Alfred Hitchcock is a fantastic filmmaker who’s brought many brilliant films to screens all over the world. In this article, we list what we believe to be the best Alfred Hitchcock movies.

Hitchcock has produced screen magic with Vertigo, Rear Window, and Psycho, among many others. His cinematic canon is wide and deep and we believe this list demonstrates that. Hitchcock truly is one of the greats, one of the original greats!

So whether you’re doing research on him, or ready to sit down and watch one of these movies tonight, this list of the top Alfred Hitchcock films will be just what you need!

It should be noted that we’ve included the films in rough ranking order. But with a filmmaker like Alfred Hitchcock, the work is so good that it’s really hard to form an exact order.

So, without further ado, let’s jump right in and list the best Alfred Hitchcock movies!

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies – The List

Let’s start off this list of the best Alfred Hitchcock movies with an absolute cinema classic, Vertigo.

Vertigo (1958)

Vertigo is a masterpiece of suspenseful storytelling and cinematic artistry.

The film follows detective John “Scottie” Ferguson (James Stewart) as he investigates a mysterious woman named Madeleine (Kim Novak) who seems to be possessed by the spirit of her ancestor.

As Scottie becomes increasingly obsessed with Madeleine, the film takes on a dreamlike quality, blurring the lines between reality and illusion.

Director Alfred Hitchcock expertly weaves together themes of love, obsession, and identity, creating a haunting and unforgettable viewing experience.

The film’s cinematography is stunning, with Hitchcock utilizing a variety of techniques to convey Scottie’s vertigo and disorientation.

Stewart andak give captivating performances, with their chemistry and nuanced acting adding depth to the intricate plot.

Bernard Herrmann’s score is also a standout, heightening the tension and drama of each scene.

 

Vertigo
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • James Stewart, Kim Novak, Barbara Bel Geddes (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Alec Coppel (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

Rear Window (1954)

Rear Window is a Hitchcock masterpiece that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish. James Stewart delivers a captivating performance as L.B. Jefferies, a photographer confined to his apartment due to a broken leg.

His boredom leads him to spy on his neighbors, but things take a sinister turn when he suspects one of them of murder.

The film’s use of sound and visuals is exceptional, with Hitchcock expertly building tension through the use of silence and subtle camera movements.

The supporting cast, including Grace Kelly as Jefferies’ love interest and Thelma Ritter as his nurse, add depth and humor to the story.

What sets Rear Window apart is its exploration of voyeurism and the art of storytelling.

As Jefferies watches his neighbors’ lives unfold, he becomes a witness to their secrets and struggles.

The film raises questions about the morality of watching others without their knowledge and the power of observation in storytelling.

 

Rear Window
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - John Michael Hayes (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Birds (1963)

“The Birds” directed by Alfred Hitchcock is a classic horror-thriller that still manages to send shivers down your spine even after all these years.

The movie follows the story of a wealthy socialite named Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren) who travels to a small town in California to deliver a pair of love birds to a potential suitor.

However, things take a dark turn when birds in the area start attacking people without any explanation.

Hitchcock’s masterful direction and attention to detail are on full display here, as he expertly builds tension and suspense throughout the film.

The use of sound, especially the haunting sound of the bird calls, adds to the eerie atmosphere and makes the audience feel like they are right in the middle of the chaos.

The performances by the cast are also top-notch, with Tippi Hedren delivering a standout performance as the brave and determined Melanie.

The supporting cast, including Rod Taylor and Jessica Tandy, also do a great job in their respective roles.

 

The Birds (4K UHD)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Rod Taylor, Tippi Hedren, Jessica Tandy (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Evan Hunter (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Psycho (1960)

Psycho is a masterpiece of suspense and horror that has stood the test of time.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, this film tells the story Crane (Janet Leigh), a secretary who steals money from her employer and ends up at the Bates Motel, run by the mysterious Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins).

From the iconic shower scene to the eerie score, Psycho keeps you on the edge of your seat from beginning to end.

The performances by Leigh and Perkins are outstanding, with Perkins’ portrayal of Norman Bates being particularly chilling.

What sets Psycho apart from other horror films is its psychological depth.

Hitchcock delves into the minds of his characters, exploring themes of guilt, repression, and the duality of human nature.

 

Psycho (4K UHD)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Joseph Stefano (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Rope (1948)

Rope is a masterful Hitchcock thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

The film centers around two young men who strangle their friend to death just for the thrill of it, and then proceed to host a dinner party with the victim’s body hidden in a chest.

The tension and suspense are palpable throughout, as the guests unknowingly dine just inches away from the gruesome truth.

James Stewart delivers another standout performance as the suspicious professor who begins to unravel the dark secret at the heart of the party.

What sets Rope apart from other thrillers is the way it’s shot – the entire film is presented as if it were one continuous take, adding to the sense of claustrophobia and unease.

The cinematography is stunning, with Hitchcock’s signature use of light and shadow creating a hauntingly beautiful atmosphere.

 

Rope
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • James Stewart, John Dall, Farley Granger (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Arthur Laurents (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

North by Northwest (1959)

North by Northwest is a thrilling classic that has stood the test of time. The film starts with a mistaken identity, which leads to the protagonist, Roger Thornhill, being chased across the country by both the police and a group of spies.

The suspenseful plot is expertly crafted, and the pacing keeps you on the edge of your seat throughout.

The film boasts some of Alfred Hitchcock’s most iconic scenes, including the crop-dusting plane attack and the climactic chase on Mount Rushmore.

Cary Grant delivers a charming and charismatic performance as Thornhill, while Eva Marie Saint gives a nuanced and complex performance as the enigmatic femme fatale.

The cinematography is stunning, with breathtaking shots of New York City, the Midwestern prairies, and the iconic Mount Rushmore.

The score by Bernard Herrmann is also notable, adding to the tension and excitement of the film.

 

North by Northwest
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Cary Grant, Eva Saint, James Mason (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Ernest Lehman (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Languages)
  • English (Subtitle)

The 39 Steps (1935)

The 39 Steps is a thrilling masterpiece of British cinema that stands the test of time.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, the film is a perfect blend of suspense, humor, and romance.

The story follows Richard Hannay (Robert Donat), a man who is wrongly accused of murder and goes on the run to clear his name.

Along the way, he meets the beautiful and mysterious Pamela (Madeleine Carroll), and together they uncover a sinister plot involving a secret organization known as “The 39 Steps.”

Donat’s performance as the charming and resourceful Hannay is absolutely captivating, and Carroll’s portrayal of the feisty but vulnerable Pamela is equally impressive.

The chemistry between the two leads is palpable, and their banter provides some much-needed comic relief amidst the tension and danger of their situation.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, using clever camera angles and editing techniques to ramp up the suspense and keep the audience on the edge of their seats.

The iconic scene on the Forth Bridge is a standout moment that showcases his skill at building tension and creating memorable set pieces.

 

The Thirty-Nine Steps
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Robert Donat, Madeleine Carroll (Actors)
  • Alred Hitchcock (Director) - John Buchan (Writer) - Michael Balcon (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Wrong Man (1956)

“The Wrong Man” is a haunting and powerful film that will leave you on the edge of your seat from beginning to end.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this movie tells the true story of a man who is falsely accused of a crime and the devastating consequences that follow.

Henry Fonda delivers a stunning performance as the lead character, Manny Balestrero.

His portrayal of a man who is falsely accused and subsequently imprisoned is both heartbreaking and captivating.

Vera Miles, who plays Manny’s wife, Rose, is equally impressive as she struggles to cope with the reality of her husband’s incarceration.

The film’s black and white cinematography adds to the overall sense of dread and claustrophobia, as Hitchcock expertly captures the feeling of being trapped in a world that is unjust and unforgiving.

While “The Wrong Man” may not be one of Hitchcock’s most well-known films, it is certainly one of his most emotionally resonant.

It is a must-watch for fans of classic cinema, and anyone who appreciates a well-crafted story that will stay with them long after the credits have rolled.

 

The Wrong Man (1956)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony Quayle (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Maxwell Anderson (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Suspicion (1941)

“Suspicion” is a gripping Hitchcock thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Joan Fontaine delivers a mesmerizing performance as Lina, a young woman who falls in love with the charming and mysterious Johnnie, played by Cary Grant. As their relationship deepens, Lina begins to suspect that Johnnie may not be the man she thought he was, and the tension builds to a thrilling climax.

Hitchcock masterfully builds suspense throughout the film, using shadowy lighting, ominous music, and clever camera angles to keep the audience guessing.

The chemistry between Fontaine and Grant is electric, and the supporting cast is strong as well, with standout performances from Nigel Bruce and Cedric Hardwicke.

While some may find the ending a bit unsatisfying, overall “Suspicion” is a classic Hitchcock film that is well worth watching for fans of the genre. Highly recommended.

 

Suspicion
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Cary Grant, Joan Fontaine, Cedric Hardwicke (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Samson Raphaelson (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Frenzy (1972)

Frenzy (1972) is a gripping and gruesome thriller that tells the story of a serial killer on the loose in London.

Directed by the master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, the film features some of the most intense and disturbing scenes in his entire body of work.

The film follows the life of Richard Blaney, a down-on-his-luck ex-RAF pilot who becomes the prime suspect in a series of brutal murders.

As the police close in on him, Blaney must race against time to clear his name and catch the real killer, who is still at large.

What makes Frenzy so effective is the way Hitchcock builds tension and suspense throughout the film.

From the opening scene, where we see the killer stalking his prey, to the climactic finale, the film keeps us on the edge of our seats, never letting us relax for a single moment.

The performances are also top-notch, with Jon Finch delivering a standout turn as Richard Blaney, and Barry Foster perfectly embodying the charming yet sinister killer.

The supporting cast is equally impressive, with strong performances from Anna Massey, Barbara Leigh-Hunt, and Alec McCowen.

 

Frenzy
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Jon Finch, Alec McCowen, Barry Foster (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Arthur La Bern (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

To Catch a Thief (1955)

To Catch a Thief (1955) is a classic Hitchcockian thriller that will keep you guessing till the very end.

Set in the beautiful French Riviera, the film follows retired jewel thief John Robie (Cary Grant) as he tries to clear his name after a series of high-profile robberies take place in the area.

The chemistry between Grant and his co-star Grace Kelly is electric, and their playful banter adds a touch of romance to the film.

The stunning scenery of the French Riviera is also a highlight, with the film showcasing some of the most beautiful locations in the world.

The plot twists and turns, keeping you on the edge of your seat, and the final reveal is both satisfying and unexpected.

The film’s score is also noteworthy, perfectly complementing the action on screen.

 

To Catch a Thief
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - John Michael Hayes (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Foreign Correspondent (1940)

Foreign Correspondent is a gripping and suspenseful thriller that expertly captures the dangers and intrigue of international espionage in the lead up to World War II.

Director Alfred Hitchcock masterfully weaves together a complex and thrilling plot that follows the exploits of a young American journalist (played by Joel McCrea) as he tries to uncover a sinister conspiracy involving a group of Nazi spies.

The film is a testament to Hitchcock’s incredible storytelling abilities and his ability to build tension and suspense through masterful pacing and expertly-crafted set pieces.

The performances in Foreign Correspondent are top-notch, with McCrea delivering a compelling and nuanced performance as the intrepid journalist who finds himself embroiled in a dangerous game of cat and mouse.

The supporting cast is equally impressive, with standout performances from Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, and George Sanders.

The film’s stunning black and white cinematography is also worth noting, with Hitchcock using a variety of camera angles and techniques to create a sense of unease and tension throughout.

Ultimately, Foreign Correspondent is a classic thriller that stands the test of time and remains just as engaging and suspenseful today as it did when it was first released over 80 years ago.

Hitchcock’s mastery of the genre is on full display here, and the film is a must-see for anyone who loves a good spy thriller. Highly recommended.

 

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The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

The Man Who Knew Too Much is a classic thriller from master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock, and it does not disappoint.

Starring James Stewart and Doris Day as a couple caught up in an international conspiracy, the film is a gripping tale of suspense and intrigue that will keep you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, as always, and the film is full of his trademark suspenseful moments and clever twists.

The standout sequence is undoubtedly the famous assassination attempt scene in the Royal Albert Hall, which is a masterclass in tension and pacing.

Stewart and Day are both excellent in their roles, with Stewart bringing his trademark everyman charm and Day showing off her impressive singing voice in a key scene.

The supporting cast is also strong, with standout performances from Bernard Miles and Brenda de Banzie.

 

The Man Who Knew Too Much
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • James Stewart, Doris Day, Daniel Gelin (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - John Michael Hayes (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Lifeboat (1944)

Lifeboat is a masterclass in tension, suspense, and human nature.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this film takes place entirely on a lifeboat in the middle of the ocean, where a group of survivors from a torpedoed ship must band together to survive.

What follows is a gripping exploration of morality, survival instincts, and trust. The ensemble cast, led by the phenomenal Tallulah Bankhead, delivers standout performances that keep you on the edge of your seat.

Hitchcock’s signature style is evident in every frame, as he expertly builds the tension and keeps you guessing until the very end.

The black and white cinematography and minimalistic setting only add to the film’s claustrophobic atmosphere.

Lifeboat is a true classic that stands the test of time, and a must-watch for any film lover.

 

Lifeboat
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix, Walter Slezak (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Alfred Hitchcock (Writer) - Kenneth Macgowan (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Spellbound (1945)

Spellbound is a Hitchcockian masterpiece that will leave you spellbound indeed.

The film tells the story of a young psychiatrist, played brilliantly by Ingrid Bergman, who falls in love with her patient, a man with amnesia played by Gregory Peck.

As she tries to uncover his past, she becomes embroiled in a thrilling mystery that will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end.

Hitchcock’s signature suspenseful style is on full display in Spellbound, with stunning visuals and a haunting score that perfectly complement the film’s psychological themes.

Bergman’s performance is captivating, as she navigates the complexities of her relationship with Peck’s while also dealing with her own past trauma.

But what truly sets Spellbound apart is its use of dream sequences, designed by Salvador Dali himself.

These surreal and visually stunning scenes add an extra layer of mystery and intrigue to the already captivating story.

 

Spellbound [Blu-ray]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gregory Peck, Ingrid Bergman, Leo G. Carroll (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

Shadow of a Doubt is a classic Hitchcock thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end.

The film tells the story of a young girl named Charlie who idolizes her charming and witty uncle, also named Charlie, who comes for an extended visit.

But as she begins to suspect that he may not be the man she thought he was, the tension builds to a chilling climax.

One of the standout features of the film is the incredible performances by the cast, particularly Joseph Cotten as Uncle Charlie.

He effortlessly switches between charming and sinister, leaving the audience unsure of his true intentions.

Teresa Wright also shines as the conflicted and curious young Charlie, who becomes increasingly determined to uncover the truth about her uncle.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, as always, with his signature use of suspense and tension building throughout the film.

The scenes between the two Charlies are particularly compelling, with a palpable sense of danger lurking beneath their banter.

 

Shadow of a Doubt
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten, Macdonald Carey (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Thornton Wilder (Writer) - Jack H. Skirball (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Lady Vanishes (1938)

The Lady Vanishes is a classic thriller that has stood the test of time.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this film is a masterclass in suspenseful storytelling. Set in a small European town, the plot revolves around the disappearance of a young woman named Miss Froy.

As the search for her intensifies, a group of passengers on a train become embroiled in a web of intrigue and danger.

The cast is superb, with standout performances from Margaret Lockwood as Iris, the plucky heroine, and Michael Redgrave as Gilbert, the charming and enigmatic stranger who helps her in her quest.

The chemistry between the two leads is electric, and their banter is delightful.

The Lady Vanishes is a perfect example of Hitchcock’s skill in building tension and creating a sense of unease.

From the eerie opening shot to the nail-biting finale, this film will keep you on the edge of your seat.

The use of sound and music is particularly effective, adding to the sense of foreboding and suspense.

 

Alfred Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes - Original 1938 Classic, Restored & Uncut!
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Margaret Lockwood, Michael Redgrave, Paul Lukas (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Ethel Lina White (Writer) - Edward Black (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Rebecca (1940)

Rebecca is a classic masterpiece that stands the test of time.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, the film is a hauntingly beautiful adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s gothic novel.

The film is a perfect example of Hitchcock’s mastery of suspense and atmosphere.

The story follows the young and inexperienced Mrs. de Winter (Joan Fontaine) who marries the wealthy Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) and moves to his grand estate, Manderley.

However, she finds herself living in the shadow of Maxim’s deceased first wife, Rebecca, whose presence is still felt throughout the house.

The film is a visual feast, with stunning cinematography and elegant costumes.

The Gothic architecture of Manderley adds eerie and to The performances Fontaine and their chemistry and adding to the film’s intrigue.

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Rebecca (The Criterion Collection) [DVD]
  • Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Strangers on a Train (1951)

Strangers on a Train is a masterful thriller directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock.

The film tells the story of two strangers, Guy Haines (Farley Granger) and Bruno Anthony (Robert Walker), who meet on a train and begin a conversation that spirals out of control.

The premise of the film is simple: each man will murder someone the other wants dead, thus eliminating any motive for the crime.

But as the plot unfolds, the tension builds and the consequences of their agreement become increasingly dire.

Hitchcock’s direction is as impeccable as ever, with each shot carefully crafted to heighten the film’s suspense.

The use of shadow and light is particularly effective, creating an eerie atmosphere that keeps the audience on edge.

The performances are also top-notch, with Granger and Walker perfectly embodying their characters’ conflicting personalities.

But what truly sets Strangers on a Train apart from other thrillers is its exploration of the human psyche.

The film delves into themes of guilt, obsession, and the consequences of our actions. It’s a dark and twisted journey that will leave you questioning the nature of humanity.

 

Strangers on a Train
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Farley Granger, Ruth Roman, Robert Walker (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Raymond Chandler (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Notorious (1946)

Notorious is a Hitchcockian masterpiece that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman deliver stunning performances as two individuals caught in a web of espionage and romance.

The film’s iconic long take during the party scene is a technical marvel that still amazes audiences to this day.

Hitchcock’s direction is flawless, building tension with every shot and keeping the audience guessing until the very end.

The chemistry between Grant and Bergman is palpable, making their forbidden love all the more heartbreaking. Notorious is a classic that deserves a spot on every film lover’s watchlist.

 

Sale
Notorious (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
  • Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant, Claude Rains (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Dial M for Murder (1954)

Dial M for Murder is a quintessential thriller film that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, and Robert Cummings, this film tells the story of a former tennis player who hires a hitman to murder his unfaithful wife.

What makes this film so compelling is the intricate plot that keeps you guessing until the very end.

The characters are all wonderfully crafted, with Ray Milland giving a standout performance as the calculating and manipulative husband.

Grace Kelly is also brilliant as the wife caught in the middle of a deadly plot.

The use of camera angles and lighting is masterful, creating a sense of tension and unease throughout the film.

Hitchcock’s signature style is on full display here, with every shot and every detail carefully crafted to enhance the story.

Overall, Dial M for Murder is a must-see for fans of the thriller genre and for anyone who appreciates masterful filmmaking.

It’s a classic for a reason and will leave you thoroughly entertained and satisfied.

 

Dial M for Murder
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Robert Cummings (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Frederick Knott (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941)

As a fan of classic Hollywood screwball comedies, I was excited to finally watch “Mr. & Mrs. Smith” (1941) Carard and film tells the of a couple who, after three years of marriage, discover that their marriage was never actually legal.

Chaos ensues as they try to navigate their newfound single lives while still secretly pining for each other.

Lombard and Montgomery have excellent chemistry, and their banter and physical comedy are a delight to watch.

The supporting cast, including Gene Raymond and Jack Carson, also add to the film’s humor and charm.

While the film may not be as well-known as other screwball comedies of the era, such as “Bringing Up Baby” or “The Philadelphia Story,” it holds up as an entertaining and enjoyable romp. The film’s ending may be predictable, but it’s still satisfying and heartwarming.

Mr. & Mrs. Smith
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Carole Lombard, Robert Montgomery, Gene Raymond (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Norman Krasna (Writer) - Harry E. Edington (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Topaz (1969)

“Topaz” is a political thriller film directed by the master of suspense himself, Alfred Hitchcock.

The movie is based on the novel of the same name by Leon Uris and revolves around the espionage activities between the United States and Soviet Union during the Cold War era.

Hitchcock’s signature style is evident throughout the film with his clever use of camera angles and suspenseful music.

The plot is complex and multi-layered, with several subplots and twists that keep the audience engaged until the very end.

The performances by the cast are top-notch, particularly by Frederick Stafford, who plays the lead role of André Devereaux, a French intelligence agent.

The supporting cast including Dany Robin, John Vernon, and Roscoe Lee Browne also deliver solid performances.

One of the standout features of the film is the stunning cinematography by John F. Warren, which captures the beautiful landscapes of Europe and Cuba with precision and beauty.

While “Topaz” may not be considered one of Hitchcock’s best works, it still manages to entertain and thrill audiences with its intricate plot, superb performances, and beautiful visuals.

 

Topaz
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • John Forsythe, Frederick Stafford, Dany Robin (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Samuel Taylor (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Murder! (1930)

Murder! is a classic whodunit murder mystery that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, the film boasts a brilliant script, strong performances, and masterful cinematography.

The story revolves around a young actress, Diana Baring (Norah Baring), who is accused of murdering a fellow actress.

With seemingly irrefutable evidence against her, the only hope of proving her innocence rests on the shoulders of a young juror, Sir John Menier (Herbert Marshall). As the investigation unfolds, the plot thickens, and the list of suspects grows longer.

Hitchcock masterfully builds suspense and tension throughout the film, keeping the audience guessing until the very end.

The film’s climactic scene, set in a wax museum, is particularly thrilling and showcases Hitchcock’s trademark flair for visual storytelling.

The performances are top-notch, with Marshall delivering a standout performance as the determined juror.

The supporting cast also shines, with standout turns from Edward Chapman as the police inspector and Miles Mander as the enigmatic stage manager.

 

Murder!
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Herbert Marshall, Norah Baring (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Clarence Dane (Writer) - John Maxwell (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Secret Agent (1936)

Secret Agent is a classic spy thriller that delivers on all fronts.

With a cast led by the incomparable John Gielgud, this film is a masterclass in tension and intrigue.

The plot is both complex and gripping, with plenty of twists and turns to keep you guessing until the very end.

The cinematography is stunning, with the film’s European locations providing the perfect backdrop for the action.

The pacing is also spot-on, with the tension building steadily throughout the film until it reaches a satisfying conclusion.

One of the film’s standout elements is its use of humor.

Despite the serious subject matter, there are plenty of moments of levity that keep the film from becoming too heavy-handed.

Particularly memorable is the scene in which Gielgud’s character accidentally ends up in a ladies’ restroom.

 

The Secret Agent
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • John Gielgud, Madeleine Carroll, Robert Young (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Charles Bennett (Writer) - Michael Balcon (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Torn Curtain (1966)

Torn Curtain is a suspenseful thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat from beginning to end.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, the film stars Paul Newman and Julie Andrews in a tense and thrilling tale of espionage and betrayal.

The film’s plot revolves around Newman’s character, an American physicist who travels to East Germany to defect to the Soviet Union.

Andrews plays his fiancée, who becomes involved in the dangerous game of espionage as they attempt to outwit their captors and escape to freedom.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, as he ratchets up the tension with each passing scene.

The film’s stark black and white cinematography adds to the sense of unease and danger that permeates every moment of the story.

Newman and Andrews both give strong performances, with Newman’s character displaying a cool and calculating demeanor, while Andrews’ character struggles to keep up with the danger that surrounds them.

 

Torn Curtain
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Paul Newman, Julie Andrews, Lila Kedrova (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Brian Moore (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Paradine Case (1947)

“The Paradine Case” is a courtroom drama that’s more interested in the tangled relationships and complex emotions of its characters than in the legal proceedings themselves.

Gregory Peck stars as a lawyer who becomes enamored with his client, a beautiful woman accused of murdering her husband.

But as the case unfolds, it becomes clear that nothing is as it seems and the truth is far more complicated than anyone initially realized.

While the acting is top-notch (especially Alida Valli as the accused), the film’s pacing can be slow at times, and the courtroom scenes lack the tension and drama that other films in the genre deliver.

However, the film’s exploration of love, jealousy, and betrayal makes it a compelling and thought-provoking watch.

 

The Paradine Case
  • Gregory Peck, Ann Todd, Charles Laughton (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

The Man Who Knew Too Much is a suspenseful classic from the master of suspense himself, Alfred Hitchcock.

The film tells the story of a family on vacation in Switzerland who become embroiled in a web of espionage and murder when their young daughter is kidnapped.

The tension builds steadily throughout the film, as the parents against time to try and their child.

Hitchcock masterfully creates a sense of unease and uncertainty, using clever camera angles and suspenseful music to keep the audience on the edge of their seats.

The performances from the cast are also top-notch, with Peter Lorre delivering a standout performance as the sinister villain who holds the key to the family’s fate.

 

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Family Plot (1976)

Family Plot is one of Hitchcock’s final films and it’s a delightful blend of mystery, humor, and suspense. The film follows a clairvoyant and her boyfriend, who are hired by an elderly woman to help find her long-lost nephew.

However, things take a sinister turn when they realize that the nephew is actually a jewel thief and they become entangled in a dangerous game of cat and mouse.

The film boasts a standout cast, with Karen Black and Bruce Dern delivering standout performances as the quirky couple trying to solve the case.

The chemistry between the two leads is palpable, and their banter adds a touch of humor to the otherwise tense plot.

Hitchcock’s mastery of suspense is on full display in Family Plot, as he expertly builds tension through clever camera angles and tight editing.

The film also features some standout set pieces, including a thrilling car chase through the winding streets of San Francisco.

 

Family Plot
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Bruce Dern, Karen Black, Barbara Harris (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Ernest Lehman (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Young and Innocent (1937)

Young and Innocent is a Hitchcockian gem that often gets overlooked in favor of his more famous works.

This film follows Robert Tisdall (Derrick De Marney), a man falsely accused of murder who must clear his name with the help of Erica Burgoyne (Nova Pilbeam), the daughter of the local police chief.

While the plot may seem formulaic, Hitchcock’s direction and the chemistry between De Marney and Pilbeam elevate this film to something truly special.

The scene where Tisdall and Burgoyne evade the police while attending a political rally is a standout moment, showcasing Hitchcock’s signature tension-building techniques.

What’s also impressive is how well the film has aged. The themes of injustice and class struggle still resonate today, and the performances hold up remarkably well.

De Marney and Pilbeam’s banter is charming, and the supporting cast is pitch-perfect in their roles.

 

Young and Innocent
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Nova Pilbeam, Derrick De Marney, Percy Marmont (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Josephine Tey (Writer) - Edward Black (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Blackmail (1929)

Black is a tense and gripping thriller that showcases Alfred Hitchcock’s early mastery of suspense.

The film follows a young woman named Alice who becomes embroiled in a web of deceit and danger after she kills a man in self-defense.

From there, the film takes the audience on a thrilling ride as Alice tries to cover up her crime while also being blackmailed by a mysterious stranger.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, as he expertly builds tension and creates a sense of unease throughout the film.

The use of shadow and light is particularly effective, adding to the overall atmosphere of suspense.

The performances are also top-notch, with Anny Ondra delivering a standout performance as Alice.

While the film may feel dated by modern standards, it is still a must-see for any fan of Hitchcock or classic cinema.

Blackmail is a testament to the director’s early talent and a thrilling ride from start to finish.

Blackmail
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Anny Ondra, Sara Allgood, Charles Paton (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Charles Bennett (Writer) - John Maxwell (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Sabotage (1936)

Sabotage is a classic thriller film directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock.

The film tells the story of a woman who becomes embroiled in a terrorist plot against London.

The film is a tense and suspenseful ride from start to finish, with Hitchcock’s signature style of creating tension through the smallest details.

The performances in Sabotage are outstanding, with Sylvia Sidney delivering a standout performance as the innocent woman caught up in the terrorist plot.

She brings a sense of vulnerability and strength to the role, making the audience root for her throughout the film.

The cinematography in Sabotage is also top-notch, with Hitchcock using light and shadow to create a sense of unease and tension.

The scenes set in London are particularly striking, with the city itself becoming a character in the film.

The film’s climax is one of the most intense and memorable in Hitchcock’s career, with a bomb ticking down to detonation as the characters race against time to stop it.

It’s a masterclass in suspenseful filmmaking that will leave you on the edge of your seat.

 

Sabotage
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Sylvia Sidney, Oskar Homolka, John Loder (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - James Conrad (Writer) - Michael Balcon (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Trouble with Harry (1955)

“The Trouble with Harry” is a delightful black comedy that showcases the brilliant storytelling skills of Alfred Hitchcock.

Set against the picturesque backdrop of a small Vermont town, the film follows the quirky characters who stumble upon a dead body and become embroiled in a web of confusion and misadventures.

Hitchcock masterfully weaves together the seemingly unrelated lives of the townspeople, each with their own hidden secrets and desires, into a captivating and hilarious., charming performances, and visuals make for a thoroughly enjoyable viewing experience.

The film’s dark humor and clever twists keep the audience engaged throughout, while the stunning autumn scenery and beautiful score add to its overall charm.

“The Trouble with Harry” is a must-watch for fans of classic cinema and those who appreciate a good murder mystery with a comedic twist.

 

The Trouble with Harry
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Edmund Gwenn, John Forsythe, Shirley MacLaine (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - John Michael Hayes (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Stage Fright (1950)

“Stage Fright” is a thrilling and suspenseful film that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this movie tells the story of a struggling actress who becomes embroiled in a murder investigation.

The cast is superb, with standout performances from Marlene Dietrich and Jane Wyman.

The film is shot beautifully, with Hitchcock’s trademark camera angles and use of light and shadow creating a sense of tension and unease.

The script is tight and well-written, with plenty of twists and turns to keep you guessing.

 

Stage Fright
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Michael Wilding (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Whitfield Cook (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Saboteur (1942)

Saboteur is a thrilling and suspenseful film that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, the film follows the story of a man named Barry Kane (played by Robert Cummings) who is falsely accused of sabotage and must clear his name while on the run from the law.

The film is full of classic Hitchcockian twists and turns, with Kane encountering a cast of colorful characters along the way, including a blind man and a wealthy socialite.

The performances are top-notch, with Cummings delivering a strong and convincing portrayal of the wrongly accused Kane.

What really makes Saboteur stand out, however, is its use of iconic American landmarks as the backdrop for its action-packed chase scenes.

From the top of the Statue of Liberty to the depths of a coal mine, Hitchcock expertly weaves these locations into the story, adding a sense of awe and wonder to the already tense atmosphere.

 

Saboteur
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Robert Cummings, Priscilla Lane, Norman Lloyd (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Peter Viertel (Writer) - Frank Lloyd (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Marnie (1964)

Marnie is a thrilling psychological drama that explores the complex inner workings of a troubled young woman named Marnie, played brilliantly by Tippi Hedren.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this film is a masterclass in suspense and storytelling.

From the very beginning, the audience is drawn into Marnie’s mysterious world as she assumes various identities and steals from her employers.

But as the layers of her past are slowly peeled back, we begin to understand the trauma that has shaped her into the person she is today.

Hedren’s performance is mesmerizing, conveying both the vulnerability and the strength of her character with ease.

Sean Connery also shines as Mark Rutland, the wealthy businessman who becomes obsessed with uncovering Marnie’s secrets.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful as always, utilizing clever camera angles and editing techniques to build tension and keep the audience on the edge of their seats.

The score by Bernard Herrmann is also noteworthy, perfectly capturing the mood and tone of the film.

 

Marnie
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Tippi Hedren, Sean Connery, Diane Baker (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Winston Graham (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

I Confess (1953)

I Confess is a masterful Hitchcockian thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat from start to finish.

Starring Montgomery Clift as Father Michael Logan, a Catholic priest who hears the confession of a murderer and becomes a prime suspect in the investigation, the film explores themes of guilt, faith, and the power of secrets.

Clift delivers a haunting performance as the tortured priest, grappling with his own moral code and the weight of his position in the church.

Anne Baxter is also excellent as Ruth Grandfort, a former lover of Father Logan’s who becomes entangled in the murder investigation.

The chemistry between the two is palpable, and their scenes together are some of the film’s most intense.

Hitchcock’s direction is as masterful as ever, using his signature techniques to build tension and suspense throughout the film.

The use of light and shadow is particularly effective, creating a sense of unease that lingers long after the credits roll.

While I Confess may not be as well-known as some of Hitchcock’s other classics, it is a must-see for fans of the genre.

Gripping and thought-provoking, it’s a film that will stay with you long after you’ve watched it.

 

I Confess
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Montgomery Clift, Anne Baxter, Karl Malden (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - George Tabori (Writer) - Alfred Hitchcock (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1927)

“The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog” is a haunting and suspenseful silent film that perfectly captures the essence of early British cinema.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this film tells the story of a mysterious lodger who takes up residence in a boarding house in London during a time of heightened fear and paranoia surrounding a string of murders in the city.

Hitchcock’s use of light and shadow creates an eerie atmosphere throughout the film, leaving the audience on the edge of their seats as they try to uncover the identity of the killer.

The performances by the cast, particularly Ivor Novello as the lodger, are excellent and add to the tension and unease of the story.

The film’s themes of suspicion, fear, and the danger of mob mentality are as relevant today as they were in 1927.

“The Lodger” is a must-watch for any fan of Hitchcock, classic cinema, or anyone who appreciates a good mystery.

It’s a chilling and unforgettable film that will stay with you long after the credits roll.

 

The Lodger
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Marie Ault, Arthur Chesney, June (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Eliot Stannard (Writer) - Michael Balcon (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

Juno and the Paycock (1930)

Juno and the Paycock is a powerful and thought-provoking film that explores the devastating effects of poverty and war on a working-class family in Dublin.

Based on the play by Sean O’Casey, the film is a masterclass in storytelling, with director Alfred Hitchcock expertly capturing the complex emotions and struggles of the characters.

The film centers around Juno Boyle, played brilliantly by Sara Allgood, a strong-willed and resilient mother who is struggling to keep her family together amidst the chaos of the Irish Civil War.

Her husband, Captain Boyle, played by Edward Chapman, is a lazy and irresponsible man who spends his time drinking and avoiding work, much to Juno’s frustration.

As the story unfolds, we see Juno navigate the challenges of poverty, war, and family dysfunction with an unwavering strength and determination.

Allgood’s performance is a standout, conveying both the pain and the hope of the character with heart-wrenching authenticity.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, using a combination of close-ups and wide shots to convey the emotional depth of the story.

The film is a stark reminder of the human cost of war and poverty, and a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

 

Champagne (1928)

Champagne is a sparkling gem of a film that showcases director Alfred Hitchcock’s early mastery of the craft.

The film tells the story of a spoiled heiress named Betty, who learns the value of hard work and love when her father’s business goes bankrupt.

Hitchcock’s visual style is on full display here, with intricate camera movements and clever editing techniques that keep the audience engaged from start to finish.

The film’s use of humor is also impressive, as Betty’s antics and the absurd situations she finds herself in will have you laughing out loud.

The performances are top-notch, with Betty Balfour delivering a charming and nuanced portrayal of Betty.

The supporting cast is equally impressive, with Gordon Harker as Betty’s father and Jean Bradin as the charming love interest.

 

Champagne
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Betty Balfour, Jean Bradin, Ferdinand von Alten (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Alfred Hitchcock (Writer) - John Maxwell (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Easy Virtue (1927)

Easy Virtue is a stunning silent film that explores the themes of love, betrayal, and societal expectations in a captivating and thought-provoking way.

Based on the play by Noël Coward, this film adaptation directed by Alfred Hitchcock is a testament to the genius of both the playwright and the filmmaker.

The film follows the story of Larita Filton (Isabel Jeans), a glamorous and successful woman who is accused of having an affair and subsequently divorces her husband.

She decides to leave England and start a new life in the south of France, where she meets and falls in love with John Whittaker (Robin Irvine), a young and innocent man from a wealthy family. However, their relationship is threatened by the disapproval of John’s mother and his ex-fiancée.

The performances in this film are outstanding, particularly Isabel Jeans, who portrays Larita with a perfect balance of strength and vulnerability.

The cinematography is also breathtaking, showcasing Hitchcock’s early mastery of visual storytelling.

The use of close-ups and shadows adds to the film’s emotional depth and intensity.

Easy Virtue is a remarkable film that remains relevant and compelling almost a century after its release.

It is a must-watch for any lover of classic cinema and a true testament to the power of storytelling.

Easy Virtue (1928) [ Blu-Ray, Reg.A/B/C Import - Spain ]
  • Easy Virtue (1928)
  • Easy Virtue (1928)
  • Isabel Jeans, Franklin Dyall, Eric Bransby Williams (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Easy Virtue (1928) (Producer)
  • Spanish (Subtitle)

Number 17 (1932)

“Number 17” is a Hitchcockian thriller that may not be as well-known as some of the director’s later works, but it certainly deserves a spot among his classics.

The plot follows a group of strangers who find themselves trapped in a house that may or may not be haunted, with a stolen necklace and a murderer on the loose.

The suspense is palpable from the very beginning, with twists and turns that keep you guessing until the very end.

The film’s visual style is also worth noting, with Hitchcock’s signature use of shadows and camera angles adding to the eerie atmosphere.

The cast, led by Leon M. Lion and Anne Grey, delivers solid performances, and the score by Louis Levy adds to the tension. Overall, “Number 17” is a must-watch for Hitchcock fans and lovers of classic thrillers alike.

 

Number 17
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Leon M. Lion, Anne Grey, John Stuart (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Joseph Jefferson Farjeon (J. Jefferson Farjeon) (Writer) - Leon M....
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

The Skin Game (1931)

“The Skin Game” is a gripping drama that explores the themes of class, greed, and morality.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this film tells the story of a wealthy family who is determined to acquire a piece of land owned by a poor family.

As the two families clash, tensions rise and secrets are revealed, leading to a dramatic and unexpected conclusion.

The performances in this film are outstanding, with Edmund Gwenn delivering a standout performance as the patriarch of the poor family, and Jill Esmond and John Longden delivering strong performances as the wealthy couple.

Hitchcock’s direction is masterful, building tension and suspense throughout the film and delivering a powerful message about the dangers of greed and the importance of morality.

 

The Skin Game
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • C.V. France, Helen Haye, Jill Esmond (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - John Galsworthy (Writer) - John Maxwell (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

East of Shanghai (1931)

East of Shanghai is a classic early talkie that packs a punch with its intricate plot and strong performances.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock’s frequent collaborator, Henry Edwards, the film follows a group of British expats as they navigate the treacherous waters of love, money, and betrayal in the Far East.

The standout performance comes from Henry Kendall as the charming and conniving Sir Basil Winterton, whose sleazy antics drive the plot forward.

The supporting cast also delivers strong performances, particularly Elsa Lanchester as the sassy and independent Lydia, and Gibb McLaughlin as the lovelorn but naive Tom.

While the film’s pacing can be slow at times, it’s worth sticking around for the thrilling finale that will leave you on the edge of your seat.

The stunning cinematography captures the beauty and intrigue of Shanghai, and the score adds to the tension and drama of the story.

 

Rich and Strange
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Henry Kendall, Joan Barry, Percy Marmont (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Alfred Hitchcock (Writer) - John Maxwell (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)

The Farmer’s Wife (1928)

The Farmer’s Wife is a charming silent film that tells the story of a widowed farmer who decides to remarry and sets out to find a suitable bride.

The film is directed by the legendary British filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock and features stunning cinematography that captures the beauty of the English countryside.

The performances of the cast are exceptional, especially that of the lead actor Jameson Thomas who portrays the farmer with such sincerity and warmth that it’s impossible not to root for him.

The supporting cast also shines, with notable performances from Lillian Hall-Davis and Gordon Harker, who bring a lot of humor and heart to the story.

The film’s screenplay is witty, with clever dialogue and well-crafted characters that feel authentic and relatable.

The pacing of the film is just right, making for an enjoyable watch from start to finish.

The Farmer's Wife (Silent)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Jameson Thomas, Lillian Hall-Davis (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Alfred Hitchcock (Writer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Pleasure Garden (1925)

The Pleasure Garden is a mesmerizing film that transports the viewer back in time to the early days of cinema.

Directed by the legendary Alfred Hitchcock, this silent film is a beautiful example of the director’s early work.

The story follows two dancers who become friends while performing in a London theater.

One of the dancers, Patsy Brand (Virginia Valli), falls in love with a wealthy man named Levett (Miles Mander) and they get married.

However, their marriage is tainted by Levett’s dark secrets and Patsy’s former lover, Jill (Carmelita Geraghty), who is determined to win her back.

The film is a feast for the eyes, with stunning cinematography that captures the beauty of both the theater and the Swiss Alps.

The performances are also top-notch, particularly Valli’s portrayal of Patsy, who is both vulnerable and strong-willed.

While the film is not as well-known as some of Hitchcock’s later works, it is a must-see for fans of the director and silent cinema.

The Pleasure Garden is a true gem that showcases Hitchcock’s early talent and sets the stage for his future masterpieces.

 

THE PLEASURE GARDEN - MOVIE [DVD] [1925]
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

The Manxman (1929)

The Manxman is a captivating melodrama that showcases Hitchcock’s early mastery of the art of suspense.

Set in the scenic Isle of Man, the film tells the story of two childhood friends, Kate and Pete, who fall in love despite their class differences.

However, their romance is threatened by the arrival of a wealthy lawyer who also becomes smitten with Kate.

The film’s pacing is deliberate, allowing the audience to become fully invested in the characters and their relationships.

The stunning cinematography captures the beauty of the Isle of Man and adds depth to the emotional turmoil of the characters.

The performances are top-notch, with Anny Ondra delivering a standout performance as the conflicted Kate.

What makes The Manxman a standout film is its exploration of themes that were ahead of its time, such as social inequality and the struggle between duty and desire.

Hitchcock’s skilled direction keeps the tension high, even in the film’s quieter moments.

 

The Manxman – Digitally Remastered
  • Anny Ondra, Carl Brisson, Malcolm Keen (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director)

When Boys Leave Home (1927)

When Boys Leave Home is a charming and delightful coming-of-age story that captures the essence of youthful exuberance and the challenges of growing up.

The film follows the adventures of a group of boys who leave their homes to seek their fortune in the big city, only to discover that life is not always easy.

Director Alfred Hitchcock’s early work shines in this film, with his signature style of suspense and intrigue evident throughout.

The cinematography is also impressive, with beautiful shots of the English countryside and the bustling city streets.

One of the standout performances in the film comes from Ivor Novello, who portrays the charismatic and adventurous lead character.

His portrayal is both nuanced and captivating, making it easy to root for him throughout his journey.

Waltzes from Vienna (1934)

“Waltzes from Vienna” is a charming musical comedy that transports the audience to 19th century Vienna, the hub of the waltz.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, the film follows the story of Johann Strauss II, the King of Waltz, as he navigates his personal and professional life, all while trying to create a new waltz that will take the world by storm.

The film features an excellent cast, with Jessie Matthews giving a standout performance as Rasi, Johann’s love interest.

The chemistry between Matthews and Esmond Knight, who plays Johann, is palpable and adds to the charm of the film.

The musical numbers are the highlight of the film, with catchy tunes and beautiful choreography that will have you tapping your feet and humming along.

The waltz scenes are particularly stunning, with the camera capturing the dancers in beautiful, sweeping shots.

While not as well-known as some of Hitchcock’s later works, “Waltzes from Vienna” is a delightful film that perfectly captures the spirit of Vienna and the joy of waltzing.

 

The Ring (1927)

“The Ring” is a classic silent film that tells the story of a love triangle between a boxer, his girlfriend, and a seductive circus performer.

The film is a stunning example of the artistry and technical skill of silent cinema, with beautifully composed shots and a haunting score that perfectly captures the tension and drama of the story.

The performances are also top-notch, with Carl Brisson delivering a powerful portrayal of the boxer who struggles to choose between his two loves.

Lillian Hall-Davis is equally impressive as the girlfriend who longs for his affection, while Ian Hunter adds depth and complexity to the role of the rival.

 

Ring (English Subtitled)
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Carl Brisson, Lillian Hall-Davis, Ian Hunter (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Alfred Hitchcock (Writer) - John Maxwell (Producer)
  • (Playback Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Under Capricorn (1949)

Under Capricorn is a sweeping period drama from the legendary filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock.

Set in 1830s Australia, the film follows the story of a troubled woman named Lady Henrietta (Ingrid Bergman) who is trying to overcome her troubled past and find redemption in a new land.

The cinematography is stunning, with lush landscapes and sweeping vistas that transport the viewer to a different time and place.

The performances are equally impressive, with Bergman delivering a nuanced emotional portrayal of woman to find her place in a new world.

Joseph Cotten also shines as the charming and enigmatic Charles Adare, who becomes entangled in Lady Henrietta’s story.

While the film may not be as well-known as some of Hitchcock’s other works, it is still a masterclass in storytelling and a must-see for fans of classic cinema.

 

Sale
Under Capricorn [Blu-ray]
  • Shrink-wrapped
  • Ingrid Bergman, Joseph Cotten (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

Jamaica Inn (1939)

Jamaica Inn is a classic Hitchcock thriller that takes viewers on a wild ride through the treacherous world of smugglers and pirates.

The film follows the story of Mary Yellan, a young woman who arrives at the Jamaica Inn to live with her aunt, only to discover that the inn’s owners are involved in a dangerous smuggling ring.

The film boasts impressive cinematography, with stunning shots of the rugged Cornish coastline and the eerie, mist-shrouded inn.

Hitchcock’s signature suspenseful style is on full display, with tense chase scenes and heart-pounding moments of danger.

The standout performance comes from Charles Laughton, who plays the cunning and malevolent Sir Humphrey Pengallan with chilling precision.

Maureen O’Hara is also excellent as Mary, conveying both vulnerability and strength in equal measure.

While the film has its share of flaws, including some uneven pacing and a few underdeveloped characters, it’s a must-see for fans of classic cinema and Hitchcock aficionados.

Jamaica Inn is a gripping, atmospheric thriller that showcases the talents of one of cinema’s greatest directors.

 

Jamaica Inn
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Charles Laughton, Robert Newton, Maureen O'Hara (Actors)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (Director) - Daphne DuMaurier (Writer) - Charles Laughton (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

The Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies – Wrapping Up

So there you have it. The top Alfred Hitchcock films. As you can see, he’s been responsible for some classics of cinema history and it’s clear to see why he’s considered one of the all-time greats.

If you’re sitting down to watch one of these tonight, we envy you. You’re in for a real treat!

We hope this list of the best Alfred Hitchcock movies has been helpful. Did we miss your favorite? Let us know in the comments section.
 

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