Edward G. Robinson was an American actor who appeared in over 100 films during his career, which spanned from the early 1920s until his death in 1973. 

Robinson is perhaps best known for his portrayal of gangsters and tough guys in classic films such as “Little Caesar” and “Double Indemnity,” but he also had a range of other roles throughout his career.

Robinson’s distinctive voice and intense acting style made him a standout performer, and his legacy as a Hollywood icon has endured long after his passing.

Best Edward G. Robinson Movies

In this article, we’ll explore some of Robinson’s best films, highlighting the performances and characters that made him one of the most memorable actors of his generation.

1.Double Indemnity (1944)

“Double Indemnity” is a classic film noir from 1944 directed by Billy Wilder, based on a novel by James M. Cain.

Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Barton Keyes, an insurance investigator who becomes suspicious of an insurance claim filed by a man named Walter Neff (played by Fred MacMurray).

Robinson’s performance as Keyes is exceptional, as he portrays a sharp and intuitive investigator who has a deep understanding of the insurance business.

He brings a level of intelligence and intensity to the role, making it clear that he won’t rest until he has uncovered the truth behind the suspicious claim. Robinson’s chemistry with MacMurray is also a highlight of the film, as the two actors play off each other perfectly in their scenes together.

“Double Indemnity” is a classic film noir that features some of Robinson’s finest work. His performance as Barton Keyes is one of the standout performances in the film, and it is a testament to his talent as an actor.

Double Indemnity
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robinson (Actors)
  • Billy Wilder (Director) - Billy Wilder (Writer) - Buddy G. DeSylva (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

2.Key Largo (1948)

“Key Largo” is a 1948 crime-drama film directed by John Huston, based on a play by Maxwell Anderson. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Johnny Rocco, a notorious gangster who takes over a hotel in the Florida Keys during a hurricane.

Robinson’s performance as Rocco is intense and commanding, showcasing his ability to play a ruthless and manipulative character.

He dominates the screen with his presence, delivering his lines with a chilling conviction that makes it clear he is not to be trifled with.

Robinson’s scenes with Humphrey Bogart, who plays the lead character, are particularly memorable, as the two actors have a palpable tension and conflict that drives the film forward.

“Key Largo” is a masterclass in acting, and Robinson’s performance as Johnny Rocco is one of the film’s greatest strengths. He brings a level of menace and danger to the character that is both captivating and terrifying, cementing his place as one of Hollywood’s most talented actors.

Key Largo (1948)
  • Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Edward G. Robinson (Actors)
  • John Huston (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)

3.Larceny, Inc (1942)

“Larceny, Inc.” is a 1942 comedy film directed by Lloyd Bacon. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of “Pressure” Maxwell, a reformed criminal who, upon his release from prison, decides to start a legitimate business with his former cellmates by buying a luggage store.

Robinson’s performance as “Pressure” Maxwell is a departure from his usual tough guy roles, as he plays a comedic character who is trying to go straight.

He brings a level of charm and humor to the role, displaying a range that was not often seen in his more dramatic performances.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Broderick Crawford and Jane Wyman, is a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together a joy to watch.

“Larceny, Inc.” may not be as well-known as some of Robinson’s other films, but it is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

His performance as “Pressure” Maxwell is a standout in the film, and it demonstrates that he was capable of playing a wide range of characters with equal skill and talent.

Larceny, Inc. (1942)
  • Edward G. Robinson, Jane Wyman, Broderick Crawford (Actors)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

4.The Ten Commandments (1956)

“The Ten Commandments” is a 1956 epic film directed by Cecil B. DeMille, which tells the story of Moses and the Hebrews’ exodus from Egypt. Edward G.

Robinson plays the role of Dathan, a Hebrew slave who becomes a trusted advisor to the Pharaoh and betrays his people for personal gain.

Robinson’s performance as Dathan is a standout in the film, as he brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character.

He portrays Dathan as a man torn between his loyalty to his people and his desire for power and wealth, and he delivers his lines with a sense of gravitas that makes it clear he is a force to be reckoned with.

Robinson’s scenes with Charlton Heston, who plays Moses, are particularly memorable, as the two actors have a palpable tension and conflict that drives the film forward.

“The Ten Commandments” is a classic Hollywood epic, and Robinson’s performance as Dathan is one of the film’s greatest strengths. He brings a level of depth and humanity to the character that elevates the film and makes it a timeless classic.

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The Ten Commandments (1956)
  • Anne Baxter, Charlton Heston, Yvonne De Carlo (Actors)
  • Cecil B. DeMille (Director)
  • Audience Rating: G (General Audience)

5.House of Strangers (1949)

“House of Strangers” is a 1949 film noir directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Gino Monetti, an Italian-American banker who is betrayed by his own sons and sent to prison.

Robinson’s performance as Gino Monetti is powerful and emotional, as he portrays a man who is struggling to come to terms with the betrayal of his own family.

He brings a level of depth and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey complex emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Richard Conte and Susan Hayward, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“House of Strangers” is a lesser-known film in Robinson’s career, but it is a showcase of his talent as an actor. His performance as Gino Monetti is a standout in the film, and it is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most complex and difficult characters.

House of Strangers
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Edward G. Robinson, Susan Hayward, Richard Conte (Actors)
  • Joseph L. Mankiewicz (Director) - Jerome Weidman (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

6.All My Sons (1948)

“All My Sons” is a 1948 drama film directed by Irving Reis, based on the play by Arthur Miller. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Joe Keller, a businessman who is confronted with the consequences of his past actions.

Robinson’s performance as Joe Keller is powerful and poignant, as he portrays a man who is grappling with guilt and shame over his role in a tragedy that has affected many lives.

He brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Burt Lancaster and Mady Christians, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“All My Sons” is a compelling drama that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Joe Keller is a standout in the film, and it is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

All My Sons (1948)
  • Edward G. Robinson, Burt Lancaster, Mady Christians (Actor)
  • Irving Reis (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

7.The Sea Wolf (1941)

“The Sea Wolf” is a 1941 adventure-drama film directed by Michael Curtiz, based on the novel by Jack London. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Wolf Larsen, the tyrannical captain of a ship who clashes with a passenger named Humphrey van Weyden, played by Ida Lupino.

Robinson’s performance as Wolf Larsen is a tour de force, as he portrays a brutal and merciless sea captain who rules his ship with an iron fist.

He brings a level of intensity and ferocity to the character, delivering his lines with a sense of conviction that makes it clear he is not to be trifled with.

Robinson’s scenes with Lupino are particularly memorable, as the two actors have a palpable tension and conflict that drives the film forward.

“The Sea Wolf” is a classic Hollywood adventure film, and Robinson’s performance as Wolf Larsen is one of the film’s greatest strengths.

He brings a level of menace and danger to the character that is both captivating and terrifying, cementing his place as one of Hollywood’s most talented actors.

8.The Last Gangster (1937)

“The Last Gangster” is a 1937 crime-drama film directed by Edward Ludwig. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Joe Krozac, a notorious gangster who is released from prison after serving 20 years for a crime he didn’t commit.

Robinson’s performance as Joe Krozac is powerful and intense, as he portrays a man who has been wronged by the justice system and is seeking revenge.

He brings a level of nuance and complexity to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including James Stewart and Rose Stradner, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“The Last Gangster” is a classic Hollywood crime-drama, and Robinson’s performance as Joe Krozac is a standout in the film. It is a testament to his talent as an actor that he is able to bring such depth and humanity to a character who is often portrayed as a one-dimensional villain.

The Sea Wolf (1941)
  • Edward G. Robinson, Alexander Knox, Ida Lupino (Actors)
  • Michael Curtiz (Director)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

9.Illegal (1955)

“Illegal” is a 1955 crime-drama film directed by Lewis Allen. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Victor Scott, a tough district attorney who bends the law to get a conviction.

Robinson’s performance as Victor Scott is commanding and intense, as he portrays a man who is determined to see justice done, even if it means crossing ethical lines.

He brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Nina Foch and Hugh Marlowe, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Illegal” is a compelling crime-drama that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Victor Scott is a standout in the film, and it is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

Illegal (1955)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Edward G. Robinson, Nina Foch, Hugh Marlowe (Actors)
  • Lewis Allen (Director) - W.R. Burnett (Writer) - Frank Rosenberg (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

10.Little Caesar (1931)

“Little Caesar” is a 1931 crime-drama film directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Rico Bandello, a small-time crook who rises to the top of the criminal underworld.

Robinson’s performance as Rico Bandello is iconic, as he portrays a ruthless and ambitious gangster who will stop at nothing to get what he wants.

He brings a level of intensity and ferocity to the character, delivering his lines with a sense of conviction that makes it clear he is a force to be reckoned with.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Glenda Farrell, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Little Caesar” is a classic Hollywood crime-drama, and Robinson’s performance as Rico Bandello is one of the film’s greatest strengths.

It is a testament to his talent as an actor that he is able to bring such depth and humanity to a character who is often portrayed as a one-dimensional villain.

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Little Caesar [DVD]
  • Edward G. Robinson, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Glenda Farrell (Actors)
  • Elmer Clifton (Director) - Darryl F. Zanuck (Writer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

11.A Slight Case of Murder (1938)

“A Slight Case of Murder” is a 1938 comedy film directed by Lloyd Bacon. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Remy Marko, a former bootlegger who is forced to go back into business when Prohibition ends.

Robinson’s performance as Remy Marko is a departure from his usual tough guy roles, as he plays a comedic character who is trying to navigate the changing times.

He brings a level of charm and humor to the role, displaying a range that was not often seen in his more dramatic performances.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Ruth Donnelly and Allen Jenkins, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“A Slight Case of Murder” may not be as well-known as some of Robinson’s other films, but it is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

His performance as Remy Marko is a standout in the film, and it demonstrates that he was capable of playing a wide range of characters with equal skill and talent.

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A Slight Case of Murder
  • Edward G. Robinson, John Litel, Jane Bryan (Actors)
  • Lloyd Bacon (Director)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

12.Soylent Green (1973)

“Soylent Green” is a 1973 science fiction film directed by Richard Fleischer. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Sol Roth, a police detective who helps investigate a conspiracy in a dystopian future where overpopulation and pollution have created a food shortage.

Robinson’s performance as Sol Roth is poignant and powerful, as it was his final film role before his death. He brings a level of depth and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-star Charlton Heston is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Soylent Green” is a classic science fiction film, and Robinson’s performance as Sol Roth is one of the film’s greatest strengths. It is a testament to his talent as an actor that he was able to deliver such a powerful and memorable performance in his final film role.

Soylent Green
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Charlton Heston, Leigh Taylor-Young, Chuck Connors (Actors)
  • Richard Fleischer (Director) - Stanley Greenberg (Writer) - Walter Seltzer (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

13.The Cincinnati Kid (1965)

“The Cincinnati Kid” is a 1965 drama film directed by Norman Jewison. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Lancey Howard, a legendary poker player who is challenged by a young up-and-comer named “The Kid,” played by Steve McQueen.

Robinson’s performance as Lancey Howard is a standout in the film, as he portrays a seasoned poker player who has seen it all.

He brings a level of gravitas and wisdom to the character, delivering his lines with a sense of conviction that makes it clear he is a force to be reckoned with.

Robinson’s chemistry with McQueen is also a highlight of the film, as the two actors have a palpable tension and respect that drives the film forward.

“The Cincinnati Kid” is a classic Hollywood drama that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Lancey Howard is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Steve McQueen, Edward G. Robinson, Ann-Margret (Actors)
  • Norman Jewison (Director) - Ring Lardner Jr. (Writer) - Martin Ransohoff (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

14.The Woman in the Window (1944)

“The Woman in the Window” is a 1944 film noir directed by Fritz Lang. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Richard Wanley, a married college professor who becomes involved with a mysterious woman named Alice Reed, played by Joan Bennett.

Robinson’s performance as Richard Wanley is a standout in the film, as he portrays a man who is drawn into a dangerous game of deception and murder.

He brings a level of nuance and complexity to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen. Robinson’s chemistry with Bennett is also a highlight of the film, as the two actors have a palpable tension and attraction that drives the film forward.

“The Woman in the Window” is a classic film noir that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Richard Wanley is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

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15.The Whole Town’s Talking (1935)

“The Whole Town’s Talking” is a 1935 comedy film directed by John Ford. Edward G. Robinson plays the dual roles of Arthur Ferguson Jones, a meek and mild-mannered clerk, and “Killer” Mannion, a notorious gangster who looks identical to Jones.

Robinson’s performance as both Arthur Ferguson Jones and “Killer” Mannion is a standout in the film, as he portrays two very different characters with equal skill and talent.

He brings a level of nuance and humor to both roles, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-star Jean Arthur is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“The Whole Town’s Talking” is a lesser-known film in Robinson’s career, but it is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

His performance as both Arthur Ferguson Jones and “Killer” Mannion is a testament to his talent and ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

16.Bullets or Ballots (1936)

“Bullets or Ballots” is a 1936 crime-drama film directed by William Keighley. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Johnny Blake, a tough cop who goes undercover to bring down a crime syndicate.

Robinson’s performance as Johnny Blake is powerful and intense, as he portrays a man who is willing to do whatever it takes to bring the criminals to justice.

He brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Joan Blondell and Barton MacLane, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Bullets or Ballots” is a classic Hollywood crime-drama, and Robinson’s performance as Johnny Blake is one of the film’s greatest strengths.

It is a testament to his talent as an actor that he is able to bring such depth and humanity to a character who is often portrayed as a one-dimensional hero.

Bullets or Ballots (1936)
  • Edward G. Robinson, Joan Blondell, Barton MacLane (Actors)
  • William Keighley (Director)
  • English, French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

17.Cheyenne Autumn (1964)

“Cheyenne Autumn” is a 1964 western film directed by John Ford. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Secretary of the Interior Carl Schurz, who is tasked with negotiating a peace treaty with the Cheyenne tribe.

Robinson’s performance as Carl Schurz is a standout in the film, as he portrays a man who is trying to do what is right in the face of political pressure and public opinion.

He brings a level of gravitas and wisdom to the character, delivering his lines with a sense of conviction that makes it clear he is a force to be reckoned with.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Richard Widmark and Carroll Baker, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Cheyenne Autumn” is a classic western that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Carl Schurz is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

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18.The Prize (1963)

“The Prize” is a 1963 suspense-thriller film directed by Mark Robson. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Dr. Max Stratman, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who is kidnapped by a group of spies.

Robinson’s performance as Dr. Max Stratman is a standout in the film, as he portrays a brilliant scientist who is forced to use his knowledge for nefarious purposes.

He brings a level of intelligence and intensity to the character, delivering his lines with a sense of conviction that makes it clear he is a force to be reckoned with.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Paul Newman and Elke Sommer, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“The Prize” is a classic Hollywood suspense-thriller that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Dr. Max Stratman is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

The Prize (1963) [Blu-ray]
  • Paul Newman, Elke Sommer, Edward G. Robinson (Actors)
  • Mark Robson (Director)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

19.The Outrage (1964)

“The Outrage” is a 1964 western film directed by Martin Ritt. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Con Man, a character based on the classic Shakespearean villain Iago, in a retelling of the story of “Othello.”

Robinson’s performance as Con Man is powerful and intense, as he portrays a man who is determined to manipulate and deceive those around him.

He brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Paul Newman and Claire Bloom, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“The Outrage” is a unique western that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor.

His performance as Con Man is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters, and his portrayal of a Shakespearean villain in a western setting is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

The Prize (1963) [Blu-ray]
  • Paul Newman, Elke Sommer, Edward G. Robinson (Actors)
  • Mark Robson (Director)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

20.A Hole in the Head (1959)

“A Hole in the Head” is a 1959 comedy-drama film directed by Frank Capra. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Mario Manetta, a widowed father who struggles to provide for his young son while trying to keep his Miami Beach hotel afloat.

Robinson’s performance as Mario Manetta is a departure from his usual tough guy roles, as he plays a comedic character who is trying to navigate the challenges of parenthood and business ownership.

He brings a level of charm and humor to the role, displaying a range that was not often seen in his more dramatic performances.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Frank Sinatra and Eleanor Parker, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“A Hole in the Head” may not be as well-known as some of Robinson’s other films, but it is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

His performance as Mario Manetta is a standout in the film, and it demonstrates that he was capable of playing a wide range of characters with equal skill and talent.

A Hole in the Head [DVD]
  • Frank Sinatra, Edward G. Robinson, Eleanor Parker (Actors)
  • Frank Capra (Director) - Arnold Schulman (Writer)
  • Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

21.The Little Giant (1933)

“The Little Giant” is a 1933 comedy film directed by Roy Del Ruth. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of “Bugs” Ahearn, a former Chicago gangster who moves to California to start a new life.

Robinson’s performance as “Bugs” Ahearn is a departure from his usual tough guy roles, as he plays a comedic character who is trying to leave his criminal past behind.

He brings a level of charm and humor to the role, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-star Mary Astor is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“The Little Giant” is a lesser-known film in Robinson’s career, but it is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

His performance as “Bugs” Ahearn is a standout in the film, and it demonstrates that he was capable of playing a wide range of characters with equal skill and talent.

A Hole in the Head [DVD]
  • Frank Sinatra, Edward G. Robinson, Eleanor Parker (Actors)
  • Frank Capra (Director) - Arnold Schulman (Writer)
  • Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

22.Brother Orchid (1940)

“Brother Orchid” is a 1940 crime-comedy film directed by Lloyd Bacon. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Little John Sarto, a gangster who decides to leave the criminal life behind and become a monk.

Robinson’s performance as Little John Sarto is a standout in the film, as he portrays a tough guy with a soft heart who is trying to find redemption.

He brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Ann Sothern and Humphrey Bogart, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Brother Orchid” is a unique crime-comedy that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor. His performance as Little John Sarto is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters.

The film is also notable for its mix of humor and drama, which Robinson handles with equal skill and talent.

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23.Kid Galahad (1937)

“Kid Galahad” is a 1937 sports-drama film directed by Michael Curtiz. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Nick Donati, a boxing promoter who takes under his wing a young boxer named Kid Galahad, played by Bette Davis.

Robinson’s performance as Nick Donati is a standout in the film, as he portrays a tough but caring boxing promoter who wants to make Kid Galahad a champion.

He brings a level of intensity and passion to the character, delivering his lines with a sense of conviction that makes it clear he is a force to be reckoned with.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-stars, including Bette Davis and Humphrey Bogart, is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Kid Galahad” is a classic Hollywood sports-drama that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor.

His performance as Nick Donati is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters, and his portrayal of a boxing promoter is one of the highlights of the film.

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24.Good Neighbor Sam (1964)

“Good Neighbor Sam” is a 1964 comedy film directed by David Swift. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Simon Nurdlinger, a wealthy businessman who agrees to pretend to be a suburban neighbor in order to help a struggling advertising executive.

Robinson’s performance as Simon Nurdlinger is a departure from his usual tough guy roles, as he plays a comedic character who is trying to help out his new friends.

He brings a level of charm and humor to the role, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-star Jack Lemmon is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Good Neighbor Sam” is a lesser-known film in Robinson’s career, but it is a testament to his versatility as an actor.

His performance as Simon Nurdlinger is a standout in the film, and it demonstrates that he was capable of playing a wide range of characters with equal skill and talent.

Good Neighbor Sam
  • 1964 - Pocket Books - 1st Edition - Paperback
  • Good Neighbor Sam - By Jack Finney - Movie Tie In
  • Stars: Jack Lemmon, Edward G. Robinson, Romy Schneider
  • VG Condition - Unread condition
  • Very Collectible

25.Scarlet Street (1945)

“Scarlet Street” is a 1945 film noir directed by Fritz Lang. Edward G. Robinson plays the role of Christopher Cross, a middle-aged cashier who becomes involved with a young woman named Kitty, played by Joan Bennett.

Robinson’s performance as Christopher Cross is a standout in the film, as he portrays a man who is trapped in a life of quiet desperation and unfulfilled dreams.

He brings a level of complexity and nuance to the character, showcasing his ability to convey a range of emotions and motivations on screen.

Robinson’s chemistry with his co-star Joan Bennett is also a highlight of the film, as they play off each other with a natural ease that makes their scenes together feel authentic and genuine.

“Scarlet Street” is a classic Hollywood film noir that showcases Robinson’s talent as an actor.

His performance as Christopher Cross is a testament to his ability to bring humanity and depth to even the most challenging and complex characters, and his portrayal of a man struggling to find meaning in his life is one of the highlights of the film.

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Scarlet Street
  • Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett, Dan Duryea (Actors)
  • Fritz Lang (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

3 Reasons To Watch Edward G. Robinson Movies

Versatile Actor: Edward G. Robinson was a versatile actor who was able to portray a wide range of characters, from tough gangsters to comedic businessmen to dramatic scientists. His ability to bring depth and nuance to his roles makes his performances a must-see for any film lover.

Classic Hollywood: Robinson was a prominent actor during the golden age of Hollywood, and his films are a reflection of the era’s style, themes, and social commentary.

Watching his movies is not only a chance to appreciate his talent as an actor, but also to experience the classic Hollywood era.

Influence on Pop Culture: Robinson’s iconic roles have influenced pop culture for generations. From his portrayal of gangster Little Caesar to his voice work in the Looney Tunes cartoons, his impact on popular culture is undeniable.

Watching his movies is a chance to see the origins of many iconic characters and catchphrases that have become a part of our cultural lexicon.

Best Edward G. Robinson Movies – Wrap Up

In conclusion, Edward G. Robinson was an incredibly talented actor whose career spanned several decades and a wide variety of roles.

From his iconic portrayal of gangsters to his comedic performances and dramatic roles, Robinson left a lasting impact on the film industry and pop culture as a whole.

Some of his best movies include “Double Indemnity,” “Key Largo,” “Larceny, Inc.,” “The Ten Commandments,” “House of Strangers,” “All My Sons,” “The Sea Wolf,” “The Last Gangster,” “Illegal,” “Little Caesar,” “A Slight Case of Murder,” “Soylent Green.”

“The Cincinnati Kid,” “The Woman in the Window,” “The Whole Town’s Talking,” “Bullets or Ballots,” “Cheyenne Autumn,” “The Prize,” “The Outrage,” “A Hole in the Head,” “Brother Orchid,” “Kid Galahad,” “Good Neighbor Sam,” and “Scarlet Street.”

Watching these films is not only a chance to appreciate Robinson’s incredible talent as an actor, but also to experience the classic Hollywood era and the enduring impact of his iconic roles.