Gregory Peck was one of the most iconic actors of Hollywood’s Golden Age, known for his handsome looks, dignified presence, and powerful performances.

He appeared in over 50 films during his career, spanning several genres from war dramas to westerns to romantic comedies.

In this list, we’ll explore some of the best Gregory Peck movies that showcase his talent and enduring appeal.

Best Gregory Peck Movies

From his Academy Award-winning role in “To Kill a Mockingbird” to his commanding performance in “The Guns of Navarone,” these films demonstrate why Gregory Peck remains a beloved figure in the history of cinema.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 American drama film directed by Robert Mulligan and starring Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, and Robert Duvall.

The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name by Harper Lee and tells the story of a young girl named Scout (Badham) and her brother Jem (Phillip Alford) growing up in a small Southern town in the 1930s.

Their father, Atticus Finch (Peck), is a lawyer who defends a black man falsely accused of raping a white woman, and the trial exposes the town’s racial prejudices and social divisions.

The film explores themes such as justice, morality, prejudice, and the loss of innocence.

To Kill a Mockingbird was notable for its powerful performances, particularly by Peck, who won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Atticus Finch, and Badham, who received critical acclaim for her role as Scout.

The film was also praised for its faithful adaptation of the novel, its haunting musical score, and its poignant portrayal of the South during a turbulent time in American history.

To Kill a Mockingbird was a critical and commercial success, and it remains a beloved classic of American cinema.

The film has been praised for its influence on the civil rights movement and its continuing relevance in modern society.

It was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry in 1995, and it has been adapted into numerous stage plays, television shows, and other forms of media.

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To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Gregory Peck, Mary Badham, Phillip Alford (Actors)
  • Robert Mulligan (Director) - Horton Foote (Writer) - Alan J. Pakula (Producer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

2. Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)

“Gentleman’s Agreement” is an American drama film released in 1947, directed by Elia Kazan and starring Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire, and John Garfield. The film tells the story of a journalist named Phil Green who poses as a Jew to expose the prevalence of anti-Semitism in post-World War II America.

   

The film is notable for its exploration of a sensitive and controversial topic at the time, and its nuanced portrayal of complex characters and relationships.

It features strong performances from its lead actors, with Peck delivering a powerful performance as Green, who grapples with his own identity and values in the face of discrimination.

The film was a critical and commercial success, winning three Academy Awards including Best Picture, and remains a classic of Hollywood’s Golden Age.

It is regarded as an important film for its social commentary and the courage it took to address such a sensitive topic at the time.

Gentleman's Agreement
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire, John Garfield (Actors)
  • Elia Kazan (Director) - Elia Kazan (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

3. The Boys from Brazil (1978)

The Boys from Brazil is a 1978 science fiction thriller film directed by Franklin J. Schaffner and starring Gregory Peck and Laurence Olivier.

The film is based on the novel of the same name by Ira Levin and tells the story of a Nazi hunter named Ezra Lieberman who discovers a plot by a former Nazi doctor to clone Hitler and raise the resulting children to be the new leaders of the Fourth Reich.

The Boys from Brazil is known for its suspenseful plot, strong performances, and thought-provoking themes.

The film explores ideas such as nature versus nurture, the legacy of the Third Reich, and the potential dangers of scientific advancement.

It was a commercial success, grossing over $19 million at the box office, and received mixed reviews from critics, with some praising its intelligence and originality while others criticized its implausible plot twists.

The film has since become a cult classic among fans of science fiction and thriller genres, and is notable for its chilling portrayal of the potential consequences of Nazi ideology.

The Boys From Brazil [DVD]
  • Gregory Peck, Laurence Olivier, James Mason (Actors)
  • Franklin J. Schaffner (Director) - Heywood Gould (Writer)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

4. The Guns of Navarone (1961)

“The Guns of Navarone” is a 1961 British-American epic war film directed by J. Lee Thompson and starring Gregory Peck, David Niven, and Anthony Quinn.

The movie tells the story of a group of Allied soldiers tasked with destroying two massive German cannons on the Greek island of Navarone, which are preventing the evacuation of 2,000 British soldiers from a nearby island.

Peck plays the role of Mallory, the leader of the group, which includes explosives expert Miller (Niven) and Greek resistance fighter Andrea (Quinn).

   

As they embark on their mission, the soldiers encounter a number of obstacles and dangers, including treacherous terrain, enemy soldiers, and the ticking clock of an impending German attack.

“The Guns of Navarone” was a critical and commercial success upon its release, and it remains a beloved classic of the war film genre.

The movie is noted for its impressive action sequences, including the climactic assault on the German guns, as well as its strong performances from its ensemble cast.

Peck’s portrayal of the stoic and determined Mallory has been praised for its intensity and gravitas, while Niven’s wry wit and Quinn’s fiery passion add depth and complexity to their respective characters.

The film also explores themes of sacrifice, heroism, and the cost of war, as the soldiers confront their own fears and doubts in the face of overwhelming odds.

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The Guns of Navarone
  • DVD
  • Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Special Edition, Subtitled,...
  • English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 2.0...
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  • 155

5. Spellbound (1945)

Spellbound is a psychological thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released in 1945. The movie stars Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck, and tells the story of a woman who falls in love with a man who may have murdered his own brother.

The film explores themes of identity, memory, and psychoanalysis, and was notable for its innovative use of dream sequences created by artist Salvador Dali.

Spellbound was also one of the first Hollywood films to explore the emerging field of psychoanalysis, and its depictions of the therapeutic process were groundbreaking at the time.

Spellbound was a critical and commercial success, with many praising Hitchcock’s direction, Bergman’s performance, and the film’s exploration of complex psychological issues.

   

The movie won the Academy Award for Best Original Score, and was nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actor for Michael Chekhov’s performance.

Overall, Spellbound is a classic of Hollywood cinema that remains a landmark in the history of psychological thrillers. Its innovative use of dream sequences and its exploration of complex psychological issues make it a work of art that continues to captivate and inspire audiences today.

Spellbound
  • B&W, 111 minutes
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

6. The Gunfighter (1950)

“The Gunfighter” is a Western film released in 1950, directed by Henry King and starring Gregory Peck in the lead role.

The film follows aging gunfighter Jimmy Ringo (Peck) who has gained a reputation as the fastest draw in the West. He is constantly hounded by young up-and-coming gunslingers looking to make a name for themselves by challenging him.

Tired of running and always looking over his shoulder, Ringo decides to try and settle down and start a new life with his estranged wife and son.

However, his past catches up with him and he finds himself once again embroiled in violence, with a posse on his trail and young gunslingers eager to take him down.

“The Gunfighter” was praised for its gritty, realistic portrayal of the Wild West and its examination of the toll that a life of violence can take on a person.

Peck’s performance as the tortured and haunted Jimmy Ringo was also widely acclaimed, and the film has since become a classic of the Western genre.

In addition to Peck, the film also features strong supporting performances from actors such as Millard Mitchell, Karl Malden, and Jean Parker.

The Gunfighter [DVD] [1950]
  • Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German (Subtitles)

7. Twelve O’Clock High (1949)

“Twelve O’Clock High” is a 1949 war drama film directed by Henry King and starring Gregory Peck. The movie is set during World War II and follows the story of a U.S. Army Air Forces unit that is suffering from low morale and high casualties.

Peck plays the role of Brigadier General Frank Savage, a strict and no-nonsense commander who takes over the unit and tries to whip it into shape.

The film is known for its realistic portrayal of the physical and emotional toll of aerial combat, as well as its exploration of leadership and the human cost of war.

Peck delivers a powerful and nuanced performance as General Savage, portraying the character’s toughness and determination as well as his vulnerability and inner turmoil.

The film’s supporting cast includes such notable actors as Dean Jagger, Hugh Marlowe, and Gary Merrill, who provide strong and memorable performances.

The film’s aerial sequences, which were shot using real planes and pilots, are particularly impressive, capturing the intensity and danger of air combat.

Overall, “Twelve O’Clock High” is a classic war drama that remains relevant and thought-provoking today. It is a must-watch for fans of Gregory Peck, World War II films, and anyone interested in the psychological and emotional impact of war on soldiers and leaders.

Twelve O'Clock High
  • Gregory Peck, Hugh Marlowe, Gary Merrill (Actors)
  • Henry King (Director) - Beirne Lay Jr. (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

8. The Big Country (1958)

The Big Country is a 1958 American epic Western film directed by William Wyler and starring Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker, Charlton Heston, and Burl Ives.

The film tells the story of a wealthy Easterner named James McKay (Peck) who travels to the American West to marry his fiancée, Patricia Terrill (Baker), but finds himself caught in the middle of a feud between two ranching families.

As McKay tries to stay out of the conflict, he must confront his own notions of honor and masculinity, as well as his feelings for Terrill and the independent rancher, Julie Maragon (Simmons).

The film explores themes such as honor, masculinity, and the clash of cultures between the East and the West.

The Big Country was notable for its stunning cinematography by Franz Planer, which captured the rugged beauty of the Western landscape, and for its score by Jerome Moross, which became a classic of American film music.

The film also featured powerful performances, particularly by Ives, who won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Rufus Hannassey, the head of one of the ranching families.

The Big Country was a critical and commercial success and helped to redefine the Western genre in Hollywood. The film has since become a classic of American cinema and has been praised for its exploration of complex themes, its beautiful visuals, and its powerful performances.

The Big Country
  • The Big Country - DVD Brand New
  • Gregory Peck, Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker (Actors)
  • William Wyler (Director) - Donald Hamilton (Writer)
  • Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

9. The Keys of the Kingdom (1944)

“The Keys of the Kingdom” is an American drama film released in 1944, directed by John M. Stahl and starring Gregory Peck, Thomas Mitchell, and Vincent Price.

The film tells the story of a Scottish priest named Father Francis Chisholm who is sent to China to convert the locals to Christianity.

The film is notable for its exploration of faith, cultural differences, and the challenges faced by missionaries in foreign lands.

It features a strong performance from Peck as Father Chisholm, who struggles with doubts and personal demons as he tries to fulfill his mission.

The film was a critical and commercial success, receiving four Academy Award nominations including Best Actor for Peck. It is regarded as a classic of Hollywood’s Golden Age, and a significant film for its portrayal of religion and the power of faith in trying times.

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The Keys of the Kingdom
  • The Keys of the Kingdom - DVD Brand New
  • Gregory Peck, Thomas Mitchell, Vincent Price (Actors)
  • John M. Stahl (Director) - A.J. Cronin (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

10. Moby Dick (1956)

Moby Dick is a 1956 adventure drama film directed by John Huston and starring Gregory Peck, Richard Basehart, and Leo Genn.

The film is based on the novel of the same name by Herman Melville and tells the story of Captain Ahab’s obsessive pursuit of the legendary white whale that had previously destroyed his ship and bitten off his leg.

The film features stunning cinematography and a haunting musical score by Philip Sainton.

Moby Dick is known for its powerful performances, epic scale, and literary adaptation. The film explores themes such as obsession, revenge, and man’s struggle against the forces of nature, while also providing a thrilling and dramatic viewing experience.

It received mixed reviews upon its release, with some praising its faithfulness to the source material and others criticizing its slow pace and lack of action.

However, it has since become a cult classic among fans of adventure films and literature adaptations, and is considered a landmark entry in the filmography of both John Huston and Gregory Peck.

Moby Dick (1956)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Gregory Peck, Richard Basehart, Leo Genn (Actors)
  • John Huston (Director) - Ray Bradbury (Writer) - Lehman Katz (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

11. Roman Holiday (1953)

“Roman Holiday” is a 1953 American romantic comedy film directed by William Wyler and starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck.

The movie tells the story of a young European princess named Ann (Hepburn) who, while on a state visit to Rome, escapes from her handlers and embarks on a whirlwind adventure with American journalist Joe Bradley (Peck).

As Ann and Joe tour the city, they fall in love and experience the joys and challenges of living in the moment.

However, their idyllic romance is complicated by the fact that Joe is secretly planning to write a story about his encounters with the princess, which could jeopardize her diplomatic mission and lead to his own career advancement.

“Roman Holiday” was a critical and commercial success upon its release, and it has since become a beloved classic of the romantic comedy genre. The film is noted for its charming performances from Hepburn and Peck, as well as its stunning location photography of Rome.

Hepburn won an Academy Award for her portrayal of Ann, cementing her status as a Hollywood icon, while Peck’s performance as the witty and charming Joe has been praised for its warmth and sincerity.

The movie also explores themes of duty, sacrifice, and the transformative power of love, as Ann and Joe are forced to confront the consequences of their choices and the uncertain future that lies ahead.

Roman Holiday
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck (Actors)
  • William Wyler (Director) - Ian M. Hunter (Writer) - William Wyler (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

12. The Paradine Case (1947)

The Paradine Case is a courtroom drama film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and released in 1947. The movie stars Gregory Peck, Alida Valli, and Charles Laughton, and tells the story of a lawyer who falls in love with his client, a woman accused of poisoning her wealthy husband.

The film explores themes of guilt, desire, and the complexities of relationships. The movie was notable for its lush cinematography and its intense psychological drama, which was a departure from Hitchcock’s more suspenseful thrillers.

The Paradine Case received mixed reviews upon its release, with some critics praising its visual style and performances, while others criticized its slow pace and lack of tension.

However, the film has gained a following over the years, with many appreciating its subtle exploration of complex emotional issues.

Overall, The Paradine Case is a sophisticated and nuanced work of Hollywood cinema that remains a fascinating study of human nature. Its exploration of complex relationships and its intense psychological drama make it a film that is both entertaining and thought-provoking.

The Paradine Case
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

13. Mirage (1965)

“Mirage” is a mystery thriller film released in 1965, directed by Edward Dmytryk and starring Gregory Peck, Diane Baker, and Walter Matthau.

The film follows David Stillwell (Peck), an amnesiac who wakes up in a New York City office building with no memory of who he is or how he got there.

He soon realizes that he is being pursued by mysterious men who want to kill him, and he teams up with a young woman named Shela (Baker) to try and uncover his past and unravel the conspiracy that threatens his life.

As David delves deeper into his past, he discovers that he was involved in a shady business deal that may have resulted in the deaths of several people.

With the help of Shela and a private investigator named Ted Caselle (Matthau), David races against time to unravel the truth before it’s too late.

“Mirage” was praised for its suspenseful plot, intricate twists and turns, and strong performances from its cast.

Peck was particularly praised for his portrayal of David Stillwell, a complex and morally ambiguous character who must confront the dark secrets of his past. The film also featured a memorable score by composer Quincy Jones.

Overall, “Mirage” remains a classic of the mystery-thriller genre, and is regarded as one of the best films of Gregory Peck’s career.

Mirage
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gregory Peck, Walter Matthau, Kevin McCarthy (Actors)
  • Edward Dmytryk (Director)
  • Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

14. MacArthur (1977)

“MacArthur” is a 1977 biographical film directed by Joseph Sargent and starring Gregory Peck in the title role. The film tells the story of General Douglas MacArthur, a legendary military leader who played a significant role in American history.

The film covers MacArthur’s life from his childhood to his military career, including his service in World War I and World War II, as well as his role in the Korean War.

Peck delivers a powerful and charismatic performance as MacArthur, capturing the character’s larger-than-life persona and his strategic genius.

The film also features a strong supporting cast, including Ed Flanders as President Truman, Dan O’Herlihy as General Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Marj Dusay as MacArthur’s wife Jean.

The film’s sweeping score and impressive production values add to its epic feel and historical accuracy.

Overall, “MacArthur” is a compelling biographical drama that offers a fascinating look into the life and career of one of America’s most famous military leaders.

Gregory Peck’s performance as MacArthur is a standout, and the film is a must-watch for fans of historical dramas and military history.

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MacArthur
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gregory Peck, Ed Flanders, Dan O'Herlihy (Actors)
  • Joseph Sargent (Director) - Hal Barwood (Writer) - Frank McCarthy (Producer)
  • French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

15. Cape Fear (1962)

Cape Fear is a 1962 psychological thriller film directed by J. Lee Thompson and starring Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum, and Polly Bergen.

The film is based on the novel The Executioners by John D. MacDonald and tells the story of a lawyer named Sam Bowden (Peck) whose family is terrorized by a vengeful ex-convict named Max Cady (Mitchum).

Cady blames Bowden for his imprisonment and sets out to destroy his life and reputation, leading to a tense and violent confrontation between the two men.

The film explores themes such as revenge, justice, and the nature of evil. Cape Fear was notable for its powerful performances, particularly by Mitchum, who was praised for his chilling portrayal of the menacing and manipulative Cady.

The film also featured a haunting score by Bernard Herrmann, which added to its tension and atmosphere.

Cape Fear was a critical and commercial success and helped to establish Mitchum as one of Hollywood’s most iconic villains. The film has since become a classic of American cinema and has been remade several times, including a 1991 version directed by Martin Scorsese.

The original film is often praised for its psychological complexity, its exploration of dark themes, and its intense and suspenseful narrative.

Cape Fear (1962)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum, Polly Bergen (Actors)
  • J. Lee Thompson (Director) - James R. Webb (Writer) - Sy Bartlett (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

16. Yellow Sky (1948)

“Yellow Sky” is an American western film released in 1948, directed by William A. Wellman and starring Gregory Peck, Anne Baxter, and Richard Widmark.

The film tells the story of a gang of bank robbers who seek refuge in a ghost town in the middle of the desert, only to discover that it is inhabited by a small group of prospectors, led by a tough-minded woman named Mike.

The film is notable for its exploration of themes such as greed, redemption, and the clash of civilizations in the American West.

It features strong performances from its lead actors, with Peck delivering a nuanced performance as the conflicted leader of the gang, and Baxter and Widmark adding depth and complexity to their respective roles as Mike and the gang member who becomes her ally.

The film was a critical and commercial success, praised for its stunning cinematography and memorable characters. It is regarded as a classic of the western genre and a significant film for its portrayal of moral ambiguity and human nature.

Yellow Sky
  • Gregory Peck, Anne Baxter, Richard Widmark (Actors)
  • William Wellman (Director) - Lamar Trotti (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

17. The Yearling (1946)

The Yearling is a 1946 family drama film directed by Clarence Brown and starring Gregory Peck, Jane Wyman, and Claude Jarman Jr.

The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and tells the story of a young boy named Jody who adopts an orphaned fawn and develops a close bond with it.

However, as the fawn grows older, it begins to cause damage to the family’s crops and Jody must make a difficult decision about its future.

The Yearling is known for its emotional story, stunning visuals, and strong performances. The film explores themes such as coming of age, family dynamics, and the connection between humans and nature.

It was a commercial and critical success, grossing over $8 million at the box office and receiving several Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture.

The film has since become a beloved classic of the family drama genre and is notable for its beautiful Technicolor cinematography and heartwarming portrayal of the bond between a boy and his animal companio.

The Yearling (1946)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Gregory Peck, Jane Wyman, Claude Jarman, Jr. (Actors)
  • Clarence Brown (Director) - Paul Osborn (Writer) - Sidney Franklin (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

18. On the Beach (1959)

“On the Beach” is a 1959 American post-apocalyptic drama film directed by Stanley Kramer and starring Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner, and Fred Astaire.

The movie is based on the novel of the same name by Nevil Shute, and tells the story of a group of people in Australia who are awaiting the arrival of deadly radiation cloud following a nuclear war that has wiped out most of humanity.

Peck plays the role of Commander Dwight Towers, a submarine captain who is sent to Australia to make contact with any survivors and report back to his superiors in the United States.

Along the way, he meets and falls in love with Moira (Gardner), a young woman struggling to come to terms with the imminent end of the world. Astaire plays the role of Julian, a scientist who is trying to find a way to save humanity from extinction.

“On the Beach” was a critical and commercial success upon its release, and it remains a powerful and thought-provoking exploration of the potential consequences of nuclear war.

The film is noted for its strong performances from its cast, particularly Peck’s portrayal of the stoic and duty-bound Towers, as well as its harrowing depiction of a world on the brink of annihilation.

The movie also explores themes of morality, despair, and the resilience of the human spirit, as the characters confront the ultimate existential crisis and face the prospect of their own extinction.

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19. Night People (1954)

Night People is a Cold War thriller film directed by Nunnally Johnson and released in 1954. The movie stars Gregory Peck as an American Army colonel stationed in post-World War II Berlin, who becomes embroiled in a dangerous spy game involving the Soviet Union.

The film explores themes of espionage, loyalty, and betrayal, and was notable for its tense atmosphere and suspenseful plot. Night People was also praised for its realistic portrayal of the political tensions of the Cold War era, as well as its attention to historical detail.

Night People was a critical and commercial success, with many praising Peck’s performance and the film’s tight script and thrilling plot. The movie was also notable for its innovative use of location shooting, with much of the film being filmed on location in Berlin.

Overall, Night People is a gripping and intense thriller that remains a classic of Hollywood’s Cold War era.

Its exploration of complex political issues and its tense atmosphere make it a film that is both entertaining and thought-provoking, and its legacy continues to inspire filmmakers today.

Night People
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Gregory Peck, Broderick Crawford, Anita Björk (Actors)
  • Nunnally Johnson (Director) - Nunnally Johnson (Writer) - Nunnally Johnson (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

20. How the West Was Won (1962)

“How the West Was Won” is an epic Western film released in 1962, directed by John Ford, Henry Hathaway, and George Marshall, and starring an ensemble cast including James Stewart, John Wayne, Henry Fonda, Gregory Peck, Debbie Reynolds, and many others.

The film tells the story of several generations of a family as they make their way across the American West, facing numerous trials and tribulations along the way.

The film is divided into five parts, each directed by a different filmmaker, and showcases a variety of Western landscapes, from the rugged mountains and forests of the east to the wide open plains and deserts of the west.

The film features a number of iconic scenes and set-pieces, including a riverboat race, a buffalo stampede, and a train robbery.

The cast, which also includes Richard Widmark, Karl Malden, and Eli Wallach, among others, deliver strong performances throughout, bringing their characters to life in a way that helps to illustrate the diverse experiences of the American West.

“How the West Was Won” was praised for its stunning cinematography, its epic scope and scale, and its ability to capture the spirit of the American West in all its diversity and complexity.

The film was a commercial and critical success, winning three Academy Awards and becoming one of the most beloved Western films of all time.

How The West Was Won [DVD] [1962]
  • English, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Norwegian (Subtitles)

21. Arabesque (1966)

“Arabesque” is a 1966 mystery thriller directed by Stanley Donen and starring Gregory Peck and Sophia Loren. The film follows David Pollock (Peck), a professor of hieroglyphics who is approached by a Middle Eastern oil magnate to decipher a hieroglyphic message.

However, Pollock soon finds himself caught up in a dangerous game of international espionage, with his life in danger at every turn.

Peck delivers a solid performance as the intelligent and resourceful Pollock, while Loren shines as Yasmin Azir, a beautiful and mysterious woman who becomes his unlikely ally.

The film features a complex and engaging plot, with plenty of twists and turns to keep the audience guessing.

“Arabesque” is also notable for its stylish and visually stunning cinematography, which features bold and vibrant colors, intricate set designs, and impressive action sequences.

The film’s score, composed by Henry Mancini, is also a standout, adding to the film’s overall sense of tension and intrigue.

Overall, “Arabesque” is a well-crafted and entertaining thriller that showcases the talents of its lead actors and the director’s stylish visual sensibility. It is a must-watch for fans of classic mystery and suspense films.

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Arabesque [DVD]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gregory Peck, Sophia Loren (Actors)
  • Stanley Donen (Director)
  • French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

22. The Omen (1976)

The Omen is a 1976 horror film directed by Richard Donner and starring Gregory Peck, Lee Remick, and Harvey Stephens.

The film tells the story of an American ambassador named Robert Thorn (Peck) who begins to suspect that his son, Damien (Stephens), is not the innocent child he appears to be.

As strange and deadly events occur around the boy, Thorn uncovers a dark conspiracy involving the supernatural and his son’s true identity.

The film explores themes such as evil, fate, and religion.

The Omen was notable for its atmospheric visuals and powerful performances, particularly by Peck, who brought depth and gravitas to his role as the troubled ambassador.

The film also featured a haunting score by Jerry Goldsmith, which added to its eerie and ominous atmosphere.

The Omen was a commercial success and spawned several sequels and spin-offs. The film has since become a classic of horror cinema and is often praised for its effective storytelling, its chilling visuals, and its exploration of complex themes.

The Omen
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Gregory Peck, Lee Remick, David Warner (Actors)
  • Richard Donner (Director) - David Seltzer (Writer) - Harvey Bernhard (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

23. Marooned (1969)

“Marooned” is an American science fiction film released in 1969, directed by John Sturges and starring Gregory Peck, Richard Crenna, and David Janssen.

The film tells the story of three astronauts who are stranded in space after their spacecraft malfunctions, and the efforts of ground control to rescue them.

The film is notable for its exploration of the human experience of space travel and the psychological effects of isolation and uncertainty.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEpHyC72gss&pp=ygUYTWFyb29uZWQgKDE5NjkpIHRyYWlsZXIg

It features strong performances from its lead actors, with Peck delivering a powerful performance as the veteran astronaut who must confront his mortality and face the consequences of his decisions.

The film was a critical and commercial success, praised for its realistic portrayal of space travel and the suspenseful plot. It won an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects and was nominated for two other Oscars.

It is regarded as a classic of the science fiction genre and a significant film for its exploration of the human psyche in extreme conditions.

Marooned
  • Marooned (Imprint)
  • Marooned (Imprint)
  • Gregory Peck, Richard Crenna, David Janssen (Actors)
  • John Sturges (Director) - Mike J. Frankovich (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

24. Old Gringo (1989)

Old Gringo is a 1989 American adventure drama film directed by Luis Puenzo and starring Gregory Peck, Jane Fonda, and Jimmy Smits.

The film is based on the novel “Gringo Viejo” by Carlos Fuentes and tells the story of an aging American journalist named Ambrose Bierce who travels to Mexico during the Mexican Revolution and becomes embroiled in the conflict.

He forms a complicated relationship with a wealthy American woman and a Mexican revolutionary leader, and struggles to reconcile his ideals with the harsh realities of war.

Old Gringo is known for its powerful performances, beautiful cinematography, and complex themes. The film explores ideas such as imperialism, cultural identity, and the intersection of politics and personal morality.

It received mixed reviews from critics upon its release, with some praising its ambition and performances while others criticized its uneven pacing and melodramatic tone.

However, it has since gained a cult following among fans of historical dramas and is notable for its nuanced portrayal of the Mexican Revolution and its impact on both Mexican and American societies.

Old Gringo [DVD]
  • Jane Fonda, Gregory Peck, Jim Metzler (Actors)
  • Luis Puenzo (Director) - Lois Bonfiglio (Producer)
  • English, Spanish, French, Georgian (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

25. Mackenna’s Gold (1969)

“Mackenna’s Gold” is a 1969 American western film directed by J. Lee Thompson and starring an ensemble cast that includes Gregory Peck, Omar Sharif, Telly Savalas, and Julie Newmar.

The movie tells the story of a group of adventurers who set out to find a legendary canyon filled with gold in the American Southwest.

Peck plays the role of Sheriff Mackenna, who is forced to lead the group of treasure seekers after they threaten to kill him if he does not reveal the location of the gold.

Along the way, Mackenna and his companions encounter a series of challenges, including treacherous terrain, hostile Native American tribes, and a ruthless outlaw named Colorado (Savalas), who is also searching for the gold.

“Mackenna’s Gold” was a box office success upon its release, but it received mixed reviews from critics, who criticized its uneven pacing and lack of depth in the characters.

However, the movie remains notable for its star-studded cast and its thrilling action sequences, which include epic shootouts and daring stunts.

The film also explores themes of greed, betrayal, and redemption, as the characters confront their own motivations and desires in their quest for wealth and power.

MacKenna's Gold
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gregory Peck, Omar Sharif, Telly Savalas (Actors)
  • J. Lee Thompson (Director) - Dimitri Tiomkin (Producer)
  • English, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Thai (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

3 Reasons To Watch Gregory Peck Movies

Iconic performances: Gregory Peck was one of the most respected actors of Hollywood’s Golden Age, known for his commanding presence and his ability to embody complex characters.

He starred in many classic films, such as “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Roman Holiday,” and “The Guns of Navarone,” which earned him numerous awards and nominations.

Social relevance: Many of Gregory Peck’s movies dealt with important social and political issues of their time, such as racism, war, and injustice.

His performances in films like “Gentleman’s Agreement” and “To Kill a Mockingbird” were particularly notable for their groundbreaking depictions of complex social issues, and helped to raise awareness and promote change in society.

Timeless themes: Gregory Peck’s movies often dealt with timeless themes such as love, honor, and courage.

His performances in films like “Roman Holiday” and “The Big Country” were especially notable for their portrayal of complex characters struggling to find their place in the world, and his work continues to resonate with audiences today.

Best Gregory Peck Movies – Wrap Up

Gregory Peck was one of the most iconic actors of the 20th century, known for his commanding presence, nuanced performances, and ability to bring complex characters to life on the screen. Here are some of his most notable films:

“To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962) – Peck won an Academy Award for his portrayal of Atticus Finch, a small-town lawyer who defends a black man accused of rape in the racially charged South of the 1930s.

“Roman Holiday” (1953) – In this romantic comedy, Peck stars opposite Audrey Hepburn as a journalist who falls in love with a princess on a visit to Rome.

“The Guns of Navarone” (1961) – Peck leads a team of Allied commandos on a mission to destroy massive German guns on a Greek island during World War II.

“The Omen” (1976) – Peck plays an American diplomat who discovers that his adopted son may be the Antichrist in this horror classic.

“Twelve O’Clock High” (1949) – Peck plays a tough but fair military leader who takes over a demoralized bomber unit during World War II.

“The Boys from Brazil” (1978) – Peck stars as a Nazi hunter who uncovers a sinister plot to clone Hitler in this thriller.

“The Big Country” (1958) – Peck plays a former sea captain who tries to make a new life for himself on the Western frontier.

“Captain Horatio Hornblower” (1951) – Peck plays a British naval captain in this swashbuckling adventure set during the Napoleonic Wars.

Overall, Gregory Peck’s career spanned more than four decades, and he left behind a rich legacy of memorable performances and iconic films.