Shelley Winters was an American actress who had a prolific career spanning several decades in film, television, and stage.

She won two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress, for her roles in “The Diary of Anne Frank” (1959) and “A Patch of Blue” (1965), and was known for her dynamic and versatile performances.

Winters appeared in over 100 films throughout her career, and worked with some of the most acclaimed directors of her time.

She was known for her ability to embody a wide range of characters, from dramatic and emotional roles to comedic and quirky parts.

Some of Shelley Winters’ most notable movies include “A Place in the Sun” (1951), “The Night of the Hunter” (1955), “Lolita” (1962), “Alfie” (1966), and “The Poseidon Adventure” (1972).

Best Shelley Winters Movies

Her performances in these films showcase her talent and versatility as an actress, and cement her status as a Hollywood icon.

1. A Place in the Sun (1951)

“A Place in the Sun” is a 1951 drama film directed by George Stevens and based on the novel “An American Tragedy” by Theodore Dreiser. The film stars Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, and Shelley Winters.

The story follows George Eastman (Clift), a poor and ambitious young man who takes a job at his wealthy uncle’s factory. While there, he falls in love with a beautiful socialite named Angela (Taylor) but is also involved with a co-worker named Alice (Winters).

As George tries to navigate these complicated relationships, he becomes increasingly desperate to climb the social ladder and achieve his dreams.

“A Place in the Sun” was critically acclaimed upon its release and was nominated for nine Academy Awards, winning six, including Best Director for Stevens.

The film is known for its powerful performances, stunning cinematography, and poignant portrayal of the American dream and its dark side.

A Place in the Sun
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, Shelley Winters (Actors)
  • George Stevens (Director) - Harry Brown (Writer) - George Stevens (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

2. A Patch of Blue (1965)

“A Patch of Blue” is a drama film released in 1965. Directed by Guy Green, the movie stars Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters, and Elizabeth Hartman.

The story revolves around Selina D’Arcey (played by Elizabeth Hartman), a young blind woman living in a rundown neighborhood with her abusive and bigoted mother Rose-Ann (played by Shelley Winters).

   

Selina’s life takes a turn when she meets Gordon Ralfe (played by Sidney Poitier), a compassionate and kind-hearted man who befriends her.

Despite societal prejudices and Rose-Ann’s disapproval, Selina and Gordon form a deep bond and develop a tender romantic relationship. Their connection transcends their differences and challenges the prejudice and discrimination they face. 

“A Patch of Blue” explores themes of love, compassion, and the power of human connection. It addresses issues of racial and social inequality and highlights the importance of empathy and understanding.

The film is praised for its sensitive portrayal of the relationship between Selina and Gordon, as well as for the performances of its cast.

Elizabeth Hartman received critical acclaim for her breakthrough performance as Selina, earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress.

“A Patch of Blue” received positive reviews for its thought-provoking story, emotional depth, and powerful performances. It stands as an impactful film that addresses important social issues and promotes empathy and acceptance in the face of adversity.

A Patch of Blue [DVD]
  • Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters, Elizabeth Hartman (Actors)
  • Guy Green (Director)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

3. A Double Life (1947)

“A Double Life” is a film noir released in 1947, directed by George Cukor and starring Ronald Colman in the lead role. The film follows the story of a respected Shakespearean actor named Anthony John who becomes obsessed with the characters he portrays and begins to lose touch with reality.

One reason to watch “A Double Life” is for Ronald Colman’s outstanding performance. He received an Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Anthony John, and it is easy to see why.

   

Colman’s performance is nuanced and complex, capturing both the charm and vulnerability of his character, as well as his descent into madness.

Another reason to watch “A Double Life” is for its suspenseful and atmospheric storytelling. The film creates a dark and moody world of shadows and secrets, where the line between reality and fiction is blurred.

The tension builds slowly but steadily, as the audience is drawn deeper into Anthony John’s unraveling mind.

Finally, “A Double Life” is a thought-provoking exploration of the nature of identity and the power of the creative imagination.

The film raises important questions about the role of the artist in society and the relationship between art and life, as Anthony John grapples with the demons that haunt him both on and off stage.

Overall, “A Double Life” is a classic film noir that is well worth watching for its outstanding performances, suspenseful storytelling, and thought-provoking themes. It is a haunting and powerful film that continues to resonate with audiences today.

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A Double Life
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Ronald Colman, Signe Hasso, Edmond O'Brien (Actors)
  • George Cukor (Director) - Ruth Gordon (Writer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

4. Winchester ’73 (1950)

“Winchester ’73” is a 1950 Western film directed by Anthony Mann. While Lauren Bacall is not part of the cast of “Winchester ’73,” the film features James Stewart in the lead role, delivering a captivating performance as Lin McAdam, a cowboy on a quest for revenge.

“Winchester ’73” follows the story of Lin McAdam as he pursues his stolen Winchester rifle across the Western frontier.

Along the way, he encounters various characters, including his rival, Dutch Henry Brown (played by Stephen McNally), and a sympathetic stranger named High-Spade (played by Millard Mitchell).

The film is known for its gripping storyline, strong performances, and its exploration of themes such as vengeance, honor, and redemption.

Here are a few reasons to watch “Winchester ’73”:

James Stewart’s Performance: James Stewart is exceptional in his portrayal of Lin McAdam. His commanding presence and ability to convey complex emotions make him a compelling protagonist. Stewart’s performance adds depth and intensity to the film, showcasing his talent as an actor. 

   

Tightly Woven Storyline: “Winchester ’73” offers a tightly woven and suspenseful storyline that keeps viewers engaged from start to finish. As Lin McAdam pursues his stolen rifle, the film unfolds with a series of encounters and confrontations that build tension and drama.

The narrative keeps audiences guessing and provides satisfying payoffs along the way.

Cinematic Excellence: Directed by Anthony Mann, “Winchester ’73” showcases skilled craftsmanship and technical expertise. The film boasts stunning cinematography, capturing the sweeping landscapes of the Western frontier.

It also features tight editing, well-choreographed action sequences, and a memorable musical score, enhancing the overall viewing experience.

“Winchester ’73” is a classic Western film that exemplifies the genre’s storytelling prowess and showcases the talents of James Stewart.

While Lauren Bacall is not involved in this particular film, fans of Westerns will appreciate its gripping storyline, strong performances, and cinematic excellence.

It remains a notable entry in the genre’s canon and is worth watching for those who enjoy compelling tales set in the rugged Wild West.

Winchester '73
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • James Stewart, Shelley Winters, Dan Duryea (Actors)
  • Anthony Mann (Director) - Robert L. Richards (Writer) - Aaron Rosenberg (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

5. The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)

“The Diary of Anne Frank” is a historical drama film released in 1959. Directed by George Stevens, the movie is based on the diary kept by Anne Frank.

A Jewish girl who went into hiding with her family during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in World War II. While Ellen Barkin does not appear in the film, I can provide information about it.

“The Diary of Anne Frank” tells the poignant and heartbreaking story of Anne Frank, played by Millie Perkins, as she and her family hide in a secret annex in Amsterdam to escape persecution.

The film follows their experiences, fears, and hopes as they live in confinement for over two years, all while Anne chronicles her thoughts and emotions in her diary.

The movie captures the universal themes of resilience, hope, and the human spirit’s triumph over adversity. It explores the impact of war on innocent lives, the importance of human connections, and the power of Anne’s words as a testament to the horrors of the Holocaust.

“The Diary of Anne Frank” received critical acclaim upon its release and won three Academy Awards, including Best Supporting Actress for Shelley Winters, who portrayed Mrs. Van Daan, another occupant of the secret annex.

The film is known for its powerful performances, sensitive direction, and its faithful adaptation of Anne Frank’s diary.

By watching “The Diary of Anne Frank,” viewers gain a deeper understanding of one of the most significant and tragic events in history. The film serves as a reminder of the importance of compassion, tolerance, and the preservation of memory.

While Ellen Barkin does not feature in the film, “The Diary of Anne Frank” remains a highly regarded and impactful work that honors the legacy of Anne Frank and her remarkable diary.

The Diary of Anne Frank
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Millie Perkins, Diane Baker, Shelley Winters (Actors)
  • George Stevens (Director) - George Stevens (Writer) - George Stevens (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

6. The Night of the Hunter (1955)

“The Night of the Hunter” (1955). The film is a classic thriller directed by Charles Laughton and stars Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, and Lillian Gish. It tells the story of a corrupt preacher who marries a widow in order to find out where her late husband hid stolen money.

While Ellen Barkin has had a remarkable career, “The Night of the Hunter” is not among her film credits. However, if you have any other questions or if there’s another topic you’d like to explore, please let me know.

The Night of the Hunter [DVD]
  • Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, Billy Chapin (Actors)
  • Charles Laughton (Director)
  • English, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

7. Lolita (1962)

“Lolita” is a 1962 drama film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Vladimir Nabokov. The movie stars James Mason as the middle-aged Humbert Humbert, who becomes obsessed with his young stepdaughter, Lolita, played by Sue Lyon.

The film explores the taboo and controversial subject matter of a man’s sexual desire for a young girl, and the destructive consequences of their relationship.

Shelley Winters plays the role of Charlotte Haze, Lolita’s mother and Humbert’s landlady. Her character is a delusional and desperate woman who becomes infatuated with Humbert and dreams of marrying him, unaware of his true intentions towards her daughter.

Winters delivers a nuanced and complex performance, portraying Charlotte as both comical and pitiful, and adding a layer of depth to the film’s exploration of sexuality and power dynamics.

“Lolita” was a critical success upon its release, but also sparked controversy and backlash due to its subject matter. The film has since become regarded as a classic of 1960s cinema, known for its bold and daring approach to a taboo topic.

As well as its stylish direction and strong performances. Shelley Winters’ portrayal of Charlotte Haze is a standout in the film, and showcases her talent and versatility as an actress.

Lolita (1962)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • James Mason, Shelley Winters, Peter Sellers (Actors)
  • Stanley Kubrick (Director) - Vladimir Nabakov (Writer) - James B. Harris (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

8. The Poseidon Adventure (1972)

“The Poseidon Adventure” is a 1972 American disaster film directed by Ronald Neame and starring Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Shelley Winters, and others. The film is based on a novel by Paul Gallico and follows a group of passengers on the ocean liner SS Poseidon as they struggle to survive after the ship capsizes on New Year’s Eve.

The story revolves around a small group of survivors led by Reverend Frank Scott (Hackman) who attempt to escape from the upside-down ship before it sinks completely.

The group must navigate through a series of obstacles, including flooded corridors, fires, and other dangers, as they make their way to the ship’s hull, where they hope to be rescued.

“The Poseidon Adventure” was a critical and commercial success upon its release, grossing over $125 million worldwide and winning an Academy Award for Best Original Song (“The Morning After” by Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn).

The film is known for its impressive special effects, suspenseful storyline, and memorable performances by its ensemble cast.

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The Poseidon Adventure [DVD]
  • The Poseidon Adventure - DVD Brand New
  • Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Shelley Winters (Actors)
  • Irwin Allen (Director) - Paul Gallico (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

9. Alfie (1966)

“Alfie” is a British romantic comedy-drama film released in 1966. Directed by Lewis Gilbert, the movie stars Michael Caine in the titular role, supported by Shelley Winters, Millicent Martin, and Vivien Merchant.

The story centers around Alfie Elkins, a charming and womanizing Cockney womanizer who lives a carefree and self-indulgent life in London.

Alfie narrates his encounters with various women and his casual approach to relationships, showcasing his disregard for commitment and the consequences of his actions.

As the film progresses, Alfie’s cavalier attitude towards love and responsibility begins to catch up with him. He faces the repercussions of his behavior and is forced to confront the emptiness and shallowness of his lifestyle.

“Alfie” explores themes of love, sexuality, masculinity, and the complexities of human relationships. It offers a character study of Alfie as he grapples with his own shortcomings and evolves through his experiences.

The film is known for its innovative narrative style, breaking the fourth wall as Alfie directly addresses the audience, providing insight into his thoughts and perspectives.

This technique adds a unique layer to the storytelling, allowing the audience to engage with Alfie’s charismatic yet flawed persona.

Michael Caine’s performance as Alfie received widespread critical acclaim and established him as a leading actor. The film garnered several accolades, including Academy Award nominations for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress.

“Alfie” is regarded as a significant film of the 1960s British New Wave movement and is often cited as one of Michael Caine’s most memorable roles.

It offers a thought-provoking examination of love, relationships, and personal growth, showcasing the complexities of human nature.

Alfie
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Michael Caine, Shelley Winters, Millicent Martin (Actors)
  • Lewis Gilbert (Director) - Bill Naughton (Writer) - Lewis Gilbert (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

   

10. Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)

“Next Stop, Greenwich Village” is a comedy-drama film released in 1976, directed by Paul Mazursky and starring Lenny Baker, Shelley Winters, and Christopher Walken.

The film is loosely based on Mazursky’s own experiences as a struggling young actor in New York City during the 1950s and follows the story of Larry Lapinsky, a young aspiring actor who moves to Greenwich Village to pursue his dreams.

One reason to watch “Next Stop, Greenwich Village” is for its realistic portrayal of the New York City theater scene in the 1950s. The film captures the gritty charm and energy of the era, as well as the struggles and sacrifices of young artists trying to make it in the city.

Another reason to watch “Next Stop, Greenwich Village” is for its strong ensemble cast. Lenny Baker delivers a standout performance as Larry, imbuing the character with a sense of vulnerability and determination that is both endearing and relatable.

Shelley Winters also shines as Larry’s overbearing mother, while Christopher Walken steals scenes as a quirky, unpredictable neighbor.

Finally, “Next Stop, Greenwich Village” is a poignant and funny coming-of-age story that explores universal themes of love, loss, and the pursuit of one’s dreams.

The film is both heartfelt and humorous, offering a nostalgic glimpse into a bygone era and the timeless struggles of youth.

Overall, “Next Stop, Greenwich Village” is a well-crafted and entertaining film that is well worth watching.

 Its strong performances, realistic portrayal of the New York City theater scene, and poignant storytelling make it a standout comedy-drama that continues to resonate with audiences today.

Next Stop, Greenwich Village
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Lenny Baker, Shelley Winters, Ellen Greene (Actors)
  • Paul Mazursky (Director) - Paul Mazursky (Writer)
  • English, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • English (Publication Language)

11. Bloody Mama (1970)

“Bloody Mama” is a 1970 crime drama film directed by Roger Corman. While Lauren Bacall is not part of the cast of “Bloody Mama,” the film features Shelley Winters in the lead role, delivering.

A powerful performance as Kate “Ma” Barker, the matriarch of a criminal family during the Great Depression.

“Bloody Mama” is loosely based on the real-life story of Ma Barker and her gang, who were infamous for their violent crimes. The film explores their criminal activities, their dysfunctional family dynamics, and the volatile relationship between Ma Barker and her sons.

Here are a few aspects of “Bloody Mama” that make it noteworthy:

Shelley Winters’ Performance: Shelley Winters shines in her portrayal of Ma Barker. She brings a mix of toughness, manipulative charm, and maternal instinct to the character, capturing the complexity of Ma Barker’s personality.

Winters’ performance is intense and memorable, anchoring the film and showcasing her versatility as an actress.

Dark and Gritty Atmosphere: “Bloody Mama” is known for its dark and gritty atmosphere, reflecting the bleakness and desperation of the Great Depression era.

The film incorporates elements of crime, violence, and psychological tension, immersing viewers in the world of the Barker gang and their criminal exploits.

Exploration of Familial Bonds: While centered on criminal activities, “Bloody Mama” also delves into the complex dynamics within the Barker family.

It examines the relationships between Ma Barker and her sons, exploring themes of loyalty, power, and the influence of parental figures on their children’s lives.

“Bloody Mama” offers a raw and intense depiction of a criminal family, fueled by Shelley Winters’ commanding performance and the film’s dark atmosphere.

While Lauren Bacall is not involved in this particular film, fans of crime dramas and character studies will find elements to appreciate in “Bloody Mama.” It showcases the talent of Shelley Winters and provides a glimpse into the turbulent world of Ma Barker and her gang.

Alfie
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Michael Caine, Shelley Winters, Millicent Martin (Actors)
  • Lewis Gilbert (Director) - Bill Naughton (Writer) - Lewis Gilbert (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

12. Take One False Step (1949)

“Take One False Step” is a film noir crime thriller released in 1949. Directed by Chester Erskine, the movie stars William Powell and Shelley Winters. While Ellen Barkin does not appear in the film, I can provide information about it.

In “Take One False Step,” William Powell plays Professor Andrew Gentling, a seemingly mild-mannered college professor.

However, his life takes a dark turn when he becomes entangled with a mysterious woman named Bonnie (played by Shelley Winters) and her criminal ex-boyfriend, who are on the run from the law.

As Professor Gentling gets drawn deeper into Bonnie’s dangerous world, he finds himself caught in a web of deceit, violence, and murder. The film follows his journey as he tries to navigate the treacherous circumstances and evade the law while also protecting himself and those he cares about.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VFYmwdXwIDU&pp=ygUiVGFrZSBPbmUgRmFsc2UgU3RlcCAoMTk0OSl0cmFpbGVyIA%3D%3D

“Take One False Step” is a classic example of film noir, characterized by its atmospheric visuals, morally ambiguous characters, and a narrative filled with suspense and unexpected twists. It explores themes of deception, fate, and the consequences of making wrong choices.

While the film may not be as widely known as some other film noir classics, it offers a compelling story with strong performances from its lead actors.

William Powell brings his signature charm and wit to the role of Professor Gentling, while Shelley Winters delivers a captivating performance as the enigmatic Bonnie.

“Take One False Step” is worth watching for fans of classic film noir who appreciate atmospheric crime thrillers with intriguing characters and a plot that keeps them guessing.

While Ellen Barkin does not feature in the film, it remains a notable entry in the genre and showcases the talents of its cast and the director’s ability to create tension and suspense on-screen.

13. South Sea Sinner (1950)

“South Sea Sinner” is a 1950 drama film directed by H. Bruce Humberstone. While Ellen Barkin is an acclaimed actress, it’s important to note that “South Sea Sinner” was released in 1950, many years before Ellen Barkin began her acting career. Therefore, she does not appear in this film.

“South Sea Sinner” stars Macdonald Carey, Shelley Winters, and Luther Adler. It follows the story of a man named Johnny, played by Macdonald Carey, who escapes from prison and assumes a new identity on a remote South Pacific island.

There, he becomes involved with a singer named Rose, played by Shelley Winters, and a charismatic but dangerous man named Mr. Hendricks, played by Luther Adler.

While Ellen Barkin’s filmography doesn’t include “South Sea Sinner,” she has had a successful career with notable roles in films such as “The Big Easy,” “Sea of Love,” and “The Fan,” among others.

If you have any more questions or if there’s another topic you’d like to explore, please let me know.

14. I Died a Thousand Times (1955)

“I Died a Thousand Times” is a 1955 film noir directed by Stuart Heisler and starring Jack Palance, Shelley Winters, and Lee Marvin. The movie is a remake of the 1941 film “High Sierra,” which starred Humphrey Bogart.

In “I Died a Thousand Times,” Palance plays a hardened criminal named Roy Earle, who is released from prison and sets out to pull off one last big heist before retiring. Winters plays Marie Gibson, a dancehall girl who becomes involved with Earle and complicates his plans.

Winters’ performance in the film is notable for her portrayal of Marie as a complex and conflicted character, who is both attracted to Earle’s dangerous persona and repulsed by his violent tendencies.

Her chemistry with Palance is palpable, and their scenes together provide some of the film’s most memorable moments. The film also features Lee Marvin in an early role as one of Earle’s accomplices, adding to the cast’s strong ensemble.

Overall, “I Died a Thousand Times” is a solid remake of the classic film “High Sierra,” and features strong performances from its lead actors, including Shelley Winters.

While it may not be as well-known as other film noir classics from the era, it is still worth a watch for fans of the genre and those interested in Shelley Winters’ career.

I Died a Thousand Times
  • I Died a Thousand Times ( I Died a 1,000 Times )
  • I Died a Thousand Times
  • I Died a 1,000 Times
  • Jack Palance, Shelley Winters, Lori Nelson (Actors)
  • Stuart Heisler (Director) - I Died a Thousand Times ( I Died a 1,000 Times ) (Producer)

15. What’s the Matter with Helen? (1971)

“What’s the Matter with Helen?” is a 1971 psychological horror-thriller film directed by Curtis Harrington and starring Debbie Reynolds and Shelley Winters.

The film is set in 1930s Hollywood and follows two women, Adelle (Winters) and Helen (Reynolds), who have relocated to Los Angeles to escape their pasts.

As they try to start over, strange and terrifying events begin to occur, and Adelle becomes increasingly obsessed with her past and the possibility of her dark secrets being revealed. 

Meanwhile, Helen begins to suspect that Adelle may be involved in the strange occurrences and is hiding something from her.

“What’s the Matter with Helen?” was a moderate commercial success but received mixed reviews from critics upon its release. The film is known for its atmospheric setting, suspenseful plot, and strong performances by its lead actresses.

What's the Matter with Helen?/Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (Midnite Movies Double Feature)
  • Debbie Reynolds, Shelley Winters, Dennis Weaver (Actors)
  • Curtis Harrington (Director) - David D. Osborn (Writer)
  • English, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

16. Harper (1966)

“Harper” is a neo-noir crime film released in 1966. Directed by Jack Smight, the movie stars Paul Newman in the title role, along with Lauren Bacall, Julie Harris, and Janet Leigh.

The film follows Lew Harper (played by Paul Newman), a private detective hired by a wealthy and troubled California socialite named Elaine Sampson (played by Lauren Bacall).

Elaine’s husband has gone missing, and she suspects foul play. Harper delves into the case, encountering a web of deception, intrigue, and dangerous characters along the way.

As Harper investigates, he uncovers a complex network of corruption, greed, and secrets that extend far beyond the initial disappearance.

The film showcases the gritty and atmospheric style of classic film noir, with its morally ambiguous characters, hardboiled dialogue, and a labyrinthine plot.

“Harper” draws inspiration from Ross Macdonald’s detective novel “The Moving Target” and serves as an adaptation of the novel. The film captures the essence of the noir genre, featuring a flawed yet determined protagonist navigating a world filled with treachery and ambiguity.

Paul Newman’s performance as Lew Harper received critical acclaim, solidifying his status as a leading man in Hollywood. The movie also features a strong supporting cast, including Lauren Bacall as the enigmatic Elaine Sampson.

“Harper” is recognized for its stylish direction, intriguing storyline, and its ability to capture the essence of the hardboiled detective genre. It remains a notable entry in Paul Newman’s filmography and a well-regarded neo-noir film of the 1960s.

Harper (1966) [Blu-ray]
  • Paul Newman, Lauren Bacall, Julie Harris (Actors)
  • Jack Smight (Director)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

17. An Average Little Man (1977)

“An Average Little Man” is an Italian comedy-drama film released in 1977, directed by Mario Monicelli and starring Alberto Sordi in the lead role.

The film follows the story of Giovanni Vivaldi, a middle-aged, ordinary man who becomes increasingly disillusioned with his life and the people around him.

One reason to watch “An Average Little Man” is for Alberto Sordi’s outstanding performance. Sordi was a highly acclaimed Italian actor known for his ability to convey complex emotions through his characters, and his portrayal of Giovanni is no exception.

Sordi brings depth and nuance to the character, capturing both his frustration and his vulnerability, as well as his resilience and determination to overcome his obstacles.

Another reason to watch “An Average Little Man” is for its incisive commentary on Italian society and the human condition.

The film exposes the hypocrisies and contradictions of Italian middle-class life, and examines universal themes of alienation, social conformity, and the struggle for personal identity.

Finally, “An Average Little Man” is a beautifully crafted film that blends humor and pathos to create a moving and thought-provoking experience.

The film is both charming and insightful, offering a unique and memorable portrait of a man’s quest for meaning and purpose in life.

Overall, “An Average Little Man” is a timeless classic that continues to resonate with audiences today. Its outstanding performances, incisive commentary, and poignant storytelling make it a must-see for fans of Italian cinema and anyone interested in the human condition.

Un Borghese Piccolo Piccolo
  • PAL Region 2
  • Italian audio with Italian subtitles
  • No English language
  • Run time 115 min.
  • Alberto Sordi, Shelley Winters (Actors)

18. He Ran All the Way (1951)

“He Ran All the Way” is a 1951 film noir crime drama directed by John Berry. While Lauren Bacall is not part of the cast of “He Ran All the Way,” the film features John Garfield in the lead role, delivering a compelling performance as Nick Robey, a criminal on the run.

“He Ran All the Way” follows the story of Nick Robey, who, after committing a robbery, finds himself hiding out in a swimming pool.

He becomes involved with a family and holds them hostage while he tries to figure out his next move. As the tension escalates, Nick’s desperation and paranoia increase, leading to a gripping and suspenseful narrative.

Here are a few reasons to watch “He Ran All the Way”:

John Garfield’s Performance: John Garfield delivers a standout performance as Nick Robey. He brings a sense of vulnerability and intensity to the character, capturing Nick’s desperation and inner turmoil. Garfield’s nuanced portrayal adds depth and complexity to the film.

Tense Atmosphere and Film Noir Elements: “He Ran All the Way” effectively creates a tense and atmospheric mood, drawing on classic film noir elements.

The shadowy cinematography, morally ambiguous characters, and gritty urban setting contribute to the film’s noir sensibilities, immersing viewers in its dark and suspenseful world.

Exploration of Paranoia and Desperation: The film explores themes of paranoia and desperation, showcasing the psychological toll of a life on the run.

As Nick Robey becomes more entangled in his situation, his fear and anxiety intensify, leading to a gripping and emotionally charged narrative.

“He Ran All the Way” is a notable entry in the film noir genre, driven by John Garfield’s strong performance and the film’s tense atmosphere.

While Lauren Bacall is not involved in this particular film, fans of classic crime dramas and film noir will appreciate its compelling storyline and the exploration of themes such as paranoia and desperation.

It remains a captivating and suspenseful film that showcases the talents of John Garfield and the noir sensibilities of the era.

He Ran All the Way [Blu-ray]
  • John Garfield, Shelley Winters, Wallace Ford (Actors)
  • John Berry (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

19. The Three Sisters (1966)

“The Three Sisters” is a film adaptation of the play of the same name by Anton Chekhov, released in 1966.

Directed by Laurence Olivier, the movie features a talented ensemble cast, including Olivier himself, Alan Bates, and Joan Plowright. While Ellen Barkin does not appear in the film, I can provide information about it.

“The Three Sisters” follows the lives of the Prozorov sisters—Olga, Masha, and Irina—as they navigate the challenges and disappointments of their provincial Russian town. The film explores themes of longing, disillusionment, and the desire for a more meaningful existence.

Set over a span of several years, “The Three Sisters” captures the hopes and dreams of the sisters and their constant yearning for a better life in Moscow.

The film delves into the complexities of human relationships and the contrast between their aspirations and the realities they face.

Laurence Olivier’s adaptation of Chekhov’s play brings the intricate characters and their emotional journeys to life.

The film is known for its strong performances and its faithful interpretation of Chekhov’s poignant dialogue and themes. Olivier’s direction captures the essence of the play and creates a sense of intimacy and depth.

“The Three Sisters” offers a profound exploration of the human condition, with its characters grappling with the passage of time, unfulfilled desires, and the search for meaning in a changing world.

While Ellen Barkin does not feature in the film, it remains a significant cinematic adaptation of Chekhov’s work and showcases the talents of its acclaimed cast and director.

For those who appreciate thoughtful and introspective dramas that delve into the complexities of human existence, “The Three Sisters” is a film that offers a captivating and emotionally resonant experience.

Three Sisters
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

20. Over the Brooklyn Bridge (1984)

“Over the Brooklyn Bridge” is a 1984 comedy film directed by Menahem Golan. It stars Elliott Gould, Margaux Hemingway, and Sid Caesar. Although Ellen Barkin has had a prolific career, she does not appear in “Over the Brooklyn Bridge.”

The film follows the story of Alby Sherman, played by Elliott Gould, a middle-aged man who dreams of becoming a Broadway producer.

When his father, played by Sid Caesar, falls ill, Alby is faced with the responsibility of managing the family’s failing delicatessen in Brooklyn. Along the way, he encounters various humorous and chaotic situations as he tries to juggle his aspirations and family obligations.

While “Over the Brooklyn Bridge” doesn’t feature Ellen Barkin, it remains a notable film in Elliott Gould’s filmography.

The film blends comedy and drama, exploring themes of family, dreams, and the challenges of navigating personal and professional ambitions.

If you have any more questions or if there’s another topic you’d like to explore, please let me know.

OVER THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE (1984) Original Movie Poster 27x41 - Single-Sided - FOLDED - Carol Kane - Elliott Gould - Margaux Hemingway - Sid Caesar
  • This is an Original Authentic Poster issued by the studio
  • It measures approximately 27x41 inches
  • It is single-sided
  • This poster is a great collectors item
  • This is NOT a DVD

21. The Tenant (1976)

“The Tenant” is a 1976 psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski, who also stars in the film as the lead character.

The movie is based on the novel of the same name by Roland Topor, and follows a man named Trelkovsky (Polanski) who moves into an apartment in Paris that was recently vacated by a woman who committed suicide.

As he becomes increasingly paranoid and disturbed by the strange occurrences in the building, Trelkovsky begins to believe that his neighbors are conspiring against him and that he is slowly transforming into the former tenant who died by suicide.

Shelley Winters appears in a supporting role in the film as Madame Gaderian, a bizarre and eccentric resident of the apartment building who becomes a confidant of Trelkovsky.

Winters’ performance is typically idiosyncratic and memorable, with her character providing a sense of both comic relief and menace to the film’s tense and eerie atmosphere.

“The Tenant” is widely regarded as one of Polanski’s best films, and is noted for its haunting and surreal imagery, as well as its exploration of themes such as identity, paranoia, and mental breakdown.

Shelley Winters’ performance as Madame Gaderian adds to the film’s unsettling and off-kilter tone, and showcases her versatility as an actress in a film that is unlike any other in her filmography.

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The Tenant [DVD]
  • Roman Polanski, Isabelle Adjani, Melvyn Douglas (Actors)
  • Roman Polanski (Director) - Grard Brach (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

22. Larceny (1948)

“Larceny” is a crime film released in 1948, directed by George Sherman and starring John Payne, Joan Caulfield, and Dan Duryea. The film follows the story of Rick Maxon (John Payne), a former soldier who turns to a life of crime after struggling to find work.

Along with his partner, Silky Randall (Dan Duryea), Rick plans a daring heist to steal a shipment of diamonds.

Complicating matters is the arrival of Rick’s former flame, Ellen (Joan Caulfield), who is now engaged to a wealthy businessman involved in the diamond trade. Rick must decide between his love for Ellen and his desire for the diamonds.

The film was well-received upon its release and is noted for its suspenseful heist sequence and strong performances from the cast

. It has since become a classic example of film noir, a genre of crime film characterized by its dark, cynical themes and visual style.

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Larceny
  • John Payne, Joan Caulfield, Dan Duryea (Actors)
  • George Sherman (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

23. The Balcony (1963)

“The Balcony” is a drama film released in 1963. Directed by Joseph Strick, the movie is an adaptation of Jean Genet’s play of the same name.

The story is set in a brothel during a time of political unrest and revolution. The brothel serves as a sanctuary where clients can assume various roles and act out their fantasies.

The characters include the Queen, the Bishop, the Judge, the General, and the Chief of Police, among others.

As the revolution outside the brothel intensifies, the power dynamics and identities within the establishment start to blur.

The patrons and workers engage in role-playing scenarios that challenge their own notions of power, authority, and identity.

“The Balcony” explores themes of political and sexual power, illusion versus reality, and the masks people wear to navigate societal expectations. It delves into the nature of performance and the way individuals construct and deconstruct their identities.

The film adaptation of “The Balcony” received mixed reviews upon its release. It was considered experimental and avant-garde, pushing the boundaries of traditional narrative storytelling.

The movie aimed to capture the provocative and subversive spirit of Jean Genet’s play, but its unconventional approach may have limited its wider appeal.

“The Balcony” is often seen as a thought-provoking exploration of power dynamics and the nature of self-identity. It stands as a distinct and challenging piece of cinema that appeals to those interested in avant-garde theater and experimental storytelling.

The Balcony
  • Shelley Winters, Peter Falk, Lee Grant (Actors)
  • Joseph Strick (Director) - Ben Maddow (Writer) - Ben Maddow (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

24. The Big Knife (1955)

“The Big Knife” is a film noir released in 1955, directed by Robert Aldrich and starring Jack Palance in the lead role. The film is a dark and powerful critique of Hollywood’s corrupt studio system and the people who thrive within it.

One reason to watch “The Big Knife” is for its exceptional performances. Jack Palance delivers a powerful and nuanced performance as Charlie Castle, a successful actor who has become disillusioned with the Hollywood system.

The supporting cast, which includes actors like Ida Lupino and Shelley Winters, also delivers outstanding performances, adding depth and complexity to the film’s characters.

Another reason to watch “The Big Knife” is for its sharp critique of Hollywood and the studio system. The film exposes the dark side of the movie business, revealing the corrupt and ruthless practices that take place behind the scenes.

It also delves into the personal and professional struggles of actors and filmmakers caught up in this system, offering a complex and nuanced portrayal of the industry.

Finally, “The Big Knife” is a beautifully shot and expertly crafted film that captures the mood and atmosphere of film noir.

The film’s dark and moody cinematography, combined with its powerful performances and sharp script, make it a timeless classic that continues to resonate with audiences today.

Overall, “The Big Knife” is a must-see for fans of film noir and anyone interested in the inner workings of the movie business.

Its outstanding performances, sharp critique, and expert craftsmanship make it a powerful and thought-provoking film that is as relevant today as it was when it was first released.

The Big Knife (1955) ( Intimidad de una estrella ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, PAL, Reg.0 Import - Spain ]
  • The Big Knife (1955) ( Intimidad de una estrella )
  • The Big Knife (1955)
  • Intimidad de una estrella
  • Jack Palance, Rod Steiger, Ida Lupino (Actors)
  • Robert Aldrich (Director) - The Big Knife (1955) ( Intimidad de una estrella ) (Producer)

25. Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell (1968)

“Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell” is a 1968 comedy film directed by Melvin Frank. While Lauren Bacall is not part of the cast of “Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell,” the film features Gina Lollobrigida in the lead role, delivering a delightful performance as Carla Campbell.

“Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell” tells the story of a woman named Carla Campbell, who had multiple love affairs with different soldiers during World War II.

She raised a daughter, but never revealed the true identity of the father. Years later, the men return to her Italian village for a reunion, and chaos ensues as they discover they all believe they are the father of Carla’s daughter.

Here are a few reasons to watch “Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell”:

Lighthearted Comedy: “Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell” is a lighthearted comedy that provides plenty of laughs. The film’s premise creates a comedic situation filled with misunderstandings and mistaken identities, leading to humorous interactions and comedic chaos.

Charming Performances: The film features charming performances from its ensemble cast, led by Gina Lollobrigida as Carla Campbell. Lollobrigida brings charisma and charm to her role, navigating the comical complications with grace and wit.

The supporting cast, including Shelley Winters and Telly Savalas, also deliver enjoyable performances that add to the film’s comedic appeal.

Exploration of Relationships and Identity: “Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell” explores themes of relationships and identity in an entertaining and comedic manner.

As the men confront the possibility of being the father, their interactions with Carla and each other shed light on the complexities of love, parenthood, and personal identity.

“Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell” offers a delightful and humorous cinematic experience, driven by Gina Lollobrigida’s charming performance and the film’s exploration of relationships and identity.

While Lauren Bacall is not involved in this particular film, fans of lighthearted comedies and enjoyable ensemble casts will find “Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell” to be an entertaining watch.

It remains a classic comedy that showcases the talents of its cast and provides an amusing and heartwarming story.

Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell
  • Gina Lollobrigida, Shelley Winters, Phil Silvers (Actors)
  • Melvin Frank (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

3 Reasons To Watch Shelley Winters Movies

Versatility and Range: Shelley Winters was an incredibly versatile actress who portrayed a wide range of characters throughout her career.

From dramatic roles to comedic performances, she showcased her ability to immerse herself in diverse roles and bring depth and authenticity to her characters.

Watching Shelley Winters movies allows you to witness her versatility as an actress and appreciate her ability to tackle different genres and characters with equal skill.

Compelling and Memorable Performances: Shelley Winters was known for delivering powerful and memorable performances. She had a natural ability to captivate audiences and leave a lasting impression with her acting.

Her performances were often marked by emotional intensity and a willingness to fully commit to her characters, creating authentic and nuanced portrayals.

Whether she played complex, conflicted characters or showcased her comedic timing, Winters’ performances were consistently captivating.

Award-Winning Talent: Shelley Winters’ talent as an actress was widely recognized, as evidenced by her numerous accolades.

She won two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actress, for her roles in “The Diary of Anne Frank” (1959) and “A Patch of Blue” (1965).

These awards highlight her exceptional acting abilities and the critical acclaim she received for her performances. Watching Shelley Winters movies allows you to witness the work of an award-winning actress at the height of her craft.

In summary, watching Shelley Winters movies offers an opportunity to appreciate her versatility as an actress, experience her compelling and memorable performances, and witness the talent of an award-winning actress.

Whether it’s her dramatic roles or comedic turns, Winters’ screen presence and acting prowess make her films worth watching for fans of classic cinema.

Best Shelley Winters Movies – Wrap Up

Shelley Winters was a highly acclaimed and versatile American actress known for her remarkable talent and ability to portray a wide range of characters.

Throughout her career, she delivered powerful performances that left a lasting impact on audiences and solidified her status as one of Hollywood’s most respected actresses.

In this wrap-up of Shelley Winters’ best movies, we have explored some of the notable films that showcased her exceptional acting abilities and contributed to her success in the industry.

One of Winters’ standout films is “A Place in the Sun” (1951), where she portrayed Alice Tripp, a working-class woman involved in a complicated love triangle.

Her performance earned her an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and demonstrated her ability to bring depth and complexity to her characters.

Another noteworthy film in Winters’ filmography is “The Night of the Hunter” (1955), where she played Willa Harper, a vulnerable woman caught in the clutches of a deceitful preacher.

Her portrayal added a layer of pathos to the film and showcased her ability to convey fear and desperation on screen.

Winters’ role as Charlotte Haze in “Lolita” (1962) is also deserving of recognition. Her performance as the delusional and possessive mother was both disturbing and captivating, showcasing her ability to tackle complex and controversial characters.

Additionally, her portrayal of Mrs. Van Daan in “The Diary of Anne Frank” (1959) earned her an Academy Award nomination.

Winters delivered a poignant and heartfelt performance, bringing humanity to a character facing unimaginable circumstances.

Throughout her career, Shelley Winters demonstrated her versatility in a wide range of genres, including dramas, comedies, and thrillers.

Her ability to embody characters with depth, vulnerability, and strength made her a force to be reckoned with on the screen.

While this wrap-up focuses on some of Shelley Winters’ best movies, it is worth noting that her filmography is rich with diverse roles and memorable performances that have left an indelible impact on audiences.

If you have any more questions or if there’s another topic you’d like to explore, please let me know.