Claude Chabrol was a French film director and one of the founders of the French New Wave movement.

He was known for his psychological thrillers and darkly comic explorations of human behavior, often drawing inspiration from the work of Alfred Hitchcock.

Chabrol’s films often explore themes of class, gender, and power, and feature complex and morally ambiguous characters.

His innovative storytelling techniques and use of irony and black humor have made him a significant figure in the history of French cinema.

Best Claude Chabrol Films

Here are some of Claude Chabrol’s best films:

1. This Man Must Die (1969)

“This Man Must Die” is a French thriller film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1969. The film tells the story of a man named Charles, who seeks revenge on the hit-and-run driver who killed his young son in a small village in rural France.

As Charles begins to investigate the identity of the driver, he becomes embroiled in a web of secrets and lies in the village, which ultimately leads him to discover the shocking truth about the person responsible for his son’s death.

The film is notable for its exploration of themes such as revenge, justice, and the moral complexities of vigilantism.

It also features a tense and suspenseful narrative that keeps the audience on the edge of their seats, as well as strong performances from the cast, including Michel Duchaussoy in the lead role of Charles.

Chabrol’s direction is restrained and calculated, heightening the tension and building towards the film’s climactic finale.

The film also features beautiful cinematography and a haunting score, which add to the film’s ominous atmosphere.

Overall, “This Man Must Die” is a powerful and thought-provoking thriller that explores complex themes of morality and justice. It is a classic of French cinema and a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a director.

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2. La Cérémonie (1995)

“La Cérémonie” is a 1995 French film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film is based on the 1947 novel “A Judgment in Stone” by Ruth Rendell.

The film tells the story of Sophie, a quiet and reserved young woman who is hired as a maid for a wealthy family in a small French town. Sophie forms a close bond with Jeanne, a postal worker who is struggling to make ends meet.

As the two women’s friendship grows, they become increasingly drawn to each other, and their relationship takes a dark and dangerous turn.

The film is notable for its masterful use of suspense and tension, as well as its powerful exploration of class conflict and social injustice.

   

The film’s cast, which includes Isabelle Huppert, Sandrine Bonnaire, and Jacqueline Bisset, delivers powerful and nuanced performances that bring the complex characters to life.

Overall, “La Cérémonie” is a haunting and powerful film that explores the darkest corners of the human psyche.

The film is a thought-provoking meditation on the nature of evil, and the complex ways in which it manifests in the world. The film is a must-see for fans of psychological thrillers and character-driven dramas.

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3. Le Boucher (1970)

“Le Boucher” is a 1970 French psychological thriller film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film tells the story of a small-town schoolteacher named Hélène (played by Stéphane Audran) who becomes romantically involved with a local butcher named Popaul (played by Jean Yanne), who is suspected of being a serial killer.

As their relationship deepens, Hélène becomes increasingly conflicted about her feelings for Popaul and her suspicions about his involvement in the murders.

The film is notable for its exploration of themes such as love, obsession, and violence, as well as its examination of the tensions between urban and rural communities.

Chabrol’s direction is subtle and nuanced, with a focus on character development and psychological depth. The film also features a standout performance by Stéphane Audran, who captures the emotional complexity of her character and the sense of isolation and vulnerability that she experiences as she becomes entangled in Popaul’s world.

“Le Boucher” is a masterful example of French cinema, with its subtle pacing, intricate character development, and psychological depth.

The film is a tense and suspenseful thriller that explores complex and universal themes, and it stands as a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a director and his ability to craft compelling and thought-provoking narratives.

   

Le Boucher
  • Stphane Audran, Jean Yanne, Antonio Passalia (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Claude Chabrol (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

4. Les Biches (1968)

“Les Biches” is a 1968 French film directed by Claude Chabrol, and starring Stéphane Audran, Jean-Louis Trintignant, and Jacqueline Sassard.

The film is a psychological drama that explores the complex relationships between a wealthy and mysterious woman, a young and beautiful drifter, and a wealthy architect who becomes involved with both of them.

The film is known for its stylish and sophisticated atmosphere, as well as its exploration of themes such as desire, jealousy, and power.

It features a striking visual style, with vivid colors and elegant set design, which contribute to its dreamlike quality. The film was praised for its complex and nuanced characters, as well as its sensitive portrayal of unconventional relationships.

“Les Biches” is considered one of Chabrol’s most important films, and has been cited as a key work of the French New Wave movement. It is a sophisticated and sensual exploration of human desire and power, and has been praised for its visual elegance and emotional depth.

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Les Biches
  • Jean-Louis Trintignant, Jacqueline Sassard, Stphane Audran (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Claude Chabrol (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

5. La femme infidèle (1969)

“La Femme Infidèle” is a French film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1969. The film tells the story of a man named Charles who becomes suspicious of his wife’s infidelity and begins to investigate her actions.

   

As Charles delves deeper into his wife’s secret life, he becomes increasingly obsessed and vengeful. The film explores themes of jealousy, desire, and the breakdown of trust in a marriage.

“La Femme Infidèle” features strong performances by actors Stéphane Audran and Michel Bouquet, and is known for its stylish direction and suspenseful storytelling.

The film was particularly notable for its twist ending, which surprised many viewers at the time of its release.

The film was well-received by critics and is considered one of Chabrol’s best works. It has been praised for its exploration of the complexities of human relationships and its nuanced characterizations.

“La Femme Infidèle” is also notable for its influence on the genre of French psychological thrillers, which Chabrol would continue to explore throughout his career.

La Femme infidèle
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

6. The Cousins (1959)

“The Cousins” (Les Cousins) is a French drama film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1959. The film tells the story of two cousins, the sophisticated and wealthy Paul and the rustic and bohemian Charles, who reunite in Paris and become roommates as they attend university.

As they navigate the world of Parisian high society, the cousins’ personalities and values clash, and they both become involved in romantic entanglements that threaten to damage their relationship.

The film is notable for its exploration of class differences and the tension between urban and rural values, as well as for its depiction of the decadence and ennui of French bourgeois society in the late 1950s. It also features a strong ensemble cast, including Gérard Blain and Jean-Claude Brialy as the two cousins.

Chabrol’s direction is elegant and understated, allowing the story and characters to unfold in a natural and unforced way. The film also features beautiful black-and-white cinematography and a memorable score by Paul Misraki.

Overall, “The Cousins” is a classic of French New Wave cinema, and a landmark in the career of Chabrol. It is a nuanced and insightful exploration of social class and cultural identity, and a must-see for fans of French cinema.

The Cousins (1959) ( Les Cousins ) (Blu-Ray)
  • The Cousins (1959) ( Les Cousins )
  • The Cousins (1959)
  • Les Cousins
  • Jean-Claude Brialy, Stphane Audran, Grard Blain (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - The Cousins (1959) ( Les Cousins ) (Producer)

7. Story of Women (1988)

“Story of Women” is a 1988 French film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film tells the story of Marie, a housewife living in Nazi-occupied France during World War II.

When her husband is captured by the Germans and sent to a concentration camp, Marie is left to care for her children alone. Desperate to provide for her family, Marie begins performing abortions for local women, despite the danger and illegality of the practice.

The film is notable for its exploration of gender roles and social norms, as well as its powerful indictment of the patriarchy and the ways in which it oppresses and silences women.

The film’s cast, which includes Isabelle Huppert, François Cluzet, and Nils Tavernier, delivers powerful and nuanced performances that bring the complex characters to life.

“Story of Women” is a searing and emotionally resonant film that explores the darkest corners of the human experience.

The film is a testament to the power of human resilience and the strength of the human spirit in the face of overwhelming adversity. The film is a must-see for fans of historical dramas and character-driven narratives.

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Story of Women [DVD]
  • Isabelle Huppert, Franois Cluzet, Nils Tavernier (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Claude Chabrol (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

   

8. Violette (1978)

“Violette” is a 1978 French drama film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film tells the story of a young woman named Violette Nozière (played by Isabelle Huppert), who is arrested for poisoning her parents.

The film is based on a true story that took place in Paris in the 1930s and explores the complex relationships between Violette, her parents, and the society in which she lives.

The film is notable for its examination of the themes of love, family, and social inequality. Chabrol’s direction is subtle and nuanced, with a focus on character development and the psychological complexity of the protagonist.

Isabelle Huppert delivers a powerful performance as Violette, capturing the conflicting emotions and motivations of the character and the sense of isolation and desperation that she experiences as she navigates the social pressures and constraints of her environment.

“Violette” is a powerful and thought-provoking film that examines complex and universal themes with depth and nuance.

It stands as a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a director and his ability to craft compelling and emotionally resonant narratives. The film is an essential watch for fans of French cinema and those interested in exploring the complexities of human behavior and social dynamics.

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Violette Noziere (1978) (Original French ONLY Version - No English Optiosn)
  • Isabelle Huppert, Stéphane Audran, Jean Carmet (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director)

9. Nightcap (2000)

“Nightcap” is a 2000 film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film is a thriller that centers around the murder of a young woman, who was found dead in her apartment. The prime suspect is a man who had been seen leaving her apartment building on the night of the murder.

The film follows the investigation into the murder, as the police try to piece together what happened and who is responsible. As the investigation progresses, it becomes clear that everyone involved has something to hide, and the line between victim and perpetrator begins to blur.

“Nightcap” is a tense and gripping thriller that keeps the viewer on the edge of their seat. Chabrol’s direction is masterful, with a careful balance of suspense and character development. The film’s pacing is excellent, with a gradual increase in tension that builds to a thrilling conclusion.

Overall, “Nightcap” is a must-see for fans of the thriller genre, and a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a filmmaker.

   

10. Alice or The Last Escapade (1977)

“Alice or The Last Escapade” is a 1977 French film directed by Claude Chabrol, and starring Sylvia Kristel, Charles Vanel, and André Dussollier.

The film is a surreal and dreamlike exploration of the life of Alice, a wealthy and beautiful woman who becomes embroiled in a mysterious and unsettling world of espionage, murder, and intrigue.

The film is known for its highly stylized and theatrical atmosphere, as well as its exploration of themes such as identity, memory, and the nature of reality.

It features a striking visual style, with vivid colors and unusual camera angles, which contribute to its otherworldly quality. The film was praised for its imaginative and original approach to storytelling, as well as its nuanced and complex characters.

“Alice or The Last Escapade” is considered one of Chabrol’s most ambitious and inventive films, and has been cited as an important work of French surrealism.

It is a deeply personal and idiosyncratic exploration of the human psyche, and has been praised for its daring and unconventional approach to filmmaking.

Alice, or The Last Escapade (Alice Ou La Dernière Fugue) [DVD]
  • Sylvia Kristel, Charles Vanel, Ferdinand Ledoux (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

11. Just Before Nightfall (1971)

“Just Before Nightfall” (original title: “Juste avant la nuit”) is a French film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1971. The film tells the story of Charles Masson, a successful businessman who is having an affair with his wife’s best friend.

When his lover is murdered, Charles becomes the prime suspect and must navigate a web of deceit and infidelity to clear his name.

The film explores themes of morality, guilt, and the consequences of infidelity. It features strong performances by actors Michel Bouquet and Stéphane Audran, who would go on to collaborate with Chabrol on several other films.

“Just Before Nightfall” is known for its stylish direction and suspenseful storytelling, as well as its portrayal of the seedy underbelly of bourgeois society. The film was well-received by critics and is considered one of Chabrol’s best works.

It has been praised for its complex characters and nuanced exploration of human relationships, as well as its use of irony and black humor.

“Just Before Nightfall” is notable for its influence on the genre of French psychological thrillers, which Chabrol would continue to explore throughout his career. The film was remade in 1995 as “The Color of Lies,” also directed by Chabrol.

Just Before Nightfall (1971) ( Juste avante la nuit ) ( Sul far della notte ) [ NON-USA FORMAT, PAL, Reg.0 Import - France ]
  • Just Before Nightfall (1971) ( Juste avante la nuit ) ( Sul far della notte )
  • Just Before Nightfall (1971)
  • Juste avante la nuit
  • Sul far della notte
  • Stphane Audran, Michel Bouquet, Franois Prier (Actors)

12. Dirty Hands (1975)

“Dirty Hands” (Les mains sales) is a 1975 French film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film is based on the play of the same name by Jean-Paul Sartre.

   

The story is set in an unnamed European country, where a political revolutionary named Hugo is tasked with assassinating a political leader who is seen as a threat to the cause.

Despite his reluctance, Hugo carries out the mission and becomes a hero to his comrades, but he struggles with guilt and the consequences of his actions.

The film is notable for its exploration of political ideology and the moral complexities of revolutionary action. The film’s cast, which includes Rod Steiger, Paolo Giusti, and André Falcon, delivers powerful and nuanced performances that capture the complexity of the characters and their beliefs.

“Dirty Hands” is a thought-provoking and emotionally resonant film that delves deep into the human condition and the ways in which ideology and morality can intersect and clash. The film is a must-see for fans of political dramas and philosophical narratives.

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13. À double tour (1959)

“À double tour” is a 1959 French crime film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film is based on the novel “The Key to Nicholas Street” by American crime writer Stanley Ellin.

The film tells the story of a wealthy family who live in a large estate in the French countryside. When the family’s patriarch is found murdered, the investigation begins to uncover a web of secrets and lies within the family.

As the investigation progresses, it becomes clear that anyone could be the killer, and the family’s darkest secrets are gradually revealed.

Chabrol’s direction is masterful, with a carefully constructed plot that keeps the viewer on the edge of their seat. The film is a classic example of the French “nouvelle vague” style of cinema, with a focus on complex characters and a deep exploration of psychological and social themes.

“À double tour” is a must-see for fans of the crime genre, and a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a filmmaker. The film is a classic example of French film noir, with a dark and brooding atmosphere and a gripping plot that will keep you guessing until the very end.

A Double Tour
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Madeleine Robinson, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Antonella Lualdi (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

14. Inspector Lavardin (1986)

“Inspector Lavardin” is a 1986 French crime film directed by Claude Chabrol, and starring Jean Poiret, Jean-Claude Brialy, and Bernadette Lafont.

The film follows Inspector Lavardin, a witty and intelligent police detective who is called to a small town in Brittany to investigate a murder case. As he delves deeper into the investigation, he uncovers a web of deceit and corruption that implicates many of the town’s most prominent citizens.

The film is known for its intelligent and well-crafted plot, as well as its exploration of themes such as power, corruption, and moral decay.

It features a strong performance from Jean Poiret in the lead role, as well as excellent supporting performances from the rest of the cast.

The film was praised for its sharp dialogue and its ability to create tension and suspense without relying on gratuitous violence.

“Inspector Lavardin” is considered one of Chabrol’s best crime films, and has been cited as an important work of French noir.

It is a well-crafted and engaging mystery that keeps viewers on the edge of their seats until the very end, and has been praised for its sophisticated and nuanced treatment of its characters and themes.

Inspector Lavardin Collection
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Jean Poiret, Michel Bouquet, Jean-Claude Brialy (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Dominique Roulet (Writer) - Marin Karmitz (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

15. Red Wedding (1973)

“Red Wedding” (original title: “Les Noces Rouges”) is a French film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1973.

The film tells the story of a wealthy family whose daughter marries into a lower-class family, and the tragic events that unfold during and after the wedding.

The film explores themes of class conflict, jealousy, and the corrupting influence of power. It features strong performances by actors Stéphane Audran and Michel Piccoli, who would go on to collaborate with Chabrol on several other films.

“Red Wedding” is known for its stylish direction and atmospheric cinematography, as well as its use of suspense and irony to build tension.

The film was controversial upon its release for its portrayal of violence and sexual content, but it was also well-received by critics and is now considered one of Chabrol’s most important works.

“Red Wedding” is notable for its influence on the genre of French psychological thrillers, and for its portrayal of the darker side of human relationships and social hierarchies. The film remains a powerful and haunting work of cinema, and a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a director.

Les Noces Rouges [1973] [DVD]
  • Wedding in Blood ( Les Noces rouges ) ( L' Amico di famiglia )
  • Wedding in Blood
  • Les Noces rouges
  • L' Amico di famiglia
  • Stéphane Audran, Michel Piccoli, Claude Piéplu (Actors)

16. Betty (1992)

“Betty” is a French drama film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1992.

The film tells the story of Betty (played by Marie Trintignant), a troubled young woman who arrives in Paris and begins working at a bar owned by a former model named Laure (played by Stéphane Audran).

As Betty becomes more involved in Laure’s life, she begins to unravel a web of secrets and lies surrounding Laure’s past and the people in her circle, including a wealthy businessman named Mario (played by Jean-François Garreaud) and a film director named Alex (played by Yves Lambrecht).

The film is notable for its complex and layered narrative, which slowly reveals the connections between the characters and the events of the past that have led to their present situations. It also features strong performances from the cast, particularly Trintignant in the lead role of Betty.

Chabrol’s direction is understated and nuanced, allowing the story and characters to develop in a natural and unforced way. The film also features beautiful cinematography that captures the gritty beauty of Paris, and a haunting score by Matthieu Chabrol.

Overall, “Betty” is a powerful and thought-provoking drama that explores complex themes of memory, identity, and the ways in which our past can shape our present. It is a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a director and his ability to create rich and nuanced characters and stories.

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17. Madame Bovary (1991)

“Madame Bovary” is a 1991 French film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film is based on the classic novel of the same name by Gustave Flaubert. The film tells the story of Emma Bovary, a beautiful and restless young woman who is trapped in a loveless marriage in rural France.

Dissatisfied with her life, Emma begins to seek out pleasure and excitement through affairs and material possessions, ultimately leading to her downfall.

The film is notable for its beautiful cinematography and its faithful adaptation of Flaubert’s novel. The film’s cast, which includes Isabelle Huppert, Jean-François Balmer, and Christophe Malavoy, delivers powerful and nuanced performances that capture the complex characters and their emotions.

“Madame Bovary” is a poignant and haunting film that explores the human desire for passion and the dangers of unchecked ambition.

The film is a powerful commentary on the social mores and gender roles of 19th-century France, and remains a timeless exploration of the human experience. The film is a must-see for fans of literary adaptations and character-driven dramas.

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Madame Bovary [DVD]
  • Isabelle Huppert, Jean-Franois Balmer, Christophe Malavoy (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Claude Chabrol (Writer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)

18. Nada (1974)

“Nada” is a 1974 French thriller film directed by Claude Chabrol, based on the novel of the same name by Jean-Patrick Manchette.

The film tells the story of a group of revolutionaries who kidnap the U.S. ambassador to France in an attempt to secure the release of a jailed comrade. However, the plan goes awry when the group begins to splinter and turn on each other.

The film is notable for its exploration of themes such as political activism, violence, and betrayal, as well as its examination of the tensions between different factions of the radical left.

Chabrol’s direction is understated and gritty, with a focus on character development and the nuances of political and social dynamics.

The film also features a standout performance by Michel Duchaussoy, who captures the idealism and disillusionment of the group’s leader, and a memorable turn by Stéphane Audran as a cynical journalist who becomes entangled in the group’s plans.

“Nada” is a powerful and thought-provoking film that offers a complex and nuanced exploration of politics, violence, and human behavior.

It stands as a testament to Chabrol’s skill as a director and his ability to craft compelling and emotionally resonant narratives. The film is an essential watch for fans of French cinema and those interested in exploring the complexities of political and social movements.

Nada
  • Maurice Garrel, Lou Castel, Mariangela Melato (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Antonietta Malzieri (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

19. Pleasure Party (1975)

“Pleasure Party” is a 1975 French comedy-drama film directed by Claude Chabrol. The film is set in a wealthy Parisian suburb and follows a group of friends who decide to experiment with partner-swapping at a weekend party.

The film explores themes of love, jealousy, and sexual freedom, as the characters’ relationships are put to the test. Chabrol’s direction is subtle and nuanced, with a focus on character development and interpersonal relationships.

The film’s tone is both playful and melancholic, with a mix of light-hearted humor and dark emotional undercurrents.

The performances by the ensemble cast, which includes actors such as Stéphane Audran, Michel Piccoli, and Jane Birkin, are excellent, adding depth and complexity to the characters.

Overall, “Pleasure Party” is a thought-provoking and engaging film that explores complex themes with a light touch. Chabrol’s direction is masterful, and the film’s combination of humor and pathos makes it a unique and unforgettable viewing experience.

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20. A Girl Cut in Two (2007)

“A Girl Cut in Two” is a 2007 French film directed by Claude Chabrol, and starring Ludivine Sagnier, François Berléand, and Benoît Magimel.

The film is a dark and twisted exploration of obsession and desire, centering on a love triangle between a beautiful television weathergirl, a wealthy older man, and a young and passionate writer.

The film is known for its sophisticated and stylish atmosphere, as well as its exploration of themes such as power, manipulation, and the destructive nature of desire.

It features strong performances from the lead actors, particularly Ludivine Sagnier in the role of the weathergirl, who delivers a nuanced and complex portrayal of a woman torn between two very different men.

“A Girl Cut in Two” is considered one of Chabrol’s most accomplished and mature films, and has been cited as an important work of modern French cinema.

It is a gripping and thought-provoking exploration of human psychology and relationships, and has been praised for its subtle and sophisticated treatment of its characters and themes.

The Girl Cut in Two [DVD]
  • The Girl Cut in Two ( La fille coupée en deux ) ( Die zweigeteilte Frau )
  • The Girl Cut in Two
  • La fille coupée en deux
  • Die zweigeteilte Frau
  • François Berléand, Mathilda May, Etienne Chicot (Actors)

21. Le Beau Serge (1958)

“Le Beau Serge” is a French film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1958. It is Chabrol’s debut feature and is widely regarded as one of the most important films of the French New Wave movement.

The film tells the story of François, a young man who returns to his hometown after many years to visit his childhood friend Serge. François discovers that Serge has become an alcoholic and is trapped in a loveless marriage, and tries to help him reclaim his former vitality and sense of purpose.

“Le Beau Serge” explores themes of identity, memory, and the complexities of human relationships. It is notable for its realistic and unflinching portrayal of rural life in post-war France, and for its use of naturalistic acting and location shooting.

The film was well-received by critics upon its release and is now considered a classic of French cinema. It launched Chabrol’s career as a director and established many of the themes and techniques that would come to define his work, such as his interest in psychological and social analysis, and his use of suspense and irony to build tension.

“Le Beau Serge” remains a powerful and poignant portrait of friendship, disillusionment, and the search for meaning in a changing world.

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Le Beau Serge (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Gerard Blain, Jean-Claude Brialy, Michele Meritz (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

22. Ten Days Wonder (1971)

“Ten Days Wonder” (French title: “La Décade prodigieuse”) is a French-Italian psychological thriller film directed by Claude Chabrol and released in 1971.

The film is based on a novel by Ellery Queen and tells the story of a wealthy and eccentric man named Charles Van Horn (played by Orson Welles) who is murdered in his mansion in the French countryside.

The investigation into Van Horn’s death is led by his nephew Paul Regis (played by Anthony Perkins), who must navigate a web of family secrets and hidden agendas in order to solve the crime.

As the investigation unfolds, Paul becomes increasingly obsessed with the case and begins to suspect that his own wife (played by Marlène Jobert) may be involved.

The film is notable for its complex and convoluted narrative, which weaves together multiple plot threads and flashbacks in a way that keeps the audience guessing until the final revelation.

It also features strong performances from the cast, particularly Perkins and Welles, who bring a sense of gravitas and intensity to their respective roles.

Chabrol’s direction is elegant and understated, allowing the story and characters to develop in a natural and unforced way. The film also features beautiful cinematography that captures the stunning natural beauty of the French countryside, and a memorable score by Pierre Jansen.

Overall, “Ten Days Wonder” is a gripping and suspenseful thriller that showcases Chabrol’s skill as a director and his ability to craft complex and nuanced narratives. It is a must-see for fans of classic mystery and suspense films.

Ten Days' Wonder
  • Anthony Perkins, Michel Piccoli, Marlne Jobert (Actors)
  • Claude Chabrol (Director) - Eugne Archer (Writer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

3 Characteristics of Claude Chabrol Films

Claude Chabrol was a prominent French film director known for his work in the New Wave movement of the 1960s. Here are three characteristics that can be found in many of his films:

Exploration of the darker side of human nature: Chabrol’s films often explore the darker aspects of human nature, including greed, jealousy, and obsession. His characters are often flawed and complex, and the films delve into their psychological motivations and emotional conflicts.

Focus on the bourgeoisie and social class: Chabrol’s films often center on the lives and experiences of the middle class and upper class, particularly in rural France. He often uses this setting to critique the values and social mores of the bourgeoisie and to explore the tensions and conflicts that arise from class differences.

Use of suspense and tension: Chabrol was known for his skill in building suspense and tension in his films. He often uses slow, deliberate pacing and subtle camera movements to create a sense of unease and anticipation in the viewer, building to a climactic moment of violence or revelation. His films often blend elements of thriller, mystery, and drama to create a unique and engrossing cinematic experience.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch Claude Chabrol Films

Here are three reasons why you should watch films by Claude Chabrol:

Mastery of Suspense: Chabrol is often considered to be one of the masters of the suspense genre, and his films are known for their slow build-up of tension, intricate plotting, and shocking twists. His films often explore the dark side of human behavior and the psychological motivations behind violence and betrayal.

Exploration of Social Issues: Chabrol’s films often explore the complexities of social issues and the tensions that exist between different classes, groups, and individuals. His films are known for their social commentary, as well as their exploration of human behavior and psychology.

Collaboration with Talented Actors: Chabrol had a long and successful collaboration with actress Stéphane Audran, who appeared in many of his films and was his wife for many years.

Chabrol also worked with a number of other talented actors, including Michel Piccoli, Isabelle Huppert, and Jean-Pierre Cassel, among others. Chabrol’s films are known for their strong performances and nuanced character development, which is a testament to his skill as a director.

Best Claude Chabrol Films – Wrapping Up

Claude Chabrol was a prolific French filmmaker with a career spanning over five decades. Known for his works in the thriller and crime genres, Chabrol’s films often explored complex psychological themes and societal issues. Here are some of his best films that are worth checking out:

“Le Boucher” (1970) – A psychological thriller about a butcher who may be responsible for a series of murders in a small French town.

“La Cérémonie” (1995) – A suspenseful drama about a young woman who becomes a live-in maid for an affluent family and develops a strange relationship with the family’s rebellious daughter.

“Les Biches” (1968) – A psychological drama about a wealthy lesbian who takes a young woman under her wing, only to become jealous when the woman falls in love with a man.

“Just Before Nightfall” (1971) – A psychological thriller about a man who confesses to his wife that he has murdered his mistress, only to discover that his wife may have known all along.

“This Man Must Die” (1969) – A psychological thriller about a man who seeks revenge on the hit-and-run driver responsible for his young son’s death.

These are just a few examples of Chabrol’s impressive body of work. Whether you are a fan of the thriller genre or simply appreciate masterful filmmaking, there is sure to be a Chabrol film that will appeal to you.