Krzysztof Kieslowski was a Polish filmmaker who is widely regarded as one of the greatest directors of all time.

His films are known for their philosophical depth, emotional resonance, and visual poetry. Here are some of Kieslowski’s best films and a brief introduction to each one:

“The Decalogue” (1989): This ten-part television series explores the moral and ethical dilemmas faced by ordinary people in modern Poland.

Each episode is based on one of the Ten Commandments, and the series as a whole offers a complex and nuanced portrait of contemporary society.

“Three Colors” trilogy (1993-1994): This trilogy of films – “Blue,” “White,” and “Red” – is named after the colors of the French flag and explores the themes of liberty, equality, and fraternity.

Each film stands alone, but together they form a cohesive and deeply moving meditation on the human condition.

“The Double Life of Veronique” (1991): This film follows two women, one in Poland and one in France, who are identical in appearance but live very different lives.

The film is a poetic exploration of the themes of identity, destiny, and the interconnectedness of all things.

Best Krzysztof Kieslowski Films

Kieslowski’s films are marked by their emotional intensity, philosophical depth, and visual poetry, and his work continues to influence filmmakers around the world.

1. Dekalog (1989–1990)

“Dekalog” is a ten-part television series created by the Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Kieślowski. Each episode of the series explores a different one of the Ten Commandments, with the themes of each episode ranging from love and betrayal to faith and morality.

Here are three reasons why you should watch “Dekalog”:

Depth of Character: Kieślowski is known for his ability to create complex, multifaceted characters, and “Dekalog” is no exception.

Each episode of the series tells a self-contained story, but the characters are so well-drawn that they feel like real people.

The audience is able to empathize with their struggles and dilemmas, and the emotional impact of the series is all the more powerful for it.

Mastery of Craft: “Dekalog” is a masterclass in filmmaking, showcasing Kieślowski’s incredible skill as a director.

The cinematography is gorgeous, with each frame carefully composed and full of meaning. The use of music is also exceptional, with a haunting score that enhances the emotional impact of the series.

Overall, “Dekalog” is a thought-provoking and emotionally powerful series that explores deep philosophical and ethical questions through its exploration of the Ten Commandments.

It is a masterpiece of filmmaking and is highly recommended for anyone interested in complex, character-driven storytelling and the exploration of deep philosophical and ethical questions.

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Dekalog (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
  • Aleksander Bardini, Janusz Gajos, Krystyna Janda (Actors)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

2. Blind Chance (1987)

“Blind Chance” is a 1987 Polish drama film directed by Krzysztof Kieślowski. The film tells the story of a man named Witek, who experiences three different versions of his life depending on whether he catches or misses a train.

In each version of his life, Witek encounters different people and experiences different outcomes, highlighting the role that chance plays in shaping our lives.

“Blind Chance” is notable for its innovative narrative structure, which explores the idea of the “what-if” scenario and the ways in which small decisions can have a profound impact on our lives.

The film also touches on themes of political oppression and individual freedom, as Witek’s life is shaped in part by the political climate of communist Poland.

“Blind Chance” is regarded as one of Kieślowski’s most important and influential films, and is notable for its innovative narrative structure, nuanced character development, and thought-provoking exploration of the role of chance in human life.

The film has had a lasting impact on the world of cinema, and is widely regarded as a classic of Polish and European cinema.

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Blind Chance
  • Boguslaw Linda (Actor)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • Audience Rating: NR (Not Rated)

3. The Double Life of Véronique (1991)

“The Double Life of Veronique” is a 1991 drama film directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski. The film follows the lives of two young women, Veronika and Weronika, who are both played by French actress Irene Jacob.

The two women live in different cities, but are connected by a strange and unexplainable bond.

The film is notable for its haunting and dreamlike visuals, which use light, color, and music to create a sense of mystery and enchantment.

The film’s score, composed by Zbigniew Preisner, is a standout element, with its haunting choral arrangements and ethereal melodies.

At its core, “The Double Life of Veronique” is a meditation on identity, destiny, and the interconnectedness of all things.

The film explores themes of duality, spirituality, and the power of intuition.

It is a deeply poetic and metaphysical work that is not afraid to challenge the viewer’s perceptions and push the boundaries of what is possible in cinema.

Overall, “The Double Life of Veronique” is a masterful work of art that showcases Kieslowski’s unique talent for creating films that are both intellectually stimulating and emotionally resonant.

It is a must-see for anyone interested in European art cinema and for those who are looking for a cinematic experience that is both thought-provoking and aesthetically beautiful.

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The Double Life of Veronique (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
  • Factory sealed DVD
  • Irene Jacob, Philippe Volter, Sandrine Dumas (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • English (Publication Language)

4. A Short Film About Love (1988)

A Short Film About Love” is a 1988 drama film directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski. The film is a feature-length expansion of Kieslowski’s episode “Decalogue VI” from the television series “Decalogue.”

The film follows the story of a 19-year-old postal worker named Tomek (Olaf Lubaszenko), who becomes obsessed with a beautiful older woman named Magda (Grazyna Szapolowska) who lives in an apartment across the courtyard.

“A Short Film About Love” is a powerful exploration of love, desire, and human connection.

The film is shot with a poetic and intimate style that draws the viewer into the lives of the characters, and explores their emotions and motivations in a nuanced and complex way.

The performances by Lubaszenko and Szapolowska are both outstanding, and help to bring the characters to life in a way that is both realistic and emotionally affecting.

Overall, “A Short Film About Love” is a deeply moving and thought-provoking film that is a testament to Kieslowski’s unique talent as a filmmaker.

It is a must-see for anyone who is interested in European cinema or in exploring the complexities of human relationships.

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A Short Film About Love [DVD]
  • SHORT FILM ABOUT LOVE, A (DVD MOVIE)
  • Grazyna Szapolowska, Olaf Lubaszenko, Stefania Iwinska (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Krzysztof Kieslowski (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

5. Three Colors: Blue (1993)

“Three Colors: Blue” is the first film in Krzysztof Kieslowski’s acclaimed “Three Colors” trilogy, which explores the themes of liberty, equality, and fraternity. Here are some key characteristics of the film:

Emotional intensity: “Blue” is a deeply emotional film that explores the themes of grief, loss, and personal liberation.

The film follows Julie, a woman who loses her husband and daughter in a car accident and attempts to start a new life while dealing with her grief and guilt.

Symbolism and visual storytelling: Kieslowski uses symbolism and visual storytelling to explore Julie’s emotional journey.

The color blue is a recurring motif throughout the film, representing both the pain and the possibility of liberation that Julie experiences.

Kieslowski also uses visual metaphors, such as a recurring shot of a swimming pool, to explore the film’s themes.

Music: The film’s score, composed by Zbigniew Preisner, is a key element of its emotional impact.

The music is haunting and evocative, and it contributes to the film’s melancholy and reflective tone.

Overall, “Three Colors: Blue” is a beautiful and deeply moving film that explores complex themes in a nuanced and poetic way.

It is a testament to Kieslowski’s talent as a filmmaker and his ability to create work that resonates with audiences on a deep and emotional level.

Three Colors: Blue
  • Juliette Binoche, Zbigniew Zamachowski, Julie Delpy (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Agnieszka Holland (Writer) - Marin Karmitz (Producer)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

6. A Short Film About Killing (1988)

“A Short Film About Killing” is a feature-length film directed by the Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Kieślowski, and it is one of the five episodes of his “Dekalog” television series.

The film tells the story of a brutal murder and the subsequent trial and execution of the killer. Here are three reasons why you should watch “A Short Film About Killing”:

Exploration of the Death Penalty: The film explores the issue of the death penalty and asks us to consider the morality of capital punishment.

The execution scene is particularly powerful, and the film does not shy away from showing the full horror of the act. It raises important questions about the use of the death penalty as a means of punishment and justice.

Masterful Filmmaking: As with all of Kieślowski’s films, “A Short Film About Killing” is a masterclass in filmmaking.

The cinematography is beautiful, with stunning shots of the city of Warsaw, and the use of color is particularly striking.

The film also features exceptional performances from the cast, particularly from Miroslaw Baka as the killer.

Overall, “A Short Film About Killing” is a powerful and thought-provoking film that explores the morality of the death penalty and raises important questions about justice and punishment.

It is emotionally intense and difficult to watch at times, but it is also a masterful work of filmmaking that showcases Kieślowski’s incredible skill as a director.

A Short Film About Killing [DVD]
  • SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING, A (DVD MOVIE)
  • Miroslaw Baka, Krzysztof Globisz, Jan Tesarz (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Krzysztof Kieslowski (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

7. Three Colors: Red (1994)

“Three Colors: Red” is a 1994 French drama film directed by Krzysztof Kieślowski, and is the final installment in his acclaimed “Three Colors” trilogy.

The film tells the story of a young model named Valentine, who becomes increasingly entangled in the lives of her elderly neighbor, a retired judge who eavesdrops on his neighbors’ phone conversations.

As their relationship deepens, Valentine begins to uncover secrets from the judge’s past, leading to a powerful and emotional climax.

“Three Colors: Red” is notable for its complex and interwoven plotlines, as well as its exploration of themes such as love, fate, and interconnectedness.

The film also features stunning visuals, with Kieślowski’s signature use of color and visual motifs to create a rich and immersive cinematic experience.

“Three Colors: Red” received critical acclaim upon its release, and has since been hailed as a classic of European cinema.

It won numerous awards, including the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and the Best Director prize from the National Society of Film Critics, and has been widely praised for its profound exploration of human relationships and its masterful storytelling.

Three Colors: Red
  • PAL
  • Irène Jacob, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Frédérique Feder (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Krzysztof Kieslowski (Writer) - Marin Karmitz (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

8. No End (1985)

“No End” is a 1985 drama film directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski. The film tells the story of a young lawyer named Jerzy (Jerzy Radziwilowicz), who is haunted by the ghost of a recently deceased labor activist named Marta (Grazyna Szapolowska).

The film also explores the lives of several other characters who are connected to Jerzy in various ways.

Through these characters, “No End” explores the themes of death, loss, and memory, and the ways in which individuals struggle to come to terms with their own mortality.

The film is notable for its visual style, which combines dreamlike sequences with gritty realism, and for its complex and multi-layered narrative structure.

Overall, “No End” is a deeply philosophical and emotionally resonant film that is a testament to Kieslowski’s unique vision and talent as a filmmaker.

It is a must-see for anyone who is interested in European art cinema, and for those who are looking for a cinematic experience that is both thought-provoking and aesthetically beautiful.

No End [DVD]
  • NO END BEZ KONCA (DVD MOVIE)
  • Grazyna Szapolowska, Maria Pakulnis, Aleksander Bardini (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Krzysztof Kieslowski (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

9. Three Colors: White (1994)

“Three Colors: White” is the second film in Krzysztof Kieslowski’s “Three Colors” trilogy, which explores the themes of liberty, equality, and fraternity. Here are some key characteristics of the film:

Satirical and comedic elements: Unlike the somber tone of “Three Colors: Blue,” “Three Colors: White” incorporates more comedic and satirical elements.

The film follows Karol, a Polish man who is abandoned by his French wife and decides to get revenge by tricking her into a fake marriage and then stealing her money.

Exploration of the nature of equality: The film explores the theme of equality in both personal and political contexts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fX7tyxBNsM

Karol begins the film as a powerless figure, but through his plot for revenge, he achieves a sense of power and control.

The film ultimately suggests that true equality can only exist in a world where power and control are balanced and shared.

Overall, “Three Colors: White” is a complex and nuanced film that explores important themes in a thoughtful and poetic way.

It is a testament to Kieslowski’s talent as a filmmaker and his ability to create work that is both emotionally resonant and intellectually engaging.

Three Colors: White
  • Polish Release, cover may contain Polish text/markings. The disk has English subtitles.
  • Zbigniew Zamachowski, Julie Delpy, Janusz Gajos (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Agnieszka Holland (Writer) - Marin Karmitz (Producer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: R (Restricted)

10. Camera Buff (1979)

“Camera Buff” is a film directed by the acclaimed Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Kieślowski.

The film tells the story of a factory worker named Filip Mosz, who becomes fascinated with the art of filmmaking after receiving a 16mm camera as a gift.

Here are three reasons why you should watch “Camera Buff”:

Exploration of the Power of Film: “Camera Buff” explores the transformative power of film and the effect it can have on people’s lives.

Filip’s newfound passion for filmmaking leads him to question his life choices and take risks he would never have considered before.

The film asks us to consider the role of art and creativity in our lives and the impact it can have on our personal growth.

Satirical Take on Communism: The film takes a satirical look at the workings of the Communist system in Poland at the time.

Through Filip’s growing interest in filmmaking, Kieślowski highlights the restrictions and limitations placed on creative expression under communism, and the ways in which state control can stifle personal freedom.

Overall, “Camera Buff” is a thought-provoking and satirical film that explores the transformative power of art and creativity, while also taking a critical look at the workings of the Communist system in Poland at the time.

It features excellent performances and is a testament to Kieślowski’s skill as a director.

Camera Buff [DVD]
  • CAMERA BUFF AMATOR (DVD MOVIE)
  • Jerzy Stuhr, Malgorzata Zabkowska, Ewa Pokas (Actors)
  • Krzysztof Kieslowski (Director) - Jerzy Stuhr (Writer)
  • English (Subtitle)
  • Audience Rating: Unrated (Not Rated)

11. Talking Heads (1980)

“Talking Heads” is a British television series created by playwright and filmmaker Alan Bennett. The series consists of a collection of monologues, with each episode featuring a different character addressing the camera and sharing their thoughts and experiences with the audience.

The series is notable for its intimate and insightful exploration of human nature, as well as its witty and incisive writing.

The monologues in “Talking Heads” cover a wide range of subjects, from love and loneliness to aging and death.

The characters are all portrayed with sensitivity and nuance, with each monologue offering a unique and thought-provoking perspective on the human experience.

The series also features a strong cast of actors, with performances by the likes of Maggie Smith, Patricia Routledge, and Thora Hird.

“Talking Heads” has been widely praised for its innovative format and insightful storytelling, and is considered a classic of British television.

The series has been adapted for the stage and has also been the subject of several revivals and adaptations, including a 2020 revival featuring performances by Martin Freeman, Tamsin Greig, and Kristin Scott Thomas.

3 Characteristics of Krzysztof Kieslowski Films

Krzysztof Kieslowski was a renowned Polish filmmaker known for his distinctive style and thematic concerns. Here are three key characteristics of his films:

Philosophical explorations: Kieslowski’s films often grapple with complex philosophical questions and moral dilemmas.

He was interested in exploring the human condition and the ways in which individuals navigate the challenges of life.

Some of his most famous films, such as the “Three Colors” trilogy, are structured around philosophical concepts like liberty, equality, and fraternity.

Symbolism and metaphor: Kieslowski was a master of using symbolism and metaphor to convey deeper meanings and emotions.

He often used recurring motifs and visual cues to create a sense of unity and coherence across his films.

For example, the color red is a powerful symbol in his “Three Colors: Red” film, representing everything from passion to danger to connection.

Humanistic approach: Despite the philosophical and metaphorical elements of his films, Kieslowski was always deeply committed to portraying his characters with empathy and humanity.

He had a keen eye for observing the small details of everyday life and was able to capture the complexity and nuance of human relationships.

His films are known for their richly drawn characters and emotionally resonant stories.

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch Krzysztof Kieslowski Films

Here are three reasons why you should watch Krzysztof Kieslowski films:

Deep exploration of complex themes: Kieslowski’s films are known for their deep exploration of complex themes, such as love, loss, morality, and spirituality.

His films often present a multi-layered narrative structure that allows the viewer to reflect on the many different aspects of these themes.

Unique visual style: Kieslowski’s films are also known for their unique visual style.

He often employs a poetic and symbolic visual language that draws the viewer into the story and helps to convey the emotions and themes of the film.

Influence on contemporary cinema: Kieslowski’s films have had a significant influence on contemporary cinema, particularly in Europe.

His work has inspired a new generation of filmmakers, and his films continue to be studied and analyzed by film scholars around the world.

Watching Kieslowski’s films can provide a deeper understanding and appreciation of the art of cinema and its evolution over time.

Best Krzysztof Kieslowski Films – Wrapping Up

Krzysztof Kieslowski was a masterful filmmaker whose work continues to resonate with audiences today.

He was known for his poetic storytelling style, his exploration of complex themes, and his ability to convey deep emotion through his films. Here are some of his other notable films that are worth checking out:

“The Decalogue” (1989): This ten-part series explores the Ten Commandments through ten interconnected stories set in modern-day Poland.

“The Double Life of Veronique” (1991): This film explores the story of two women, one French and one Polish, who are identical in appearance and who experience parallel lives.

“Three Colors: Red” (1994): The final film in Kieslowski’s “Three Colors” trilogy, “Red” explores the theme of fraternity and features a strong lead performance by Irene Jacob.

Kieslowski’s work has had a profound impact on the film industry, inspiring many filmmakers and artists. His films continue to be studied and celebrated for their profound insight into the human condition and their poetic and nuanced storytelling style.

If you’re interested in exploring the work of Krzysztof Kieslowski, any of these films are a great place to start.