George Roy Hill was an American film director known for his contributions to the film industry during the 1960s and 1970s.

Hill was a master of various genres, including drama, comedy, and action, and was praised for his ability to bring depth and complexity to his characters.

One of Hill’s most notable films is “The Sting” (1973), which won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.

The film tells the story of two grifters played by Paul Newman and Robert Redford who team up to pull off an elaborate con in 1930s Chicago.

The film was praised for its witty screenplay, clever plot twists, and superb performances by its cast.

Another standout film in Hill’s career is “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” (1969), which starred Newman and Redford in the titular roles.

The film follows the exploits of two outlaws as they try to evade the law and make their way to Bolivia. The film was praised for its humor, action, and the chemistry between its two leads, and won four Academy Awards.

Other notable films directed by Hill include “The World According to Garp” (1982), which starred Robin Williams, “Slap Shot” (1977), a comedy about a minor league hockey team, and “Thoroughly Modern Millie” (1967), a musical comedy starring Julie Andrews.

Best George Roy Hill Movies

George Roy Hill was a versatile director whose films continue to be celebrated for their storytelling, humor, and memorable performances by their casts.

1. Period of Adjustment (1962)

“Period of Adjustment” is a romantic comedy film released in 1962, directed by George Roy Hill and starring Jane Fonda, Anthony Franciosa, Jim Hutton, and Lois Nettleton.

The movie is based on the play of the same name by Tennessee Williams and tells the story of two couples who spend Christmas Eve together in a small southern town.

The first couple, Isabel and George, are experiencing marital difficulties, while the second couple, Dorothea and Ralph, have just gotten married but are struggling to adjust to their new roles.

As the night progresses, secrets are revealed, and tensions rise, but ultimately, the couples learn to communicate and understand each other better.

“Period of Adjustment” is a lighthearted and charming film that explores themes such as marriage, communication, and the search for happiness.

   

The movie features strong performances from its ensemble cast, particularly Jane Fonda and Anthony Franciosa, who bring depth and nuance to their characters.

The film’s setting in a small southern town adds an extra layer of warmth and nostalgia to the proceedings, making it a perfect film to watch during the holiday season.

Overall, “Period of Adjustment” is a delightful romantic comedy that offers a witty and insightful look at the joys and challenges of relationships.

Period of Adjustment
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Anthony Franciosa, Jane Fonda, Jim Hutton (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Isobel Lennart (Writer) - Lawrence Weingarten (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

2. Toys in the Attic (1963)

“Toys in the Attic” is a play written by Lillian Hellman. It was first performed on Broadway in 1960 and later adapted into a film in 1963, directed by George Roy Hill.

The story is set in New Orleans and follows two sisters, Carrie and Anna Berniers, who live together in their family’s large, decaying mansion.

When their ne’er-do-well brother Julian returns home after a long absence, he brings with him his young bride, Lily.

As Julian’s true character and intentions are gradually revealed, tensions mount between the siblings and secrets from the past come to light.

The play explores themes of family dynamics, greed, jealousy, and betrayal. It received critical acclaim and was nominated for several Tony Awards, including Best Play.

The film adaptation starred Dean Martin, Geraldine Page, and Wendy Hiller, and received mixed reviews.

Toys in the Attic
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Dean Martin, Geraldine Page, Gene Tierney, Wendy Hiller (Actor)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Screenplay by JAMES POE (Writer) - Produced by WALTER MIRISCH...
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

3. The World of Henry Orient (1964)

“The World of Henry Orient” is a comedy-drama film released in 1964, directed by George Roy Hill and starring Peter Sellers and Tippy Walker.

The film follows two young girls, Val and Marian, who become infatuated with a pianist named Henry Orient (played by Sellers) and begin following him around New York City.

The film explores themes such as adolescence, friendship, and the desire for escape and adventure. It also touches on the theme of celebrity and the impact it can have on those who seek it out.

“The World of Henry Orient” is known for its strong performances, particularly by Peter Sellers, who delivers a charming and entertaining portrayal of Henry Orient.

Tippy Walker and Merrie Spaeth also shine in their roles as the two young girls.

Overall, “The World of Henry Orient” is a delightful and whimsical film that offers a nostalgic look at adolescence and the pursuit of adventure.

It is a must-watch for fans of classic cinema and those interested in exploring themes of friendship, celebrity, and the human condition.

The World of Henry Orient
  • Peter Sellers, Tippy Walker, Merrie Spaeth (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Nora Johnson (Writer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

4. Hawaii (1966)

“Hawaii” is a 1966 epic drama film directed by George Roy Hill and based on the novel of the same name by James A. Michener. The film stars Julie Andrews, Max von Sydow, Richard Harris, and Gene Hackman, among others.

The story follows a group of Christian missionaries who arrive in Hawaii in the early 19th century, hoping to convert the native population to Christianity.

The film depicts the clash of cultures between the missionaries and the Hawaiians, as well as the struggles of the native people to maintain their traditional way of life in the face of colonization and exploitation.

Hill’s direction of “Hawaii” is notable for its sweeping cinematography and attention to detail in recreating the period setting.

   

The film features stunning landscapes, colorful costumes, and a lush score by Elmer Bernstein.

The performances by the cast are also strong, particularly von Sydow as the stern but conflicted missionary Abner Hale and Andrews as the headstrong and independent missionary’s wife Jerusha Bromley.

While “Hawaii” received mixed critical reception upon its release, it was a commercial success and went on to become a classic of the historical epic genre.

The film’s exploration of themes such as colonialism, cultural identity, and religious conflict have ensured its enduring relevance and appeal.

Hill’s direction, along with the strong performances and stunning visuals, helped to make “Hawaii” a memorable and impactful film.

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5. Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967)

“Thoroughly Modern Millie” is a 1967 musical comedy film directed by George Roy Hill and starring Julie Andrews, Mary Tyler Moore, and Carol Channing.

The film is set in the 1920s and follows the adventures of a young woman named Millie (Andrews) as she moves from a small town to New York City to find a wealthy husband.

Along the way, she becomes involved in a white slavery ring and falls in love with a poor paperclip salesman named Jimmy (James Fox).

The film features colorful costumes, lively musical numbers, and memorable performances by its cast. Andrews shines as the plucky and determined Millie, while Tyler Moore and Channing bring humor and energy to their supporting roles.

The film’s score includes catchy tunes such as “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Jimmy,” which have become classics of the genre.

Despite its popularity and critical acclaim, the film has also been the subject of some controversy due to its portrayal of Asian characters. Some critics have argued that the film perpetuates racial stereotypes and cultural insensitivity.

Overall, “Thoroughly Modern Millie” is a charming and entertaining musical that showcases the talents of its director and cast. While it may be viewed through a modern lens that exposes some problematic aspects, it remains a beloved classic of the genre.

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Thoroughly Modern Millie (Special Roadshow Edition)
  • Julie Andrews, James Fox, Mary Tyler Moore (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: G (General Audience)

6. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)

“Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” is a western film released in 1969, directed by George Roy Hill and starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford.

The movie tells the story of the infamous outlaw duo, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, as they evade the law and attempt to rob a train carrying a large amount of cash.

As the two outlaws continue their life of crime, they must contend with the relentless pursuit of a determined lawman, played by Jeff Corey.

Along the way, they encounter various colorful characters, including a schoolteacher played by Katharine Ross, who becomes romantically involved with Sundance.

“Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” is a classic western that combines thrilling action sequences with a wry sense of humor and an infectious sense of camaraderie between its two leads.

The movie features memorable performances from Newman and Redford, who would go on to star in several other films together.

The film is also notable for its innovative cinematography, which features freeze-frame shots and montages set to popular songs of the time.

Overall, “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” is an entertaining and iconic film that has stood the test of time and continues to be beloved by audiences today.

7. Slaughterhouse-Five (1972)

“Slaughterhouse-Five” is a 1972 film directed by George Roy Hill, based on the novel of the same name by Kurt Vonnegut.

The film tells the story of Billy Pilgrim, a World War II veteran who becomes “unstuck in time” and experiences various moments of his life out of chronological order, including his time as a prisoner of war in Dresden, Germany during the bombing raids.

The film is a darkly humorous and satirical exploration of the trauma of war and its lasting effects on individuals and society.

It features a standout performance by Michael Sacks as Billy Pilgrim, as well as supporting performances by Ron Leibman and Valerie Perrine..

Hill’s direction brings a dreamlike quality to the film, with surreal imagery and non-linear storytelling that effectively capture the disorienting nature of Billy’s experiences.

The film also features a memorable score by composer Glenn Gould, which adds to the otherworldly atmosphere of the story.

While the film was not a commercial success upon its release, it has since become a cult classic and is regarded as a significant work of both Vonnegut’s and Hill’s careers.

It remains a powerful and thought-provoking exploration of the effects of war on the human psyche, and the ways in which trauma can shape our perceptions of reality.

8. The Sting (1973)

“The Sting” is a crime comedy film released in 1973, directed by George Roy Hill and starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford.

The movie tells the story of two con men, Henry Gondorff and Johnny Hooker, who team up to pull off a long con against a powerful and dangerous gangster named Doyle Lonnegan, played by Robert Shaw.

As Gondorff and Hooker plan and execute their elaborate con, they encounter a colorful cast of characters, including a corrupt police officer played by Charles Durning and a sultry lounge singer played by Roberta Flack.

The film is set in the 1930s and features a rich period atmosphere, complete with vintage cars, fedoras, and jazz music.

“The Sting” is a clever and entertaining film that is known for its intricate plot, snappy dialogue, and memorable performances.

Newman and Redford have fantastic chemistry as the two lead characters, and the film features strong supporting performances from the rest of the cast.

The movie won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay, and it remains one of the most beloved and iconic films of the 1970s.

Overall, “The Sting” is a classic movie that is sure to delight fans of crime films, comedies, and vintage Hollywood glamour.

The Sting
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - David S. Ward (Writer) - Tony Bill (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

9. The Great Waldo Pepper (1975)

The Great Waldo Pepper is an adventure drama film released in 1975. It was directed by George Roy Hill and written by William Goldman.

The movie stars Robert Redford in the lead role, alongside Susan Sarandon, Bo Svenson, and Geoffrey Lewis.

The film follows the story of Waldo Pepper, a former World War I pilot who now works as a stunt pilot in air shows across the United States.

Pepper dreams of becoming a movie star, but finds himself constantly upstaged by other pilots who perform increasingly dangerous stunts.

He also struggles with guilt over his wartime experiences and the death of his former colleague.

The Great Waldo Pepper is known for its breathtaking aerial sequences, which were filmed with real vintage planes and without the use of special effects.

The movie also explores themes of fame, ambition, and the changing landscape of aviation in the early 20th century.

Upon its release, The Great Waldo Pepper received mixed reviews from critics, with some praising its thrilling action sequences and others criticizing its lack of narrative depth.

However, the film has since become a cult classic, with many aviation enthusiasts and fans of adventure films appreciating its unique blend of historical accuracy and high-flying action.

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The Great Waldo Pepper
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Robert Redford, Bo Svenson, Bo Brundin (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - William Goldman (Writer) - George Roy Hill (Producer)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

10. Slap Shot (1977)

“Slap Shot” is a sports comedy film released in 1977, directed by George Roy Hill and written by Nancy Dowd.

The movie is set in a declining minor-league hockey team called the Charlestown Chiefs, located in a fictional town in New England.

The plot follows the team’s struggles both on and off the ice, as they try to attract larger crowds to their games and keep the team from being disbanded by the owner.

The team’s coach, Reggie Dunlop, played by Paul Newman, comes up with a unique strategy to turn the team’s fortunes around: encouraging them to play dirty and violent, in hopes of drawing more attention to the team.

The film features a cast of colorful characters, including the Hanson brothers, three bespectacled, violent players who become fan favorites.

The film also explores themes of loyalty, perseverance, and the struggle to hold onto what you love.

“Slap Shot” was a box office success and has since become a cult classic among hockey fans and sports movie enthusiasts.

It has been praised for its humor, performances, and realistic portrayal of minor-league hockey culture. The film has also been noted for its use of profanity and raunchy humor.

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Slap Shot
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Paul Newman, Michael Ontkean, Martin Strother (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Nancy Dowd (Writer) - Stephen J. Friedman (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

11. A Little Romance (1979)

“A Little Romance” is a romantic comedy-drama film released in 1979, directed by George Roy Hill and starring Laurence Olivier, Diane Lane, and Thelonious Bernard.

The film follows two young teenagers, Lauren and Daniel, who fall in love in Paris and embark on a romantic adventure to Venice.

The film explores themes such as love, friendship, and the magic of youth. It also touches on the theme of cultural differences and the challenges that come with navigating a foreign country.

“A Little Romance” is known for its charming performances, particularly by Diane Lane, who delivers a captivating portrayal of Lauren. Laurence Olivier also shines in his role as the eccentric and mischievous character, Julius.

Overall, “A Little Romance” is a heartwarming and whimsical film that offers a nostalgic look at young love and the thrill of adventure.

It is a must-watch for fans of romantic comedies and those interested in exploring themes of friendship, cultural differences, and the human experience.

A Little Romance [DVD]
  • Laurence Olivier, Diane Lane, Thelonious Bernard (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Allan Burns (Writer)
  • English, Spanish, French (Subtitles)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

12. The World According to Garp (1982)

“The World According to Garp” is a 1982 comedy-drama film directed by George Roy Hill, based on the novel of the same name by John Irving.

The film stars Robin Williams in the title role, alongside Glenn Close, Mary Beth Hurt, and John Lithgow.

The story follows the life of T.S. Garp (Williams), a struggling writer and son of a feminist icon, who navigates the complexities of love, family, and gender identity in the tumultuous social climate of the 1960s and 70s.

The film explores themes such as sexuality, gender roles, feminism, and violence, and presents a nuanced and complex portrait of its central character.

Hill’s direction of “The World According to Garp” is notable for its deft balance of humor and pathos, and its sensitive treatment of the film’s complex themes.

The film features strong performances from its cast, particularly Williams in a role that allowed him to showcase both his comedic and dramatic talents.

Close, Hurt, and Lithgow also deliver memorable performances in supporting roles.

While the film received mixed critical reception upon its release, it has since become a cult classic and a beloved entry in the genre of literary adaptations.

Hill’s direction, along with the strong performances and thought-provoking themes, helped to make “The World According to Garp” a memorable and impactful film.

The World According To Garp
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Robin Williams, Mary Beth Hurt, Glenn Close (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Steve Tesich (Writer) - George Roy Hill (Producer)
  • English (Playback Language)
  • English (Subtitle)

13. The Little Drummer Girl (1984)

“The Little Drummer Girl” is a 1984 spy thriller film directed by George Roy Hill, based on the novel of the same name by John le Carré.

The film stars Diane Keaton as Charlie, a struggling actress who becomes embroiled in a complex plot involving Israeli intelligence, Palestinian terrorists, and a British spy named Becker (played by Klaus Kinski).

The film is a tense and intricately plotted thriller, with Hill’s direction effectively building suspense and tension throughout.

Keaton delivers a strong performance as Charlie, a character who undergoes a transformation as she becomes more deeply involved in the dangerous world of espionage. Kinski is also memorable as the enigmatic and manipulative Becker.

The film’s themes of political conflict and moral ambiguity are explored through the complex relationships between its characters, and the ways in which their loyalties and allegiances shift over the course of the story.

The film’s climactic scenes are particularly intense, as Charlie finds herself caught between the conflicting interests of various factions and must make a difficult choice that will have far-reaching consequences.

While the film was not a commercial success upon its release, it has since become a cult classic and is regarded as one of Hill’s most underrated works.

It remains a gripping and thought-provoking exploration of the murky world of espionage, and the toll that it can take on those who become caught up in its machinations.

The Little Drummer Girl Season 1
  • Amazon Prime Video (Video on Demand)
  • Michael Shannon, Alexander Skarsgård, Florence Pugh (Actors)
  • Park Chan-wook (Director) - Michael Lesslie (Writer) - Park Chan-wook (Producer)

14. Funny Farm (1988)

“Funny Farm” is a comedy film released in 1988, directed by George Roy Hill and starring Chevy Chase and Madolyn Smith.

The movie tells the story of a married couple, Andy and Elizabeth Farmer, who decide to leave their hectic New York City life behind and move to a small town in Vermont to pursue a more peaceful and idyllic existence.

As the Farmers settle into their new home, they quickly realize that small-town life is not quite what they expected, and they find themselves in a series of comical and often absurd situations.

Along the way, they encounter a colorful cast of characters, including a gruff postman, a nosy neighbor, and a local real estate agent.

“Funny Farm” is a lighthearted and charming film that offers a humorous and affectionate look at small-town life.

Chevy Chase gives a strong performance as the bumbling and hapless Andy Farmer, and the movie features several laugh-out-loud moments, as well as a heartwarming message about the importance of family and community.

The film’s picturesque Vermont setting and quirky characters add an extra layer of charm to the proceedings, making it a perfect movie to watch on a lazy afternoon or as a feel-good family film. Overall, “Funny Farm” is an entertaining and enjoyable comedy that is sure to put a smile on your face.

Funny Farm (1988)
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Chevy Chase, Madolyn Smith, Joseph Maher (Actors)
  • George Roy Hill (Director) - Jeffrey Boam (Writer) - Robert L. Crawford (Producer) - Jay Cronley...
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)

3 Characteristics of George Roy Hill Films

George Roy Hill was a versatile filmmaker who directed films across a variety of genres. Here are three characteristics that are commonly found in his films:

Attention to detail: Hill was known for his meticulous approach to filmmaking, paying close attention to every aspect of his films, including the costumes, set design, and cinematography.

He was particularly skilled at creating immersive and believable worlds on screen, whether it was the Wild West of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid or the 1930s Chicago of The Sting.

Strong ensemble casts: Hill’s films often featured large ensemble casts, with each character having their own distinct personality and motivations.

He was known for his ability to direct actors and bring out their best performances, resulting in memorable and well-rounded characters.

A blend of humor and drama: Hill’s films often combined humor and drama, creating a unique tone that balanced light-hearted moments with more serious themes.

He was particularly adept at crafting witty and clever dialogue, as seen in The Sting and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which have become classics of the comedy-drama genre.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch George Roy Hill Films

George Roy Hill was a talented and influential filmmaker who directed some of the most acclaimed movies of the 20th century. Here are three reasons why you should watch his films:

Creative storytelling: Hill was known for his unique and creative approach to storytelling, often using flashbacks, nonlinear narratives, and other unconventional techniques to tell his stories in a fresh and engaging way.

His films are not only visually stunning but also emotionally resonant, with richly developed characters and complex themes.

Stellar performances: Hill had a talent for getting the best performances out of his actors, and many of his films feature some of the most iconic performances in cinema history.

Actors such as Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and Henry Fonda all gave some of their best performances under Hill’s direction, and his films are full of memorable characters and powerful performances.

Timeless classics: Many of Hill’s films have stood the test of time and continue to be beloved by audiences and critics alike.

From the western epic “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to the romantic drama “The World According to Garp,” Hill’s films are timeless classics that still resonate with audiences today.

Watching his films is not only an opportunity to appreciate the work of a master filmmaker, but also to experience some of the most memorable and impactful movies of the 20th century.

Best George Roy Hill Films – Wrapping Up

George Roy Hill was a highly acclaimed director who made a significant impact on Hollywood. He directed several critically acclaimed films, and here are some of his best films:

“Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” (1969): This classic Western film starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford tells the story of two outlaws on the run from the law. The film is known for its iconic performances, memorable soundtrack, and stunning cinematography.

“The Sting” (1973): This crime comedy-drama starring Paul Newman and Robert Redford won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The film follows two con artists who seek revenge on a dangerous gangster.

“A Little Romance” (1979): This romantic comedy-drama follows two young teenagers who fall in love in Paris and embark on a romantic adventure to Venice. The film is known for its charming performances and whimsical storyline.

“The World According to Garp” (1982): This drama starring Robin Williams tells the story of a struggling writer and his life journey, exploring themes such as family, love, and loss. The film is known for its strong performances and powerful storyline.

George Roy Hill’s films often explored themes such as friendship, adventure, and the human condition, and he had a talent for bringing out memorable performances from his actors.

His films have left a lasting impact on Hollywood and continue to be celebrated by audiences and critics alike.