hannah and Her Sisters” (1986), “Dune” (1984), and “Minority Report” (2002).

Best Max von Sydow Movies

Max von Sydow was widely regarded as one of the greatest actors of his generation and left an indelible mark on cinema with his memorable performances and impressive body of work.

1. Pelle the Conqueror (1987)

“Pelle the Conqueror” is a Danish-Swedish film directed by Bille August, based on the novel of the same name by Martin Andersen Nexø. The film stars Max von Sydow and Pelle Hvenegaard in the lead roles.

The film is set in the late 19th century and tells the story of a Swedish immigrant named Lasse (von Sydow) and his son Pelle (Hvenegaard), who travel to Denmark in search of work and a better life.

They eventually find work on a farm owned by a wealthy family, but Pelle faces discrimination and abuse due to his status as an immigrant.

Monica Bellucci does not appear in “Pelle the Conqueror,” as the film’s cast primarily consists of Scandinavian actors.

The film received critical acclaim upon its release, winning the Palme d’Or at the 1988 Cannes Film Festival and earning Oscar nominations for Best Foreign Language Film and Best Actor (von Sydow). It is considered a classic of Scandinavian cinema and a poignant portrayal of the struggles faced by immigrants and the working class.

Pelle The Conqueror (1987) Pelle Hvenegaard, Max von Sydow, Erik Paaske [DVd, Import, All Regions, NTSC]
  • Pelle Hvenegaard, Max von Sydow, Erik Paaske (Actors)
  • Bille August (Director)
  • Korean, English, Japanese (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

2. The Exorcist (1973)

The Exorcist is a classic horror film released in 1973, directed by William Friedkin and based on the novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty. The movie stars Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, and Max von Sydow.

The plot revolves around a young girl named Regan (Linda Blair) who becomes possessed by a demonic entity.

   

Her mother, Chris (Ellen Burstyn), enlists the help of two priests, Father Karras (Jason Miller) and Father Merrin (Max von Sydow), to perform an exorcism and rid Regan of the demon.

The movie was groundbreaking in its depiction of horror, particularly for its intense and graphic scenes of possession and exorcism.

It was also notable for its realistic and subtle portrayal of the psychological toll that the events take on the characters.

The Exorcist was both a critical and commercial success, receiving ten Academy Award nominations and winning two. It has since become a cultural phenomenon and is widely regarded as one of the greatest horror movies of all time.

The film has inspired multiple sequels, prequels, and adaptations, as well as countless imitations and parodies.

The Exorcist
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Ellen Burstyn, Max von Sydow, Linda Blair (Actors)
  • William Friedkin (Director) - William Peter Blatty (Writer) - William Peter Blatty (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

3. The Seventh Seal (1957)

“The Seventh Seal” is a 1957 Swedish drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman and starring Max von Sydow.

The film tells the story of a medieval knight named Antonius Block, who returns home from the Crusades to find his country ravaged by the plague. As he contemplates the meaning of life and the existence of God, he plays a game of chess with Death, hoping to delay his inevitable fate.

Considered a masterpiece of world cinema, “The Seventh Seal” is widely regarded as one of Bergman’s greatest works and a seminal film in the history of European cinema.

The film’s exploration of existential themes and its stark imagery have had a lasting impact on the art house and avant-garde film movements, inspiring generations of filmmakers and cinephiles.

The iconic scene of the knight playing chess with Death has become one of the most recognizable images in film history.

“The Seventh Seal” is a deeply philosophical and thought-provoking film that continues to captivate audiences with its timeless themes and stunning visuals.

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The Seventh Seal (50th Anniversary Special Edition) [1957] [DVD]
  • The Seventh Seal ( Det Sjunde inseglet ) ( The 7th Seal )
  • The Seventh Seal
  • Det Sjunde inseglet
  • The 7th Seal
  • Gunnar Björnstrand, Max von Sydow, Bibi Andersson (Actors)

   

4. The Virgin Spring (1960)

“The Virgin Spring” is a Swedish drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman and released in 1960.

It is based on a medieval Swedish ballad called “Töres döttrar i Wänge” and tells the story of a young girl named Karin, who is on her way to church when she is raped and murdered by a group of herdsmen.

The film explores themes of violence, revenge, and redemption, and is widely regarded as one of Bergman’s greatest works.

Here are three reasons to watch “The Virgin Spring”:

Ingmar Bergman’s Direction: Bergman is widely regarded as one of the greatest filmmakers of all time, and “The Virgin Spring” is a prime example of his mastery of the art form.

His direction is nuanced and effective, and he skillfully creates an atmosphere of tension and dread throughout the film.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBf4PnJGkZk&pp=ygUfVGhlIFZpcmdpbiBTcHJpbmcgKDE5NjApdHJhaWxlcg%3D%3D

Max von Sydow’s Performance: Max von Sydow, who plays Karin’s father Töre in the film, delivers a powerful and nuanced performance that captures the character’s grief, anger, and thirst for revenge.

His portrayal is one of the highlights of the film, and his final scene is particularly haunting and affecting.

Themes of Justice and Redemption: “The Virgin Spring” explores complex themes of justice, revenge, and redemption, and raises thought-provoking questions about the nature of violence and its impact on individuals and society.

   

The film’s exploration of these themes is both timeless and relevant, and its message resonates strongly with audiences today.

The Virgin Spring (English Subtitled)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Max von Sydow, Birgitta Valberg, Gunnel Lindblom (Actors)
  • Ingmar Bergman (Director) - Ulla Isaksson (Writer) - Ingmar Bergman (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

5. Wild Strawberries (1957)

“Wild Strawberries” is a Swedish drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman. Here are some reasons to watch this classic movie:

Profound Exploration of Life: “Wild Strawberries” is a profound exploration of life, death, aging, and the human condition.

The film tells the story of an elderly professor who goes on a road trip to receive an honorary degree, but his journey becomes a reflection on his own life and the choices he has made. The film is introspective and thought-provoking, and it poses deep questions about existence.

Beautiful Cinematography: The film features stunning black and white cinematography, which captures the beauty of the Swedish countryside and the melancholic atmosphere of the story.

The camera work is inventive and imaginative, with dream sequences and flashbacks that add to the poetic nature of the film.

Strong Performances: The film features strong performances from its cast, particularly from veteran actor Victor Sjöström, who plays the lead role of the professor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBf4PnJGkZk&pp=ygUfVGhlIFZpcmdpbiBTcHJpbmcgKDE5NjApdHJhaWxlcg%3D%3D

Sjöström brings a depth of emotion to his performance, capturing the character’s regrets, fears, and hopes.

Influence on Film History: “Wild Strawberries” is considered a landmark in the history of cinema, as it helped to establish Ingmar Bergman as one of the most important filmmakers of his generation.

The film’s themes and style have inspired many other filmmakers over the years, and it continues to be studied and admired by film scholars and cinephiles.

Overall, “Wild Strawberries” is a timeless classic that rewards viewers with its deep insights, poetic imagery, and moving performances. It is a must-see for anyone interested in cinema and in exploring the meaning of life.

The Virgin Spring (English Subtitled)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Max von Sydow, Birgitta Valberg, Gunnel Lindblom (Actors)
  • Ingmar Bergman (Director) - Ulla Isaksson (Writer) - Ingmar Bergman (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

6. The Emigrants (1971)

“The Emigrants” is a 1971 Swedish drama film directed by Jan Troell. The film is based on a series of novels by Vilhelm Moberg and tells the story of a group of Swedish peasants who emigrate to the United States in the mid-19th century in search of a better life.

The film follows the struggles and hardships of the emigrants as they face poverty, illness, and discrimination in their new country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgfJTnh1vc0&pp=ygUcVGhlIEVtaWdyYW50cyAoMTk3MSkpdHJhaWxlcg%3D%3D

Despite the challenges they face, the emigrants remain hopeful and determined to succeed, and their resilience and perseverance make for a compelling and inspiring story.

“The Emigrants” was a critical and commercial success, and was nominated for several Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actress for Liv Ullmann’s performance.

The film’s realistic portrayal of the immigrant experience and its exploration of themes such as identity, community, and the search for a better life have made it a classic of Swedish cinema and an important work in the history of immigration films.

The Emigrants / The New Land (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Max von Sydow, Liv Ullmann (Actors)
  • Jan Troell (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

7. Shutter Island (2010)

“Shutter Island” is a psychological thriller film released in 2010, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, and Ben Kingsley. The movie is based on the 2003 novel of the same name by Dennis Lehane.

The story is set in the 1950s and follows US Marshal Teddy Daniels (DiCaprio) and his new partner Chuck Aule (Ruffalo) as they travel to Shutter Island.

A remote island off the coast of Massachusetts, to investigate the disappearance of a patient from a maximum-security psychiatric hospital.

Teddy and Chuck encounter a range of strange and eerie characters on the island, including the hospital’s director, Dr. John Cawley (Kingsley), and Teddy begins to have vivid hallucinations of his dead wife.

As Teddy delves deeper into the investigation, he begins to uncover a web of conspiracies, secrets, and lies that suggest the hospital may not be what it seems.

The movie explores themes of mental illness, trauma, and the nature of reality, as Teddy’s grip on his own sanity begins to slip.

Without giving away too many spoilers, the movie’s twist ending has been widely discussed and debated since its release, leaving many viewers with a sense of uncertainty and confusion about the events of the film.

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Shutter Island (2010) (Blu-ray)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley (Actors)
  • Martin Scorsese (Director)
  • English, French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

8. Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

“Through a Glass Darkly” is a Swedish drama film directed by Ingmar Bergman, released in 1961. The film tells the story of a family on vacation on a remote island in the Baltic Sea.

The family consists of the father, David, a successful writer; the daughter, Karin, who has recently been released from a mental hospital; the son, Minus, who is struggling with his own sexuality; and the father’s mistress, who is also along for the trip.

The film explores themes of mental illness, family dynamics, and the search for meaning in life. Karin, who is suffering from schizophrenia, experiences hallucinations and delusions throughout the film, and her family struggles to understand and cope with her illness.

Meanwhile, Minus begins to explore his own sexual desires, leading to tension between him and his father.

The title of the film comes from the Bible, specifically from 1 Corinthians 13:12, which reads: “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.

” The quote refers to the idea that our understanding of the world and of ourselves is limited and imperfect, but that one day we will have a fuller understanding of truth.

“Through a Glass Darkly” is considered one of Bergman’s masterpieces and won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1962. It is often cited as a landmark film in the history of cinema for its exploration of complex psychological themes.

Its unconventional narrative structure.

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9. Awakenings (1990)

“Awakenings” is a 1990 American drama film directed by Penny Marshall, based on a true story and adapted from the book of the same name by Oliver Sacks.

The movie stars Robin Williams as Dr. Malcolm Sayer, a fictionalized version of Sacks, who administers a new drug to a group of catatonic patients who had been in a state of suspended animation for decades following an outbreak of encephalitis lethargica in the 1920s.

Robert De Niro plays Leonard Lowe, one of the patients who awakens from his catatonic state and is able to communicate and interact with others for the first time in decades.

The film explores the emotional and psychological impact of the patients’ awakening on their lives, as well as on the doctors and nurses who care for them.

“Awakenings” was critically acclaimed and received three Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actor for De Niro, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

The film is considered a powerful portrayal of the human capacity for hope and resilience in the face of adversity.

Awakenings
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Robert De Niro, Robin Williams, Julie Kavner (Actors)
  • Penny Marshall (Director) - Oliver Sacks (Writer) - Walter F. Parkes (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

10. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

“The Diving Bell and the Butterfly” is a 2007 French biographical drama film directed by Julian Schnabel. It is based on the memoir of the same name by Jean-Dominique Bauby, who was the editor-in-chief of French fashion magazine Elle.

The film tells the story of Bauby, who suffers a massive stroke that leaves him with “locked-in syndrome,” a condition in which he is completely paralyzed except for his left eye.

He communicates with the world by blinking his left eyelid, which is the only part of his body he can still move. Despite this, Bauby maintains his sense of humor and creativity, and dictates his memoir to a transcriber using a system in which he blinks to indicate letters and words.

The film received critical acclaim and was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography, and Best Editing.

It won several other awards, including the Golden Globe Award for Best Director and the BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

The film is known for its unique cinematography, which uses a first-person point of view to give the audience a sense of what it’s like to be trapped in a paralyzed body.

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The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
  • Mathieu Amalric, Emmanuelle Seigner, Marie-Jose Croze (Actors)
  • Julian Schnabel (Director) - Jean-Dominique Bauby (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)

11. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)

“Hannah and Her Sisters” is a comedy-drama film written and directed by Woody Allen, released in 1986. The film features an ensemble cast, including Mia Farrow, Dianne Wiest, Michael Caine, Barbara Hershey, Carrie Fisher, and Woody Allen himself.

The film follows the intertwined lives and relationships of three sisters: Hannah (Mia Farrow), Holly (Dianne Wiest), and Lee (Barbara Hershey), and their partners and friends.

The story takes place over a two-year period, with the characters facing various personal and professional struggles and complications.

Michael Caine plays Elliot, Hannah’s husband, who develops a crush on Lee, Hannah’s sister. Meanwhile, Holly struggles to find her footing in life and career, while Lee grapples with her relationship with a struggling artist played by Max von Sydow.

The film was well-received by critics and audiences, and won several awards, including three Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor (Michael Caine).

Best Supporting Actress (Dianne Wiest), and Best Original Screenplay (Woody Allen). It is widely considered to be one of Woody Allen’s best films.

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Hannah and Her Sisters
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Woody Allen, Mia Farrow, Michael Caine (Actors)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)

12. The New Land (1972)

The New Land is a Swedish film directed by Jan Troell and released in 1972. It is the sequel to the film “The Emigrants” (1971) and is based on the novels by Vilhelm Moberg.

The film follows the lives of a group of Swedish immigrants who settle in Minnesota in the mid-19th century and the challenges they face in building a new life in a new land.

The film stars Max von Sydow as Karl Oskar, a farmer who is struggling to make a living on his new land, and Liv Ullmann as his wife Kristina, who is trying to adapt to her new surroundings while also caring for their growing family.

The film explores themes of hardship, perseverance, and the sacrifices that immigrants often make in pursuit of a better life.

The New Land was a critical and commercial success, both in Sweden and internationally. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and won numerous awards at film festivals around the world.

The film is widely regarded as one of the best Swedish films ever made and a classic of world cinema.

The Emigrants / The New Land (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Max von Sydow, Liv Ullmann (Actors)
  • Jan Troell (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

13. Winter Light (1963)

Winter Light is a 1963 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman. The film tells the story of a small-town Swedish pastor named Tomas Ericsson, who is struggling with his faith and his personal relationships.

The film is set during a cold and dark winter, which serves as a metaphor for Tomas’ inner turmoil.

The film is the second in Bergman’s “Faith Trilogy,” which also includes the films Through a Glass Darkly and The Silence.

Winter Light explores themes of existentialism, religious doubt, and the search for meaning in a seemingly meaningless world.

The film stars Gunnar Björnstrand as Tomas Ericsson, as well as Ingrid Thulin and Max von Sydow in supporting roles. The film is known for its minimalist style and stark black-and-white cinematography, which emphasizes the bleakness of Tomas’ world.

Winter Light has been widely praised for its powerful performances, its exploration of complex themes, and its stark visual style. It is considered one of Bergman’s greatest works and a classic of Swedish cinema.

Winter Light
  • NTSC
  • Max Von Sydow (Actor)
  • Ingmar Bergman (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)

14. The Magician (1958)

“The Magician” (Swedish title: “Ansiktet”) is a 1958 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman. It tells the story of Albert Emanuel Vogler (Max von Sydow), a traveling magician who claims to possess supernatural powers.

Vogler is invited to perform for a group of skeptical scientists who are attempting to expose him as a fraud.

The film explores themes of religion, superstition, and rationality, as well as the relationship between the performer and his audience.

The characters are complex and multifaceted, with Vogler’s assistant, Mr. Aman (Ingrid Thulin), serving as a voice of reason and a counterpoint to the more mystic aspects of the story.

As the performance progresses, tensions between the scientists and Vogler rise, leading to a dramatic and unexpected climax. The film is notable for its use of symbolism and imagery, including the recurring image of a tarot card featuring the figure of Death.

“The Magician” was not initially well received by audiences or critics, but it has since become recognized as a classic of Swedish cinema and one of Bergman’s most significant works.

The film was also notable for being the first collaboration between Bergman and cinematographer Sven Nykvist, who went on to work together on many of Bergman’s most famous films.

The Magician (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Max von Sydow, Gunnar Bjornstrand (Actors)
  • Ingmar Bergman (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

15. Miss Julie (1951)

“Miss Julie” is a Swedish drama film directed by Alf Sjöberg, released in 1951. The film is based on the play of the same name by August Strindberg, which was first performed in 1888.

The story takes place on Midsummer’s Eve in the late 19th century and follows the interaction between the titular character, Miss Julie, and her father’s valet, Jean, as they engage in a power struggle fueled by their differing social status and gender.

Throughout the film, Miss Julie and Jean engage in a passionate and tumultuous affair, which ultimately leads to tragic consequences. The film explores themes of class conflict, sexual desire, and the oppressive societal norms of the time.

“Miss Julie” is known for its innovative cinematography and use of close-ups, which heighten the intense emotional tension between the two main characters. The film also features strong performances by the lead actors, particularly by Anita Björk as Miss Julie and Ulf Palme as Jean.

The film won the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival in 1951 and was praised for its bold and provocative exploration of taboo themes. It has since been regarded as a classic of Swedish cinema and a groundbreaking work in the history of European art films.

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16. Minority Report (2002)

“Minority Report” is a 2002 American science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Cruise.

The movie is based on a short story of the same name by Philip K. Dick and is set in the year 2054, where the Washington D.C. police department has a new tool to prevent crime: a system that can predict murders before they happen, based on the visions of three “precogs” who can see the future.

Cruise plays John Anderton, a police officer in charge of the “pre-crime” unit who is himself accused of a future murder. Anderton then goes on the run to prove his innocence and uncover a conspiracy that threatens the entire pre-crime system.

The film explores themes of free will, determinism, and the ethics of law enforcement, as well as the impact of technology on society.

It features groundbreaking special effects and was praised for its thought-provoking storyline and fast-paced action. “Minority Report” was a commercial and critical success, grossing over $350 million worldwide and receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Sound Editing.

Minority report
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell, Samantha Morton (Actors)
  • Steven Spielberg (Director) - Scott Frank (Writer) - Bonnie Curtis (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

17. Europa (1991)

“Europa” is a 1991 Danish art-house film directed by Lars von Trier. It is the second film in von Trier’s Europa Trilogy, which also includes “The Element of Crime” and “Epidemic.”

Set in Germany just after World War II, the film follows the story of an idealistic young American named Leopold Kessler (played by Jean-Marc Barr), who travels to Germany to work for the rebuilding of the country.

He takes a job as a sleeping-car conductor for the Zentropa railway company, which is owned by a wealthy and eccentric family.

Kessler soon finds himself drawn into a web of intrigue and danger, as he becomes involved with a mysterious woman named Katharina Hartmann (played by Barbara Sukowa) and her father, an influential industrialist named Max Hartmann (played by Jørgen Reenberg).

The film is shot in black and white, with occasional splashes of color, and features a surreal and dreamlike atmosphere.

“Europa” received critical acclaim upon its release and was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. It is known for its unique visual style, its use of narration and meta-cinematic techniques, and its exploration of themes such as guilt, trauma, and the legacy of World War II.

Europa (1991 Film)
  • Audio CD – Audiobook
  • xxx (Publisher)

18. Shame (1968)

“Shame” is a Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman, released in 1968. The film is a political allegory set in an unspecified country in the midst of civil war.

The story follows the lives of a married couple, Jan and Eva Rosenberg, played by Max von Sydow and Liv Ullmann respectively, as they struggle to survive in a society torn apart by violence and chaos.

Jan is a successful doctor, but his life is upended when war breaks out, and he and his wife are forced to flee their home.

As they journey through the war-torn countryside, they encounter a variety of characters, some of whom help them and others who threaten their safety. Along the way, they confront their own fears, weaknesses, and moral dilemmas, and the strain of the war takes a toll on their relationship.

The film is known for its stark, haunting imagery and powerful performances by von Sydow and Ullmann. It is widely regarded as one of Bergman’s most political and socially conscious films, and was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1968.

“Shame” is a harrowing and deeply affecting portrayal of the human toll of war and violence, and remains a powerful and relevant film today.

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Shame (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Max von Sydow, Liv Ullmann (Actors)
  • Ingmar Bergman (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

19. Three Days of the Condor (1975)

Three Days of the Condor is a political thriller film directed by Sydney Pollack and released in 1975. The film stars Robert Redford as Joseph Turner, a CIA analyst who discovers that his entire office has been killed while he was out getting lunch.

Turner is then forced to go on the run and try to uncover the truth behind the killings while evading the CIA and other government agencies who are trying to capture him.

The film also stars Faye Dunaway as a photographer who helps Turner and Max von Sydow as a mysterious assassin who is pursuing him. The film explores themes of government corruption, conspiracy, and the role of intelligence agencies in American society.

Three Days of the Condor was a critical and commercial success upon its release, and is now considered a classic of the political thriller genre.

The film was praised for its suspenseful plot, strong performances, and its commentary on the political climate of the 1970s. It has since inspired numerous imitations and parodies, and its influence can be seen in many subsequent films and TV shows.

Three Days of the Condor (1975) [Masters of Cinema] Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD)
  • Polish Release, cover may contain Polish text/markings. The disk DOES NOT have English audio and...
  • Robert Redford, Faye Dunaway, Max von Sydow (Actors)
  • Sydney Pollack (Director)

20. Dune (1984)

Dune is a 1984 science-fiction film directed by David Lynch, based on the novel of the same name by Frank Herbert.

The film is set in the distant future on the desert planet Arrakis, which is the only known source of the valuable substance called “spice,” a drug that enhances mental abilities and is essential for interstellar travel.

The film follows the story of young nobleman Paul Atreides (played by Kyle MacLachlan), whose family has been given control of Arrakis by the Emperor.

However, they soon discover that their assignment is a trap set by their enemies, the Harkonnens, who plan to eliminate the Atreides family and take control of the planet.

The film features a star-studded cast, including Max von Sydow, Francesca Annis, Jurgen Prochnow, and Sting. It also features a distinctive soundtrack by the electronic music group Tangerine Dream.

Although Dune has gained a cult following over the years, it was a box-office disappointment upon its release and received mixed reviews from critics.

Some praised the film’s visual effects and production design, while others criticized its confusing storyline and deviations from the source material.

Despite its mixed reception, Dune remains a significant entry in the science-fiction genre and has influenced numerous other films and TV shows.

Dune
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Kyle MacLachlan, Virginia Madsen, Patrick Stewart (Actors)
  • David Lynch (Director) - Frank Herbert (Writer) - Raffaella Delaurentiis (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

3 Reasons To Watch Max von Sydow Movies

Max von Sydow was a highly acclaimed actor known for his powerful performances in a wide range of films, from epic dramas to psychological thrillers. Here are three reasons why you should watch his movies:

Unforgettable Performances: Max von Sydow was a master of his craft and gave unforgettable performances in a wide range of roles.

From his iconic turn as Father Merrin in “The Exorcist” to his haunting portrayal of the knight in “The Seventh Seal,” von Sydow brought a depth and intensity to his characters that made them memorable and resonant.

Versatility: Von Sydow was a versatile actor who could effortlessly move between different genres and styles.

He played everything from biblical figures to political leaders, and his ability to bring humanity and complexity to even the most challenging roles was a testament to his skill and talent.

Collaboration with Great Directors: Von Sydow worked with some of the greatest directors of his time, including Ingmar Bergman, Martin Scorsese, and Woody Allen.

His collaborations with these filmmakers resulted in some of the most powerful and thought-provoking films of the past century, and his performances were often the highlight of these works.

Overall, Max von Sydow’s movies are worth watching for their powerful performances, versatility, and collaborations with great directors. He was a true master of his craft and his films continue to captivate and inspire audiences today.

Best Max von Sydow Movies – Wrap Up

Max von Sydow was a Swedish actor known for his distinctive voice, commanding presence, and remarkable range as a performer. He appeared in over 100 films throughout his career, spanning several decades and genres. Here are some of his best movies:

The Seventh Seal (1957) – Directed by Ingmar Bergman, this iconic film features von Sydow as a disillusioned knight who plays a game of chess with Death.

The Exorcist (1973) – Von Sydow played Father Merrin, a Catholic priest who battles a demonic possession in this horror classic.

Wild Strawberries (1957) – In this Bergman film, von Sydow plays a hitchhiker who encounters a disillusioned elderly professor on a road trip.

Three Days of the Condor (1975) – Von Sydow plays a hitman hired to kill a CIA analyst in this political thriller.

Pelle the Conqueror (1987) – Von Sydow received an Academy Award nomination for his portrayal of a Swedish immigrant struggling to survive in Denmark in the late 19th century.

Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) – In this Woody Allen film, von Sydow plays a sensitive artist who becomes romantically involved with one of the titular sisters.

Minority Report (2002) – Von Sydow plays the head of the pre-crime division in this sci-fi thriller directed by Steven Spielberg.

Flash Gordon (1980) – Von Sydow plays the villainous Emperor Ming the Merciless in this campy space opera.

The Quiller Memorandum (1966) – Von Sydow plays a Nazi sympathizer in this Cold War spy thriller.

Shutter Island (2010) – In Martin Scorsese’s psychological thriller, von Sydow plays a mysterious psychiatrist on a remote island.

These films represent just a fraction of von Sydow’s impressive body of work, and showcase his versatility as an actor across a range of genres and styles.