Apichatpong Weerasethakul is a Thai filmmaker and visual artist known for his distinctive and highly original films that explore the intersection of memory, history, and myth. Here are some of his best films:

“Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives” (2010) – This Palme d’Or-winning film tells the story of an old man who is visited by the ghosts of his past, including his wife and son.

The film is a surreal and meditative exploration of memory, mortality, and the cycle of life and death.

“Syndromes and a Century” (2006) – This experimental film is divided into two parts, each set in a different hospital in Thailand and exploring the lives of the doctors who work there.

“Tropical Malady” (2004) – This film is divided into two distinct parts: the first is a romantic story between a soldier and a country boy, while the second is a mystical tale of a shapeshifting tiger that haunts the jungle.

“Blissfully Yours” (2002) – This film tells the story of a young couple who take a day trip to the countryside to escape the pressures of modern life.

The film is a slow and sensual exploration of nature, desire, and the fleeting nature of happiness.

“Cemetery of Splendour” (2015) – This film tells the story of a group of soldiers who fall into a deep sleep and are tended to by a group of caretakers.

The film is a poetic and dreamlike exploration of memory, history, and the intersection of the spiritual and the physical.

Best Apichatpong Weerasethakul Films

Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s films are known for their distinctive visual style, meditative pacing, and exploration of complex themes.

His films invite viewers to engage with the mysteries of memory, history, and identity in a way that is both challenging and rewarding.

1. Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010)

“Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives” is a 2010 Thai film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

The film won the Palme d’Or at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival and is known for its surreal and dreamlike narrative, blending elements of fantasy, folklore, and magical realism.

The film follows the story of Uncle Boonmee, a man who is suffering from a kidney disease and who retreats to the countryside to spend his final days with his family.

   

As he nears death, he is visited by the ghosts of his past lives, who offer him guidance and comfort in his final moments.

The film explores themes of life, death, reincarnation, and the interconnectedness of all things.

“Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives” is notable for its innovative and unconventional storytelling, its striking visuals, and its use of sound and music to create a dreamlike atmosphere.

The film is considered a masterpiece of contemporary Thai cinema and is widely regarded as one of the best films of the 21st century.

Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives
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  • Thanapat Saisaymar, Jenjira Pongpas, Sakda Kaewbuadee (Actors)
  • Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Director) - Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Writer) - Apichatpong...
  • English (Playback Language)
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2. Tropical Malady (2004)

“Tropical Malady” is a 2004 Thai film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul. The film is a poetic exploration of human desire, spirituality, and the animal kingdom.

It’s divided into two distinct sections: the first part is a love story between a soldier named Keng and a country boy named Tong, while the second part takes on a more mystical and surreal tone.

In the first part, Keng and Tong fall in love while on a military mission in the Thai countryside.

Their love story is presented in a naturalistic and understated way, highlighting the beauty of the landscape and the intimacy of their relationship.

The second part of the film takes a more abstract approach, with Keng wandering through the jungle in search of a creature believed to be a shapeshifting spirit.

The film blurs the line between reality and fantasy, exploring themes of transformation, transgression, and the fluidity of identity.

“Tropical Malady” was a critical success, winning the Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004.

The film was praised for its experimental approach to storytelling, its lyrical and dreamlike visuals, and its exploration of cultural and spiritual themes.

Apichatpong Weerasethakul has since become one of Thailand’s most celebrated filmmakers, known for his poetic and contemplative approach to cinema.

Tropical Malady (Sud Pralad) [2004] [DVD] [UK Import]
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3. Syndromes and a Century (2006)

“Syndromes and a Century” is a 2006 Thai film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul. The film is a meditation on memory, identity, and the relationship between doctor and patient, as well as on the changing landscape of Thailand.

   

One of the unique features of the film is its structure. The film is divided into two parts, with each part presenting a different version of events.

The first half is set in a rural hospital, while the second half takes place in an urban setting.

The film’s structure challenges the viewer to question the reliability of memory and the subjective nature of truth.

Another notable feature of the film is its use of non-professional actors. Weerasethakul cast real-life doctors and medical professionals in the roles of the doctors and nurses in the film.

This adds a level of authenticity to the film, as well as blurring the lines between documentary and fiction.

The film is also known for its use of long takes and static shots, which give the viewer time to contemplate the themes and emotions of the film.

Weerasethakul often frames his characters in wide shots, emphasizing the environment and the space around them, as well as creating a sense of stillness and quiet.

“Syndromes and a Century” is a thought-provoking and unconventional film that challenges the viewer’s perceptions of reality and memory.

Its meditative pacing and non-traditional structure create a dreamlike atmosphere that is both introspective and emotionally resonant.

   

4. Cemetery of Splendor (2015)

“Cemetery of Splendor” is a 2015 Thai drama film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul. The film tells the story of a group of soldiers who have been struck with a mysterious sleeping sickness while stationed in a rural hospital.

The film follows Jenjira, a volunteer at the hospital who begins to develop a close relationship with one of the sleeping soldiers.

One of the strengths of “Cemetery of Splendor” is its dreamlike and hypnotic atmosphere, which is enhanced by Weerasethakul’s use of surreal imagery, slow pacing, and a haunting score.

The film also features stunning visuals of the Thai countryside, which serve as a contrast to the hospital setting.

At its core, “Cemetery of Splendor” is a meditation on memory, history, and spirituality, and it is not always easy to decipher the meaning behind the film’s many metaphors and symbols.

However, for those willing to immerse themselves in its unique and otherworldly universe, “Cemetery of Splendor” offers a deeply moving and thought-provoking experience.

The film was received positively by critics and won several awards at international film festivals, including the Jury Prize at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

It is regarded as one of the best films to come out of Thailand in recent years, and it further cements Weerasethakul’s reputation as one of the most innovative and visionary filmmakers working today.

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5. Blissfully Yours (2002)

“Blissfully Yours” is a 2002 Thai film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul. The film tells the story of a young couple, Min and Roong, who leave the city for a day trip to the countryside with Roong’s nephew.

They spend the day picnicking, swimming, and relaxing in the idyllic natural setting, while also dealing with personal issues and relationships.

The film is known for its slow pace, minimalist style, and poetic exploration of nature and human desire.

It was shot on location in the lush forests of Thailand, and features long, contemplative shots of the natural surroundings and the characters’ interactions within them.

The film’s sensual and dreamlike quality invites the viewer to share in the characters’ experiences and emotions, and to reflect on the nature of love, desire, and freedom.

“Blissfully Yours” received critical acclaim upon its release, and won the Un Certain Regard prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 2002.

It’s considered one of the key films of the Thai New Wave movement, which emerged in the late 1990s and early 2000s and challenged conventional Thai cinema with its experimental, personal, and socially engaged films.

Sud sanaeha Aka Blissfully Yours Dvd Uncut Region 2 Pal
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  • Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Director) - Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Writer) - Charles de Meaux...
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

6. Mysterious Object at Noon (2000)

“Mysterious Object at Noon” is a 2000 experimental documentary film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

The film is part documentary and part fiction, as it tells the story of a woman traveling through Thailand and collecting stories from various people she meets along the way.

The film is known for its unconventional narrative structure, which blends documentary footage with fictional reenactments and improvisation.

The stories told by the various characters are often strange and surreal, incorporating elements of fantasy and myth.

The film’s style and approach to storytelling is heavily influenced by the concept of “exquisite corpse,” a game in which a group of people collaborate to create a story or drawing, with each person contributing a piece without seeing what the others have done.

In “Mysterious Object at Noon,” the woman’s journey through Thailand serves as a kind of frame story for the various stories she collects from the people she meets.

The film’s blend of documentary and fiction creates a sense of ambiguity and uncertainty, blurring the lines between reality and fantasy.

Overall, “Mysterious Object at Noon” is a unique and thought-provoking film that challenges traditional notions of narrative and documentary filmmaking.

The film’s use of the “exquisite corpse” technique and its unconventional approach to storytelling creates a sense of mystery and wonder that is both engaging and unsettling.

Mysterious Object at Noon [DVD]
  • Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Director)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

7. Mekong Hotel (2012)

“Mekong Hotel” is a 2012 Thai film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

The film is set in a hotel located along the Mekong River, which forms a natural border between Thailand and Laos, and tells a series of interconnected stories that explore themes of memory, history, and cultural identity.

The film is shot in a naturalistic and minimalist style, and features a mix of documentary and fictional elements.

It incorporates traditional Thai music and folklore, and includes scenes of local villagers discussing their experiences of living near the river.

“Mekong Hotel” premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2012, where it was well-received by critics.

The film is notable for its poetic and meditative approach to storytelling, and for its ability to capture the essence of a specific time and place in Southeast Asia.

It’s considered one of Weerasethakul’s most personal and contemplative works and has been praised for its haunting beauty and evocative power.

Mekong Hotel
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  • French (Subtitle)
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8. The Adventures of Iron Pussy (2003)

“The Adventures of Iron Pussy” is a 2003 Thai comedy film directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul and Michael Shaowanasai, who also stars in the lead role as the titular character.

The film is a playful and irreverent parody of Thai action films, musicals, and spy thrillers.

The film follows Iron Pussy, a retired secret agent who is called back into action to stop a villainous plot to steal the Thai royal jewels.

Along the way, she encounters a variety of eccentric characters, including a drag queen and a British spy, and sings several musical numbers.

“The Adventures of Iron Pussy” was notable for its use of campy humor, over-the-top action sequences, and tongue-in-cheek nods to Thai popular culture.

The film was well-received by critics for its subversive take on genre conventions and its celebration of queer and outsider identities.

It has since become a cult favorite in Thailand and on the international film festival circuit.

3 Characteristics of Apichatpong Weerasethakul Films

Apichatpong Weerasethakul is a Thai filmmaker known for his distinctive style and unique approach to storytelling. Here are three characteristics of his films:

Experimental Narratives

Weerasethakul’s films often employ non-linear and experimental storytelling techniques. He often weaves multiple storylines together, blurring the boundaries between reality and imagination, memory and dream.

His films are characterized by a meditative, slow-paced approach that encourages the viewer to contemplate the deeper themes and emotions of the film.

Connection to Nature and Thai Culture

Weerasethakul’s films often explore the relationship between humans and nature, as well as the rich cultural heritage of Thailand.

He frequently sets his films in rural or natural settings and incorporates traditional Thai practices, music, and spirituality into his work.

Use of Surrealism and Magical Realism

Weerasethakul’s films often incorporate elements of surrealism and magical realism. His films often feature supernatural or dreamlike sequences that blur the lines between reality and fantasy.

He’s also known for his use of long takes, static shots, and natural soundscapes to create a sense of stillness and quiet that allows the viewer to immerse themselves in the film’s world.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch Apichatpong Weerasethakul Films

Apichatpong Weerasethakul is a Thai filmmaker known for his surreal and poetic style, blending elements of Thai mythology, political commentary, and personal memoir.

Here are three reasons why you should watch Apichatpong Weerasethakul films:

Unique Cinematic Vision

Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s films are visually stunning and feature a unique blend of dreamlike imagery, unconventional storytelling, and subtle social commentary.

His films often incorporate elements of Thai folklore and mysticism, creating a world that is both familiar and surreal.

Exploration Of Personal And Cultural Identity

Many of Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s films explore themes of personal and cultural identity, often drawing on his own experiences growing up in Thailand.

By examining the intersections between individual and collective identity, his films offer a deep and nuanced exploration of the human condition.

Critical Acclaim

Apichatpong Weerasethakul has received widespread critical acclaim for his films, winning numerous awards at international film festivals, including the Palme d’Or at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival for “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives.”

He is widely regarded as one of the most innovative and visionary filmmakers working today, and his films offer a unique perspective on contemporary cinema and the world at large.

Best Apichatpong Weerasethakul Films – Wrapping Up

Apichatpong Weerasethakul is a Thai filmmaker who has gained international acclaim for his poetic and experimental films that often explore the intersection of memory, mythology, and politics.

Here are some of his most notable works:

“Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives” (2010) – This film won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and is widely considered Weerasethakul’s masterpiece. It tells the story of an aging man who is visited by the spirits of his past lives.

“Syndromes and a Century” (2006) – This film is a meditation on memory and features two parallel storylines, one set in a rural clinic and the other in an urban hospital.

“Tropical Malady” (2004) – This film is a love story that takes a surreal turn when the main character is transformed into a tiger.

“Blissfully Yours” (2002) – This film is a slow-paced exploration of desire and nature.

“Cemetery of Splendour” (2015) – This film is a meditation on memory and sleep, set in a hospital where soldiers suffering from a mysterious sleeping illness are being treated.

Weerasethakul’s films are known for their dreamlike quality, unconventional narratives, and use of natural settings.

His work often blurs the line between reality and fiction, and draws on elements of traditional Thai culture and mythology.

Weerasethakul’s films are highly regarded for their originality, beauty, and thought-provoking content.