Terence Davies is an English filmmaker and screenwriter known for his distinctive and personal style of filmmaking.

Born in 1945 in Liverpool, England, Davies grew up in a working-class Catholic family and has often explored themes of memory, identity, and the human experience in his films.

Davies began his career in the arts as a writer and a painter, but he eventually turned to filmmaking in the 1970s.

His first feature film, “Distant Voices, Still Lives” (1988), is a semi-autobiographical account of his childhood in Liverpool, and is known for its vivid and stylized depiction of working-class life in post-war Britain.

Davies’ other notable films include “The Long Day Closes” (1992), which explores the coming-of-age of a young boy in 1950s Liverpool, “The Neon Bible” (1995), an adaptation of the John Kennedy Toole novel of the same name, and “Sunset Song” (2015), a period drama set in rural Scotland.

Davies is known for his distinctive visual style, which often features long, static shots and meticulously crafted compositions.

He has also been praised for his use of music and sound, which often evoke a sense of nostalgia and longing.

In addition to his work in film, Davies has also written and directed for the stage, and has published a number of books and essays on film and literature.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors for his contributions to the arts, and is considered one of the most important and influential British filmmakers of his generation.

Best Terence Davies Films

Let’s take a look at the top Terence Davies movies.

1. Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988)

“Distant Voices, Still Lives” is a drama film directed by Terence Davies and released in 1988. The film is a semi-autobiographical account of Davies’ childhood in Liverpool, England, and explores the lives of a working-class family in the 1940s and 1950s.

The film is notable for its innovative structure, which is composed of a series of fragmented memories and vignettes that together create a powerful portrait of family life.

The film explores the themes of memory, loss, and nostalgia, and is marked by a poetic and dreamlike visual style.

“Distant Voices, Still Lives” is widely regarded as a masterpiece of British cinema, and has been praised for its artistry and emotional power.

The film won a number of awards, including the Best Film award at the 1988 Cannes Film Festival, and has since become a cult classic.

Its innovative approach to storytelling and its powerful themes of family and memory make it a must-see for any serious film enthusiast.

Sale
Distant Voices, Still Lives [1988] [DVD]
  • Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988)
  • Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988)
  • Pete Postlethwaite, Lorraine Ashbourne, Jean Boht (Actors)
  • Terence Davies (Director) - Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)

2. The Long Day Closes (1992)

“The Long Day Closes” is a 1992 British drama film directed by Terence Davies. The movie is a semi-autobiographical account of Davies’ childhood in 1950s Liverpool, and it tells the story of 11-year-old Bud,

a sensitive and imaginative boy who is struggling to come to terms with his family, his school, and the world around him.

The film is notable for its innovative style, which blends together elements of documentary and fiction filmmaking, as well as its use of music and sound to create a vivid and emotional portrait of the period.

The movie is a lyrical and poetic tribute to the innocence of childhood and the power of memory, and it features a standout performance by Leigh McCormack as Bud.

Overall, “The Long Day Closes” is a deeply personal and affecting film that showcases Davies’ talent as a director and his gift for capturing the beauty and complexity of everyday life.

It’s a must-watch for fans of British cinema and anyone who appreciates thoughtful and moving storytelling.

Sale
The Long Day Closes (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray + DVD]
  • Leigh Mc Cormack, Nicholas Lamont, Marjorie Yates (Actors)
  • Terence Davies (Director) - William Diver (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

3. The Deep Blue Sea (2011)

“The Deep Blue Sea” is a 2011 British romantic drama film written and directed by Terence Davies, based on the 1952 play of the same name by Terence Rattigan.

The film tells the story of Hester Collyer (played by Rachel Weisz), a woman in 1950s London who falls in love with a former RAF pilot, Freddie Page (played by Tom Hiddleston), despite being married to a high court judge.

The film is notable for its striking visuals and its use of color and lighting to evoke a sense of the emotional and psychological states of the characters.

It is also known for its powerful performances, particularly that of Rachel Weisz, who won critical acclaim for her portrayal of Hester Collyer.

“The Deep Blue Sea” is a nuanced and sensitive exploration of love, desire, and the constraints of social convention in post-war Britain.

It has been praised for its evocative and atmospheric portrayal of a bygone era, as well as for its poignant and affecting portrayal of its central characters.

The film has been described as a powerful and moving work of cinema that showcases Davies’ skill as a storyteller and his ability to capture the complexities and nuances of human relationships on screen.

The Deep Blue Sea [2011] [DVD]
  • Polish Release, cover may contain Polish text/markings. The disk has English audio.

4. Of Time And The City (2008)

“Of Time and the City” is a documentary film directed by Terence Davies and released in 2008. The film is a personal meditation on the city of Liverpool, England, and its evolution over the course of the 20th century.

The film is constructed primarily from archive footage and home movies, and features Davies’ own narration, as well as a rich soundtrack that includes music, poetry, and speeches.

The film explores themes such as nostalgia, memory, and loss, and offers a powerful reflection on the relationship between people and the places they call home.

“Of Time and the City” is notable for its innovative approach to the documentary form, and for the artistry and craftsmanship of its construction.

The film has been widely praised by critics, and has been hailed as a masterpiece of non-fiction filmmaking. Its powerful themes and innovative approach to storytelling make it a must-see for anyone interested in the history and culture of cities, and in the art of documentary filmmaking.

Of Time and The City
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Terence Davies (Actor)
  • Terence Davies (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

5. Sunset Song (2015)

Sunset Song” is a 2015 British drama film directed by Terence Davies, based on the 1932 novel of the same name by Lewis Grassic Gibbon.

The movie tells the story of Chris Guthrie (played by Agyness Deyn), a young woman growing up in a rural Scottish community in the early 20th century.

The film explores themes of love, loss, and the struggle to maintain traditions in a rapidly changing world, as Chris navigates her way through a series of personal and family tragedies, including the death of her mother and the brutal treatment of her abusive father.

The movie is notable for its stunning visuals, which capture the beauty and harshness of the Scottish landscape, as well as its strong performances, particularly from Deyn in the lead role.

The film also features an evocative score by composer Gast Waltzing, which adds to the movie’s emotional impact.

Overall, “Sunset Song” is a beautifully crafted and emotionally resonant film that explores the complexities of family, tradition, and change with sensitivity and grace.

It’s a must-watch for fans of period dramas and anyone who appreciates powerful storytelling and great filmmaking.

Sunset Song
  • Peter Mullan (Actor)
  • Terence Davies (Director)
  • Spanish (Subtitle)
  • Spanish (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

6. A Quiet Passion (2017)

“A Quiet Passion” is a 2016 biographical drama film written and directed by Terence Davies. The film explores the life and work of American poet Emily Dickinson, played by Cynthia Nixon, from her early years as a student to her later years as a reclusive and largely unpublished writer.

The film is known for its strong performances, particularly that of Cynthia Nixon, who won critical acclaim for her portrayal of Emily Dickinson.

The film is also notable for its attention to historical detail and its meticulous recreation of 19th-century New England.

“A Quiet Passion” has been praised for its sensitive and nuanced portrayal of Emily Dickinson’s life and work, as well as for its exploration of the struggles and challenges faced by women in 19th-century America.

The film has been described as a moving and thought-provoking work of cinema that showcases Davies’ skill as a director and his ability to bring historical figures to life on screen.

Overall, “A Quiet Passion” is a powerful and affecting film that explores the life of one of America’s most beloved poets and offers a nuanced and insightful look into the world of 19th-century America.

Sale
A Quiet Passion
  • Cynthia Nixon, Jennifer Ehle, Keith Carradine (Actors)
  • Terrence Davies (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)

7. The House Of Mirth (2000)

“The House of Mirth” is a drama film directed by Terence Davies and released in 2000. The film is based on the novel of the same name by Edith Wharton, and follows the story of Lily Bart (played by Gillian Anderson), a beautiful and charming socialite in New York City in the early 1900s.

The film explores themes such as social class, gender roles, and the pressures of society, and is notable for its nuanced and complex portrayal of the character of Lily Bart.

The film also features a rich and detailed recreation of the world of high society in turn-of-the-century New York, and is marked by Davies’ characteristic attention to detail and artistry.

“The House of Mirth” was widely acclaimed by critics upon its release, and has since become a cult classic. The film is notable for its powerful performances, its richly textured visual style, and its incisive commentary on the social and cultural forces that shape our lives.

Its exploration of the challenges faced by women in a patriarchal society make it a particularly relevant and resonant film today.

Sale
The House of Mirth [DVD]
  • Gillian Anderson, Eric Stoltz, Dan Aykroyd (Actors)
  • Terence Davies (Director) - Olivia Stewart (Producer)
  • English, French, Spanish (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

3 Characteristics of Terence Davies Films

Terence Davies is a British filmmaker known for his visually stunning and emotionally powerful films. Here are three characteristics of his films:

Personal storytelling: Davies’ films often draw heavily from his own experiences and memories, exploring themes of family, class, and religion.

Many of his films are semi-autobiographical and feature deeply personal and nuanced characterizations.

Attention to detail: Davies is known for his meticulous attention to detail in both the visual and audio elements of his films. He often uses slow, precise camera movements and carefully chosen music to create a distinct mood and atmosphere.

Historical and cultural context: Many of Davies’ films are set in specific historical periods and locations, and he uses these settings to explore larger themes of social and cultural change.

He is particularly interested in the impact of economic and political forces on everyday people and communities.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch Terence Davies Films

Captivating storytelling: Terence Davies is known for his ability to create deeply moving and captivating stories on film. His films are often characterized by their attention to detail, poetic language, and emotionally resonant themes that explore the human condition.

Whether he is adapting literary classics or creating his own original stories, Davies’s films are always engaging and thought-provoking.

Unique visual style: Davies is also known for his unique visual style, which often involves intricate compositions, painterly images, and a keen attention to color and lighting.

His films are visually stunning and often have an almost dreamlike quality that serves to heighten the emotional impact of the story.

Strong performances: Davies is known for his ability to elicit powerful and nuanced performances from his actors.

Whether he is working with established stars or lesser-known performers, Davies has a talent for bringing out the best in his cast and creating memorable characters that stay with the audience long after the film has ended.

Rachel Weisz’s heartbreaking portrayal of Hester Collyer in “The Deep Blue Sea” to Cynthia Nixon’s captivating performance as Emily Dickinson in “A Quiet Passion,” Davies’s films are often defined by their powerful and affecting performances.

Best Terence Davies Films – Wrapping Up

Terence Davies is a highly regarded British filmmaker known for his artistry, attention to detail, and exploration of complex themes such as memory, nostalgia, and social class. Some of his most acclaimed films include:

“Distant Voices, Still Lives” (1988) – This semi-autobiographical film explores the lives of a working-class family in Liverpool during the 1940s and 1950s.

The film is notable for its innovative structure and its powerful themes of memory, loss, and nostalgia.

“The Long Day Closes” (1992) – This film is another semi-autobiographical work that follows the life of a young boy growing up in Liverpool during the 1950s. The film is marked by its poetic and dreamlike visual style and its exploration of the power of memory and imagination.

“The House of Mirth” (2000) – This adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel tells the story of a socialite in turn-of-the-century New York who struggles to navigate the pressures and expectations of high society.

The film is notable for its nuanced portrayal of the central character and its exploration of the complexities of social class and gender roles.

“Of Time and the City” (2008) – This documentary film is a personal meditation on the city of Liverpool and its evolution over the course of the 20th century.

The film is notable for its innovative approach to the documentary form and its powerful themes of memory, nostalgia, and loss.

Overall, Terence Davies’ films are marked by their artistry, attention to detail, and incisive exploration of complex themes. They are a must-see for any serious film enthusiast.